Thursday, December 14, 2017
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Corrected

Jodi Rudoren

Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 10/27/15): "He was not carrying a knife, I saw everything," a [Palestinian] witness insisted. "If they show a knife, they planted it."

The Israeli police soon published a photo of a pocketknife, the kind Boy Scouts use, next to the slain teenager."



Correction (11/10/15): The Israeli police soon published a photo of a pocketknife next to the slain young man.
 
An earlier version of this article referred imprecisely to the knife in the Israeli police photo. It is a butterfly knife, which is traditionally used as a weapon. The Boy Scouts of America does not explicitly ban such knives; it endorses pocketknives for general use, and does not sell butterfly knives in its official Scout shop. Butterfly knives are legal in some states, and knife policies are set by individual troops, so it is possible, though unlikely, that some troops approve them. But the knife pictured is not typically “the kind Boy Scouts use."



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 10/3/15): The United Nations Security Council condemned Israel's annexation of Golan, and most of the world officially considers the territory illegally occupied, just like the West Bank.

Correction (10/14/15): The United Nations Security Council condemned Israel's annexation of Golan, and most of the world officially considers the territory occupied and the settlements there illegal, just like the West Bank …

 
An earlier version of this article referred incorrectly to the Golan Heights. While most of the world officially considers it to be occupied, and the settlements there illegal, there is no consensus that the occupation itself is illegal. The same error appeared in an earlier version of a caption with the accompanying slide show.



Error (New York Times, David E. Sanger, Michael D. Shear and Jodi Rudoren, 1/23/15): Mr. Netanyahu was accused of lecturing Mr. Obama in front of the cameras in the Oval Office during an angry conversation in May 2011, after Mr. Obama suggested that the 1967 borders with Palestine should be the starting point for peace negotiations. 

Correction (1/27/15): An article on Friday about a planned visit to the United States by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel referred incorrectly to President Obama’s suggestion, in a 2011 conversation with Mr. Netanyahu, for a baseline for negotiating the borders between Israel and a future Palestinian state. He suggested using the pre-1967 lines that separated Israel from the Jordanian-controlled West Bank, not Israel’s “1967 borders with Palestine.” (There was no state called Palestine in 1967.)



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 12/9/14): Professor Jamal said the Arab city of Nazareth has twice the population but 5 percent of the land of its neighbor, predominantly Jewish Upper Nazareth. . .

Correction (12/18/14): An earlier version of this article misstated the size of the Arab city of Nazareth relative to a neighboring town, predominantly Jewish Upper Nazareth, using information from a Tel Aviv University political science professor. Nazareth has nearly twice the population but less than half the land of Upper Nazareth, not twice the population and 5 percent of the land.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 11/19/14): [Mahmoud Abbas] also mentioned a recent arson at a West Bank mosque (a firebomb was thrown at an old synagogue in an Arab-Israeli town on the same day.)

Correction (12/19/14): A news analysis article on Nov. 19 about tensions between Israelis and Palestinians centered on a holy site in Jerusalem known to Muslims as Al Aqsa, or the Noble Sanctuary, and to Jews as the Temple Mount referred incorrectly to a fire at a West Bank mosque that the Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, mentioned in his demand that Jews “stop incitement against Aqsa.” The cause had yet to be determined; it was not a “recent arson.” (The Israeli police have since determined that the fire was most likely caused by an electrical fault, not arson.)



Error (International New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 9/15/14): The United Nations Relief and Works Agency runs schools through the ninth grade for the children of Palestinians who were expelled from or fled homes in Israel and the West Bank, about 70 percent of Gaza's 1.8 million residents.

Correction (9/19/14): Because of an editing error, an article on Monday in the Education section misstated the family history of the students through the ninth grade who attend schools run by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency in Gaza. They are the descendants of Palestinians who were expelled or who fled from homes in Israel and the West Bank, not just the children of those who were expelled or fled. As result of that error, the article misstated the group that makes up about 70 percent of Gaza's 1.8 million residents. It is the descendants of those who were expelled or fled, not the children.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 2/11/14): Israel opened its first industrial zone in occupied Palestinian territory shortly after the 1967 war, in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Atarot.

Correction (2/20/14): An article on Feb. 11 about a debate over whether Israeli companies operating in West Bank settlements do more to help or hurt the Palestinians they employ referred imprecisely to the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Atarot, where Israel opened an industrial zone after the 1967 war. While the Palestinians and most of the world consider it to be occupied Palestinian territory, Atarot was a Jewish village until 1948, and Israel considers all of Jerusalem to be its capital.

Fact: It is unclear on what basis the newspaper reached the conclusion that "most of the world" sees Atarot as Palestinian territory.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 12/9/13): Separately, Israel on Sunday blocked the installation of a high-tech cargo scanner donated by the Netherlands at the commercial crossing from Gaza into Israel, citing security concerns. The scanner was intended to increase Gaza exports to the West Bank.

