Monday, December 11, 2017
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Corrected

Mark Landler

Error (New York Times, Mark Landler and Maggie Haberman, 3/22/16): In March 2010, while serving as secretary of state, [Hillary Clinton] sharply criticized the Israeli authorities for approving new Jewish housing in an Arab neighborhood of Eastern Jerusalem when the United States was trying to get the Israelis and Palestinians back to the negotiating table.

Correction (3/22/16): An earlier version of this article misstated the type of neighborhood where Hillary Clinton sharply criticized the Israeli authorities for approving new Jewish housing when the United States was trying to get the Israelis and Palestinians back to the negotiating table. It was a Jewish neighborhood, not an Arab neighborhood.



Error (International New York Times, Mark Landler and Jodi Rudoren, 11/6/13): An absence of progress on the core issues, an ill-timed Israeli plan to build 3,500 more settlements on the West Bank and East Jerusalem. . .

Correction (11/7/13): An article on Wednesday about American efforts to reinvigorate the Middle East peace negotiations stated incorrectly that Israel plans to build 3,500 additional settlements on the West Bank and in East Jerusalem. Israel does not plan more settlements, but it has recently advanced projects for that number of new housing units within existing settlements.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Ruderon and Mark Landler, 12/1/12): Construction in E1, in West Bank territory that Israel captured in the 1967 war, would connect the large Jewish settlement of Maale Adumim to Jerusalem, dividing the West Bank in two. The Palestinian cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem would be cut off from the capital, making the contiguous Palestinian state endorsed by the United Nations last week virtually impossible.

Correction (12/8/12): Because of an editing error, an article last Saturday about Israel’s decision to move forward with planning and zoning for settlements in an area east of Jerusalem known as E1 described imprecisely the effect of such development on access to the cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem from Jerusalem. While development of E1 would limit access to Ramallah and Bethlehem to narrow corridors far from the Old City and downtown Jerusalem, it would not completely separate those cities from Jerusalem.