Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Corrected

Los Angeles Times

Error (Los Angeles Times, Kate Linthicum, 4/13/14): [Rapper Tamer Nafar] was channeling Scarlett Johansson for a video sketch skewering the actress for serving as a spokeswoman for SodaStream, a company boycotted by Palestinian activists because it is headquartered in an Israeli settlement in the West Bank.

Correction (4/24/14): Tamer Nafar: A profile of Palestinian rapper Tamer Nafar in the April 13 Arts and Books section said that SodaStream, a company that manufactures beverage carbonation machine, was headquartered in an Israeli settlement in the West Bank. The company has a factory in the West Bank but is headquartered in Lod, Israel.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Edmund Sanders, 2/5/13): A fourth-grade Palestinian textbook includes a story of a Palestinian who helped rescue a wounded Israeli soldier because, he says in the text, it was "my obligation as a Muslim Arab."

Correction (2/6/13): Mideast textbooks: In the Feb. 5 Section A, an article about a study of bias in Israelis and Palestinian textbooks said that a Palestinian textbook included a story of a Palestinian who helped rescue a wounded Israeli soldier. The example came from a fourth-grade Israeli textbook.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Maher Abukhater, 1/14/13): Police also removed 25 tents from the area.

Correction (1/16/13): Palestinian tents: An article in the Jan. 14 Section A about a police raid on a tent village set up by Palestinian activists on land that Israel has designated as the site of a new settlement said that the tents were removed. The activists were evicted, but the tents were left standing pending a court appeal.



Error (Los Angeles Times, wires, news brief, 12/31/12): In a major concession to the Gaza Strip's Hamas leaders, Israel dropped its 5-year-old ban on construction materials crossing into the territory . . .

Correction (1/4/13): A brief article in the Jan. 1 Section A said that Israel had dropped a 5-year-old ban on construction materials crossing into the Gaza Strip. That ban applied to the private sector; Israel had allowed some construction goods into Gaza for humanitarian projects during that time.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Edmund Sanders, 11/20/12): On Monday, Israel attacked the Sharouk communications building in Gaza City where it said four senior members of the Islamic Jihad militant group were meeting.

Among the dead was Ramez Harb, a Palestinian journalist. Israel said he was a legitimate target because he served in the information department of Islamic Jihad.

Correction (11/23/12): Gaza fighting: In the Nov. 20 Section A, an article about attacks by Israel and Hamas referred to Ramez Harb, who was killed in an Israeli strike on the Gaza Strip, as a journalist. Although initial reports said Harb worked for a Palestinian news agency, he was a member of the militant group Islamic Jihad.



Error (Los Angeles Times, news story with no byline, 10/9/12): Originally from Quneitra in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, [Syrian rebel fighter Hanadi] grew up in the poor Damascus neighborhood of Asali.

Correction (10/12/12): Syrian fighter: An article In the Oct. 9 Section A about a female Syrian rebel fighter said that she was originally from Quneitra in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights. Quneitra, in the Golan Heights, was captured by Israel in the 1967 war, but has been back in Syrian hands since 1974.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Jeffrey Fleishman and Edmund Sanders, 8/6/12): A Sinai militant group, which included at least one extremist from Saudi Arabia, released a video last week claiming responsibility for a June attack along the border that killed one Israeli soldier.

Correction (8/8/12): Israeli border violence: In the Aug. 6 Section A, an article about an attack by militants along Israel's border with Egypt said that an Israeli slain during a previous assault in June was a soldier. The victim was a civilian.



Error (Los Angeles Times Web site, headline, 4/30/12): Israeli-born Islamist [Sheik Raed Saleh] to resume his anti-discrimination campaign

Correction (4/30/12): Hero to Arab-Israelis Returns



Error (Los Angeles Times, Meghan Daum Op-Ed, 1/12/12): Though the ultra-Orthodox haredim make up just 10% of the Israeli population (they're also exempt from taxes and military service . . . )

Correction (1/17/12): Religion: Meghan Daum, in her Jan. 12 Op-Ed column about religious zealotry, wrote that haredim — ultra Orthodox Jews — in Israel are exempt from taxes and military service. The haredim are not legally exempt from either obligation; however, most receive exemption from military service because they are essentially full-time religious scholars. For much the same reason, many also do not earn enough money to qualify to pay income tax.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Calendar, 9/26/11): Based on the novel by Lew Wallace, the period drama revolves around Judah Ben-Hur (Heston), a Palestinian nobleman who is enslaved by the Romans, engages in one of the most thrilling chariot races ever captured on screen, and even encounters Jesus Christ.