Correction (Online as of 12/15/13): Earlier versions of this article incorrectly stated that Israel had blocked the installation of a high-tech cargo scanner donated by the Netherlands at the commercial crossing between Gaza and Israel. The scanner was installed several weeks ago and is being used on agricultural goods bound for Europe, but Israel has prevented its use for exports to Israel and the West Bank.



Error (International New York Times, Mark Landler and Jodi Rudoren, 11/6/13): An absence of progress on the core issues, an ill-timed Israeli plan to build 3,500 more settlements on the West Bank and East Jerusalem. . .

Correction (11/7/13): An article on Wednesday about American efforts to reinvigorate the Middle East peace negotiations stated incorrectly that Israel plans to build 3,500 additional settlements on the West Bank and in East Jerusalem. Israel does not plan more settlements, but it has recently advanced projects for that number of new housing units within existing settlements.



Error (New York Times Web site, Thomas Erdbrink and Jodi Rudoren, 8/2/13): In 2005, Mr. Ahmadinejad was famously quoted as saying Israel must be “wiped off the map,” during a conference called “A world without Zionism.” While it later became clear from tapes of his remarks that he had actually said “Israel must vanish from the pages of history,” it made his international image as a staunch anti-Semitic hard-liner.

Correction (Updated Web story, print story, 8/3/13): Mr. Rouhani, who has sought to portray himself as a moderate, did not use the most inflammatory anti-Israeli invective sometimes heard from other Iranian leaders, most notably Mr. Rouhani’s predecessor, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who has called Israel a cancerous tumor, a virus and an aberration that should be expunged from history.

Fact: The New York Times, in reporting several years earlier about Ahmadinejad's comments, consulted translators who explained that "'wipe off' or 'wipe away' is more accurate than 'vanish' because the Persian verb is active and transitive."



Error (New York Times Web site, Thomas Erdbrink and Jodi Rudoren, 8/2/13): But on Friday, the country’s incoming president, Hassan Rowhani, struck a more moderate tone, by merely calling the Israeli occupation of Palestinian lands "a sore."

Correction (Updated story, print story, 8/3/13): ... Mr. Rouhani told state television that “a sore has been sitting on the body of the Islamic world for many years,” a reference to Israel.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 5/9/13): ... years of mounting tension and legal battles over the treatment of women in Israel's public sphere, particularly the requirement that they sit in the back on bus lines through ultra-Orthodox neighborhoods, which set off civil disobedience campaigns involving many Jews from overseas.

Correction (5/11/13): An article on Thursday about Israel’s moving to end gender segregation in public spaces and public activities misstated the current policy regarding such segregation on buses. Israel’s Supreme Court ruled in 2011 that men and women could sit separately on buses only if they did so voluntarily; women are no longer required to sit in the back of buses.

Fact: The article and the correction failed to note that, although there is on a few specific bus lines a tacit but unenforceable agreement that men and women sit separately, on the vast majority of buses that travel through ultra-Orthodox neighborhoods there is no such separation.

Error (New York Times, Jodi Ruderon and Mark Landler, 12/1/12): Construction in E1, in West Bank territory that Israel captured in the 1967 war, would connect the large Jewish settlement of Maale Adumim to Jerusalem, dividing the West Bank in two. The Palestinian cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem would be cut off from the capital, making the contiguous Palestinian state endorsed by the United Nations last week virtually impossible.

Correction (12/8/12): Because of an editing error, an article last Saturday about Israel’s decision to move forward with planning and zoning for settlements in an area east of Jerusalem known as E1 described imprecisely the effect of such development on access to the cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem from Jerusalem. While development of E1 would limit access to Ramallah and Bethlehem to narrow corridors far from the Old City and downtown Jerusalem, it would not completely separate those cities from Jerusalem.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Ruderon, 12/2/12): Construction in E1, in West Bank territory that Israel captured in the 1967 war, would connect the large Jewish settlement of Maale Adumim to Jerusalem, dividing the West Bank in two. The Palestinian cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem would be cut off from the capital, making the contiguous Palestinian state endorsed by the United Nations last week virtually impossible. . . Like E1, [construction in Givat Hamatos] too would be a roadblock to plans for a contiguous Palestinian state . .

Correction (12/16/12 (in print); 12/10/12 (online)): An article on Dec. 2 about Israel’s decision to move forward with planning and zoning for settlements in an area east of Jerusalem known as E1 described imprecisely the effect of such development on access to the cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem from Jerusalem, and on the West Bank. Development of E1 would limit access to Ramallah and Bethlehem, leaving narrow corridors far from the Old City and downtown Jerusalem; it would not completely cut off those cities from Jerusalem. It would also create a large block of Israeli settlements in the center of the West Bank; it would not divide the West Bank in two. And because of an editing error, the article referred incompletely to the possibility of a contiguous Palestinian state. Critics see E1 as a threat to the meaningful contiguity of such a state because it would leave some Palestinian areas connected by roads with few exits or by circuitous routes; the proposed development would not technically make a contiguous Palestinian state impossible.