Tuesday, December 12, 2017
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Corrected

Diaa Hadid

Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 8/14/16): Gaza hospitals are perennially short of medicine, equipment and well-trained staff because of Israeli restrictions on travel and trade, and many Gaza residents struggle to get exit permits for care outside the territory.

Correction (Online 8/22/16): An earlier version of this article overstated the impact of Israeli restrictions on travel and trade in the Gaza Strip. Although they have made the import of some medical equipment difficult, the import of medicine is not restricted. The article also overstated what is known about the financing of Save a Child’s Heart. According to the charity’s director, Simon Fisher, it receives money from the governments of Israel, the European Union and the United States, as well as Christian ministries, Jewish congregations, public and private foundations and individuals worldwide, but he said did not know whether most of the money was from private Jewish donors. The article also misstated part of the name of the group led by Tony Laurance. It is Medical Aid for Palestinians, not Palestine.



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid and Majd Al Waheidi, 5/20/16): In April, Israel suspended the delivery of cement to Gaza for the reconstruction of homes destroyed in the 2014 war …

Correction (5/23/16): In April, Israel suspended the delivery of cement to Gaza for private individuals intending to reconstruct homes destroyed in the 2014 war …

 
An earlier version of this article referred incompletely to Israel’s suspension of cement deliveries to Gaza for reconstruction of homes destroyed in the 2014 war. The suspension only affected homes being rebuilt by private individuals; cement continued to flow to housing projects handled by foreign governments and international aid groups.



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 1/15/16): Nazira Maswadi's new landlord is trying to kick her out based on a claim that her estranged husband, Tawfiq, the original lessee, is dead. “He's not dead,” she insisted. “He has 10 children with me. If he died, they would have to bury him.”

Mr. Maswadi, reached by phone on Wednesday, confirmed he is alive, but acknowledged he now lives mostly with his third wife in the Shuafat refugee camp, which itself could threaten his family's occupancy of the Old City apartment. . . .
 
Nawal Hashimeh, 63, swept her little corner of a courtyard that she shared with her neighbors, a blanket strung across it to maintain a modicum of privacy. She said she faced eviction because she had replaced the rusting front door. . .
 
The most famous case is that of Nora Sub Laban, 60, whose family has lived since at least the early 1950s in an apartment with arched ceilings atop a winding staircase in a charming Levantine building. For over four decades, she has fought multiple Israeli attempts to oust her from her perch, and her two sons who work for advocacy groups have in recent months rallied activists and diplomats to the cause. A Jewish trust reclaimed the property in 2010 and moved to evict Ms. Sub Laban, claiming that she had not continuously lived in the apartment and had installed an air conditioner without permission. Ms. Sub Laban said she had never left the apartment and had dismantled the air conditioner.


Correction (Editor's Note, 1/26/16): The Jerusalem Journal article on Jan. 15 about Palestinian residents of Jerusalem's Old City who face eviction by Israeli organizations gave an incomplete description of the legal disputes in several cases. The descriptions were based on the tenants' accounts; the article should have included additional information from court documents or from the landlords. (The landlords are organizations that have reclaimed properties owned by Jews before Israel was established in 1948.)

In the case of Nazira Maswadi, the article said her new landlord was trying to evict her based on a claim that her estranged husband was dead (he is still alive). In fact, the landlord claims in court filings that the Maswadi family has not proved that it has paid rent.

In another case, the article quoted Nawal Hashimeh as saying she was being evicted for replacing a door to her apartment. But according to court documents, her rent payments had also been rejected because they were submitted by her son, whom the landlord said it had no contractual relationship with. (The landlord also claimed that three rent checks fell short of the amount owed.)

In a separate case, the article said Nora Sub Laban faced accusations that she had not continuously lived in her apartment, though she claimed that she had never left it. While the article said that Ms. Sub Laban had been battling eviction efforts for four decades and that the Israeli Supreme Court must now decide whether to consider her appeal, it should have noted that an Israeli court in 2014 upheld a lower-court finding that she had not returned to live at the property after renovations were completed in 2000 or 2001.

While the reporter tried to reach representatives of the landlord in the Sub Laban case, The Times should also have tried to reach the landlords involved in the other cases and their lawyers.



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 12/16/15): The change seemed to be a result of actions taken by Israeli officials, who have focused on reducing tensions surrounding Al Aqsa, one of the holiest sites for Muslims, while instituting a series of security measures that Palestinians have denounced as collective punishment.

Correction (Online as of 12/17/15): The change seems to be a result of actions taken by Israeli officials, who have focused on reducing tensions surrounding the compound, the holiest site in Judaism and one of the holiest sites for Muslims, while instituting a series of security measures that Palestinians have denounced as collective punishment.



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 12/1/15): The three teenagers are among the 15 women who have tried, or are accused of trying, to stab Israeli soldiers or civilians in the West Bank since an uprising began in October.

Correction (12/5/15): The three teenagers are among the 15 young women who have stabbed, tried to stab or, the Israeli authorities say, intended to stab Israeli soldiers or civilians in the West Bank and Jerusalem since an uprising began in October. . . 

 
An earlier version of this article referred incompletely to the location of the attacks and to the actions of the young women who have joined the violence. The attacks have been in Jerusalem as well as the West Bank, not just the West Bank, and the women have stabbed, tried to stab or, the Israeli authorities contend, intended to stab soldiers and civilians; they have not just tried or been accused of trying to attack. The second incomplete reference also appeared in an earlier version of the capsule summary with this article.



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 9/15/15): In East Jerusalem, Ms. Samri, the police spokeswoman, said protesters had thrown rocks at officers who had entered the contested holy site of the Al Aqsa Mosque -- revered by Jews as the Temple Mount and known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary, one of the three holiest sites in Islam . . .

Correction (9/16/15): In East Jerusalem, Ms. Samri, the police spokeswoman, said protesters had thrown rocks at officers who had entered the holy site — revered by Jews as the Temple Mount and known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary, one of the three holiest sites in Islam and the holiest site in Judaism . . .



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 3/16/15): Unlike Arabs in the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem, Palestinian citizens of Israel have full voting rights.

Correction (3/18/15): An article on Monday about a political awakening of Arabs in Israel this election year referred incorrectly to voting rights for Arabs in East Jerusalem. A small number — those who hold Israeli citizenship — are entitled to vote in Israeli elections; it is not the case that no Arabs in East Jerusalem can vote.