Correction (9/28/11): "Ben-Hur": A Sept. 26 Calendar section article about a new DVD and Blu-ray release of the 1959 film "Ben-Hur" described the title character, played by Charlton Heston, as a Palestinian nobleman. The character Ben-Hur was a Jew from Judea who lived long before the place now known as Palestine was given that name.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Terrell Roberts, letter, 5/20/11): . . . .we just had a conservative newspaper in Israel delete Hillary Rodham Clinton's image from the picture of Obama administration officials in the Situation Room during the Osama bin Laden raid. . .

Correction (5/26/11): Photograph: A May 20 letter to the editor incorrectly said a conservative Israeli newspaper digitally scrubbed Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton from a photo of Obama administration officials monitoring the raid on Osama bin Laden. The newspaper that altered the photo is based in Brooklyn, N.Y.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Christopher Hawthorne, 2/2/11): "Decolonizing Architecture" is driven by a simple but provocative question: If and when Israel decides, or is compelled, to leave the occupied territories in the Gaza Strip and West Bank, what should returning Palestinians do with the buildings, roads and bridges the army and the settlers leave behind?

Correction (2/4/2011): "Decolonizing Architecture": A review of the exhibition "Decolonizing Architectue" in the Feb. 2 Calendar section implied that Israel continues to occupy the Gaza Strip. In fact, Israeli forces pulled out of the area in 2005.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Op-Ed by Rashid Khalidi, 6/17/03): While the media have remained obsessively focused on Hamas, there has been little coverage of Israeli hard-liners like Lt. Gen. Moshe Yaalon, the army's chief of staff who has publicly expressed his bitterness at the prospect of military operations in the occupied territories being halted if the "road map" for Middle East peace is implemented, and who has talked of rubbing in the fact that the Palestinians are "a defeated people." Officials like Yaalon are an obstacle to peace.

Correction (8/26/09): Hamas-Israel negotiations: An Op-Ed article titled "Can Hamas Cut a Deal for Peace?," which was published on June 17, 2003, paraphrased and partially quoted former Israeli army Chief of Staff Lt. Gen. Moshe Yaalon as having "talked of rubbing in the fact that the Palestinians are 'a defeated people.' " The Times was recently made aware of questions regarding the source and accuracy of this material. The Times has been unable to verify that Yaalon expressed the thought or used the quoted words. The quote and the paraphrase should not have been used.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Duke Helfand, 5/11/09): Benedict's Middle East pilgrimage began in Jordan and will also take him to the West Bank, where he'll visit the Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial and Jerusalem's Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site.

Correction (5/14/09): Pope Benedict XVI: The Beliefs column in Monday's Section A about the pope's visit to Israel and the West Bank suggested that the Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial and the Western Wall are on [sic] the West Bank. Yad Vashem is in west Jerusalem; the Western Wall is in the contested Old City of Jerusalem.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Nicholas Goldberg, Backgrounder, 4/5/09): Avigdor Lieberman, a right-winger from the Yisrael Beiteinu party who rejects the idea of a Palestinian state. . .

Correction (4/9/09): Israel: A Sunday Op-Ed article about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu mentioned an ancient tunnel reopened beneath the Western Wall and the Al Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem. The tunnel runs adjacent to the wall. The same article said that Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman rejects the idea of a Palestinian state. Lieberman has said that he rejects the idea that Israel has committed itself to a two-state solution.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Mousa Abu Marzook, Op-Ed, 1/6/09): In the six-month period preceding this week's bombardment, one Israel was killed. . .

Correction (1/14/09): Israeli deaths: A Jan. 6 Opinion article by Mousa Abu Marzook suggested that only one Israeli had died as a result of Palestinian violence in the six months preceding the current Israeli operation in Gaza. In fact, five Israelis died during that period.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Borzou Daragahi, 11/20/08): "The only explanation for the presence of these modified uranium particles is that they were contained in the missiles dropped from the Israeli planes," the [International Atomic Energy Agency] report [on the bombed Syrian facility] said.

Correction (11/27/08): Uranium particles: A Nov. 20 Section A article about International Atomic Energy Agency reports on Syria and Iran misattributed an explanation for the presence of uranium particles in Syria to the IAEA. The explanation that the modified uranium particles must have been "contained in the missiles dropped from the Israeli planes" was from a Syrian government letter that was quoted by the report.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Ashraf Khalil, 7/7/08): In the meantime, Israelis, who feel safer thanks to a massive concrete barrier sealing off their nation from much of the West Bank, are openly debating what many believe is a renewed threat from within.

Correction (7/11/08): West Bank barrier: An article in Monday's Section A about divisions between Jews and Arabs in Jerusalem said a "massive concrete barrier" separates Israel from much of the West Bank. The barrier is a series of walls, trenches and fences and is not all concrete.

Fact: Less than 10 percent of the barrier is a concrete wall.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Richard Boudreaux, 1/28/08): Israel began reducing the flow of electricity . . . across Gaza's borders after the militant Islamic movement Hamas, which had won parliamentary elections in 2006, seized full control of the territory in June.

Correction (3/25/08): Gaza electricity: A Section A article on Jan. 28 reported that Israel had begun reducing the flow of electricity to the Gaza Strip after the Islamic movement Hamas seized full control of the territory in June. Although Israeli sanctions had caused electricity shortages by curtailing supplies of diesel fuel to Gaza's only power plant, Israel did not reduce the amount of electricity it sells to Gaza until early February.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Richard Boudreaux, 10/31/07): Unlike Israeli Arabs, who number 1.4 million and make up one-fifth of the country's population, Druze serve in the military.

Correction (11/3/07): Israeli army: An article in Wednesday's Section A about a raid on a Druze village in Israel said that Arabs did not serve in the Israeli army. Military service is not compulsory for Arab citizens of Israel, but they can enlist voluntarily. A small number of them do so.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Teresa Watanabe, 9/16/07): . . . younger Jews . . . grew up to see Israel command the Mideast's largest military.

Correction (10/13/07): Israel's military: An article in the California section Sept. 16 about young American Jews reconnecting with Israel stated that Israel has the largest military in the Mideast. Although some experts rank Israel's military as the most powerful in the region, it does not have the largest budget or number of personnel.



Error (Los Angeles Times, sidebar, 5/1/07): Hezbollah militants begin a series of deadly rocket strikes into Israel that will continue for the duration of the conflict, striking as far south as Haifa, Israel's third-largest city.

Correction (5/11/07): Lebanon: A background box accompanying a May 1 article in Section A about Israel Prime Minister Ehud Olmert incorrectly said that during last summer's war in Lebanon, Hezbollah fired rockets "as far south as Haifa, Israel's third-largest city." Some of the rockets landed farther south than Haifa.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Rone Tempest, 8/2/06): Family members in Beirut are hopeful that Israel will release [Samir] Kuntar, who is serving multiple life sentences for murder and terrorism in Hadarim Prison for his role in the 1979 raid on a Jewish settlement that left four people dead, including a 4-year-old girl.

Correction (8/11/06): Prisoners in Israel: An Aug. 2 article in Section A about Arabs in Israeli custody identified Nahariya as a Jewish settlement. It is a town in northern Israel.



Error (Los Angeles Times, headline, 7/29/06): Israel Rejects Peace Offer

Correction (8/2/06): Middle East warfare: A Page One headline on Saturday saying "Israel Rejects Peace Offer" inaccurately summarized Israel's response to Lebanon's seven-point proposal. No formal offer had been presented to the Israeli government, so none had been rejected.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Op-Ed by Henry Siegman, 6/18/06): The death of an entire Palestinian family -- a father and his six children -- on a Gaza beach earlier this month, followed just a few days later by an Israeli missile strike that killed nine more Palestinian civilians, has reopened the controversy ....

[S]ince Israel's disengagement from Gaza last year ... Palestinian civilians have been killed by Israeli artillery and airstrikes virtually on a daily basis.

Correction (7/17/06): A June 18 article on the Mideast conflict stated that a father and his six children were killed in a June 9 Israeli artillery strike on a Gaza beach. A man, his wife and five children in their family died. The article also said that Palestinian civilians have been killed "virtually every day" since Israel's disengagement from Gaza. Statistics from B'Tselem, the Israeli human rights group, show that Palestinian civilians have been killed on fewer than half the days since the disengagement last year.

Fact: The newspaper's correction claims the Palestinians were killed in an "Israeli artillery strike on a Gaza beach." But Israel has denied the explosion was caused by an IDF shell, and even Siegman avoided blaming an incoming Israeli shell. The correction also refers to the number of days in which "Palestinian civilians have been killed." Siegman's Op-Ed, however, referred more specifically to civilians killed by Israeli artillery or airstrikes, something which has happened on only few of the days since Israel's withdrawal from Gaza. Regardless, the correction's claim that Israel has killed Palestinian civilians on "fewer than half the days since the disengagement" is misleadingly imprecise. Based on B'tselem documentation, on fewer than 25 percent of those days were Palestinian civilians killed by Israel.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Laura King, 3/11/06): An estimated 3.2 million Palestinians live in the West Bank.

Correction (3/27/06): West Bank: An article in the March 11 Section A incorrectly reported the Palestinian population of the West Bank as 3.2 million. The population numbers are heavily disputed, but the most generally accepted estimate is 2.3 million.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Arden Reed, 12/11/05): Fifty-three artists and art groups participated, some from Western Europe or the New World, but most from the old Ottoman Empire or environs: Croatia Albania, Kazakhstan, Iran, Israel, Palestine, Romania.

Correction (12/23/05): Istanbul Biennial -- An article in the Dec. 11 Calendar section about an international art exhibition included Palestine in a list of nations from which artists had contributed works. It should have said the Palestinian territories.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Aaron David Miller, 5/11/05): Without access to military or national service and constantly under suspicion as a potential fifth column, the status of Israeli Arabs is indeed nation-dividing.

Correction (5/19/05): Gaza Strip pullout – A May 11 Commentary article about Israel’s proposed withdrawal from the Gaza Strip said Israeli Arabs are “without access to military or national service.” In fact, although they cannot be drafted and most choose not to serve, Israeli Arabs can enlist in the Israeli armed forces.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Peter Wallsten and Tyler Marshall, 4/11/05): For Sharon too, the domestic stakes are high. By asserting Israel’s right to expand Maale Adumim, Sharon is underscoring his stated goal of giving up Gaza while consolidating Israel’s grip on major settlements in the West Bank, an area of greater importance to most Israelis, analysts said. Both territories were annexed in the 1967 war.

Correction (4/13/05): Texas summit — An article in Monday’s Section A about Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s meeting with President Bush said Israel annexed the Gaza Strip and West Bank in 1967. In fact, the territories were captured and occupied by Israel but not formally annexed, except for East Jerusalem and some adjacent West Bank land.



Error (Los Angeles Times, on-line photo essay, 12/27/04): With children at his side, an Orthodox Jew prays at the Western Wall, Judaism’s most holy site, in Jerusalem’s Old City. This section of retainer wall is all that’s left of the Second Temple, which was destroyed by Romans in 70 AD.

Correction (Posted as of 1/10/05): With children at his side, an Orthodox Jews prays at the Western Wall, Judaism’s most holy site where Jewish prayer is permitted.



Error (Los Angeles Times, letter by Marc Springer of Chantilly, Va., 11/29/04): The numbers say it all, in more than four years of violence, some 900 Israelis have been killed, the majority soldiers, and more than 3,5000 Palestinians, the majority civilians. . . .

Correction (12/4/04): Mideast conflict – A letter Nov. 29 said soldiers were the majority of the 900 Israelis killed in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict since 2000. The majority have been civilians.



Error (Los Angeles Times, H.G. Reza and Christine Hanley, 9/26/04): The family, which, according to court documents, has ties to Palestine and Jordan, diverted some of the cash to Israel and other Middle East countries, sources close to the investigtaion said.

Correction (9/29/04): Bail bonds investigation–An article in the California section Sunday about the arrest of American Liberty Bail Bonds owner Adnan “Dan” Yousef and members of his family reported that they had ties to Palestine. The reference should have been to the Palestinian territories.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Laura King, 9/20/04): Madonna tried to make a predawn pilgrimage Sunday to the Western Wall in Jerusalem’s Old City, which is held to be the sole remnant of the Jews’ Second Temple.

Correction (9/24/04): Western Wall–An article in Monday’s Section A about a visit to Jerusalem by pop star Madonna described the Western Wall in the Old City as the sole remnant of Jews’ Second Temple. It is the principal remnant of the temple complex accessible to worshipers, but other archeological elements survive.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Laura King, 4/24/04): Palestinians were angered and demoralized by the U.S. endorsement last week of Sharon’s “disengagement” plan, which they say bypasses negotiations on a range of key issues, including the fate of millions of Palestinian refugees who fled or were driven out during Israel’s 1948 war of independence.

Correction (4/29/04): Palestinian refugees–An article Saturday in Section A about an Israeli threat against Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat incorrectly stated that millions of Palestinians fled or were driven out of their homes during Israel’s 1948 War of Independence. In fact, that figure refers to the refugees, who numbered in the hundreds of thousands, and their descendants.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Mark Magnier and Ken Ellingwood, 3/23/04): Suicide bombings and other attacks have claimed nearly 950 Israeli lives since September 2000, while more than 2,750 Palestinians have died in clashes with Israeli troops.

Correction (4/9/04): Palestinian deaths – A March 23 article in Section A incorrectly stated that more than 2,750 Palestinians had died in clashes with Israeli troops during the Palestinian uprising. The correct figure is 2,445. The 2,750 figure represents the total number of Palestinians killed in all violence related to the 3 1/2-year uprising.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Mike Anton, 3/31/04): And, while waning, it [polygamy] is still practiced in the Muslim world and illegally in Israel by some ultra-Orthodox Jews, among other places.

Correction (4/9/04): Polygamy -- an article in the March 31 Calendar section about the history of marriage said polygamy is still practiced illegally in Israel by some ultra-Orthodox Jews. While there are a very small number of Yemenite polygamists in Israel, they are not part of the tradition of the broader ultra-Orthodox community.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Laura King, 4/5/04): What is traditionally one of the Jewish year’s most joyous occasions–the eight-day celebration of Passover, which begins tonight at sundown–is shadowed by a sense of foreboding.

Correction (4/7/04): Passover–An article in Section A on Monday about Passover jitters in Israel referred to the holiday as an eight-day celebration. Passover is celebrated for seven days in Israel, and eight days in the diaspora.



Error (Los Angeles Times, George Bisharat, oped, 1/25/04): . . . they [Israeli Arabs] cannot serve in the armed forces.

Correction (2/1/04): Israeli Arabs — A Jan. 25 Opinion article by George Bisharat, “Right of Return” stated that Israeli citizens who are Palestinians cannot serve in the Israeli armed forces. In fact, although they cannot be drafted and most choose not to serve, Israeli Palestinians can enlist in the service.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Calendar, 1/8/04): Of the 56 films under consideration to be best foreign language film nominees, 52 will be screened at the 12-day event, including “Osama” (Afghanistan), “Divine Intervention” (Palestine). . .

Correction (1/13/04): Palestinian film–Articles about Palm Springs International Film Festival that ran in Calendar on Dec. 20 and Jan. 8 referred to the movie “Divine Intervention” as coming from Palestine. They should have said the Palestinian territories.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Sonni Efron, 12/13/03): Washington is pressuring Sharon to make good on the commitment made to Bush in Aqaba, Jordan, in the spring to begin dismantling Jewish settlements in the Palestinian territories, knowledgeable sources said.

Correction (12/17/03): Jewish settlements–An article in Saturday’s Section A about the Israeli foreign minister’s visit to Washington misstated a commitment Prime Minister Ariel Sharon made at a June summit in Aqaba, Jordan. Sharon agreed to dismantle some illegal outposts of Jewish settlements; he did not agree to begin dismantling settlements themselves.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Times Wire Services, 10/12/03): That [Camp David] plan outlined a proposal for a Palestinian state in the Gaza Strip and about 95% of the West Bank as well as parts of East Jerusalem, including limited sovereignty over a Muslim shrine that abuts the Western Wall, Judaism’s holiest site.

Correction (11/14/03): Holy site–An Oct. 12 wire report in Section A about Israeli-Palestinian violence incorrectly indicated Judaism’s holiest site. It is the Temple Mount, not the Western Wall.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Henry Chu and Ruth Morris, 5/2/03): The [road map] document calls on Israel to withdraw from the West Bank and to end its settlements.

Correction (5/3/03): Middle East “road map” – Recent articles, including one in Friday’s Section A, stated that the Middle East peace initiative calls on Israel to withdraw from the West Bank and end its settlements. The document calls on Israel to withdraw from Palestinian areas occupied after Sept. 28, 2000. The plan also calls on Israel to dismantle settlement outposts erected since March 2001 and freeze all settlement activity.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Henry Chu, 5/1/03): The [road map] plan is a timetable for Israel to withdraw from the West Bank and end its settlements while Palestinians are to curb violence against Israel.

Correction (5/3/03): Middle East “road map” –Recent articles, including one in Friday’s Section A, stated that the Middle East peace initiative calls on Israel to withdraw from the West Bank and end its settlements. The document calls on Israel to withdraw from Palestinian areas occupied after Sept. 28, 2000. The plan also calls on Israel to dismantle settlement outposts erected since March 2001 and freeze all settlement activity.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Don Heckman, 12/13/02): Also represented are lesser-known but equally compelling artists such as Yat Kha (Tuva), Gigi (Ethiopia), Amal Murkus (Palestine) and Sabah Habas Mustapha (Indonesia).

Correction (12/14/02): Singer’s citizenship–In Friday’s Calendar, an article on the year’s best world-music CDs said Amal Murkus is from Palestine. The singer is actually an Arab who is a citizen of Israel.



Error (Los Angeles Times, editorial, 12/14/01): Leaders in Jordan, Egypt and Europe are rightly furious with Arafat for not quelling violence that threatens to spread outside Palestine and Israel. . .

Correction (12/15/01): Mideast–An editorial Friday mistakenly referred to Palestine. It should have said Palestinian territories.