Monday, December 11, 2017
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Corrected

Christian Science Monitor

Error (Christian Science Monitor, Global News Blog, Ben Rosen, 7/10/16): In an effort to revive stalled peace efforts between Israel and Palestine, Egypt's foreign minister will travel to Israel for the first time in nine years. …

 
The warm response shared by the infighting countries [ie Israel and the Palestinians] contrasts their receptions to Western efforts to bring about peace …
 
Ultimately, however, Egypt's success to broker peace will hinge on its ability to convince Israel and Palestine to concede more than they were willing to in the past.


Correction (7/11/16): In an effort to revive stalled peace efforts between Israel and the Palestinian Authority, Egypt's foreign minister will travel to Israel for the first time in nine years. …
 
The warm response shared by the two sides contrasts their receptions to Western efforts to bring about peace …
 
Ultimately, however, Egypt's success to broker peace will hinge on its ability to convince Israel and the PA to concede more than they were willing to in the past.



Error (Christian Science Monitor, Global News Blog, Ben Rosen, 7/10/16):

Sameh Shoukry, visiting Israel on behalf of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, is set to meet with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Tel Aviv twice on Sunday, Mr. Netanyahu announced in Jerusalem earlier in the day. …
 
According to the Palestinian news outlet Ma'an, Egyptian sources said Shoukry's visit to Tel Aviv may be in preparation for Netanyahu to visit Cairo to meet with Sisi.


Correction (7/11/16): Sameh Shoukry, visiting Israel on behalf of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, is set to meet with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu twice on Sunday, Mr. Netanyahu announced in Jerusalem earlier in the day. …
 
According to the Palestinian news outlet Ma'an, Egyptian sources said Shoukry's visit to Israel may be in preparation for Netanyahu to visit Cairo to meet with Sisi. The Israeli Foreign Ministry refused to comment on any upcoming trip.
 
[Appended]: Editor's note: An earlier version of this story misstated the locale of the meetings between Shoukry and Netanyahu. They took place in Jerusalem.



Error (Christian Science Monitor, Global News Blog, headline and subheadline, 7/10/16): Is Egypt the right country to broker peace between Israel and Palestine?

 
Egypt's success will hinge on its ability to convince Israel and Palestine to concede to previous sticking points that have historically stalled talks


Correction (7/11/16): Is Egypt the right country to broker peace between Israel and the Palestinian Authority?
 
Egypt's success will hinge on its ability to convince Israel and the Palestinians to concede to previous sticking points that have historically stalled talks



Error (Christian Science Monitor, Global News Blog, headline, 7/6/15): Why new Israeli settlements draw ire

Correction (7/11/16): Why new building in Israeli settlements draws ire

 
[Appended] This article was updated to clarify the nature and location of the plans for new building.



Error (Christian Science Monitor Jerome Slater Op-Ed, 1/7/13): Ban lifted: A truck loaded with building materials drives at the Rafah crossing with Egypt, in the southern Gaza Strip Dec. 30. Israel had banned construction materials for Gaza after Hamas seized control there in 2007.

As part of a November ceasefire agreement with Hamas, Israel has partially lifted its blockade of the Gaza Strip, at least allowing construction materials into the region pummeled by Israeli airstrikes. It's a single, forward step that ends a five-year ban on such materials."

Among other measures, it has refused to allow Gaza a functioning airport, seaport, or commercial crossing on its border with Egypt, radically cutting Gazan trade and commerce with the outside world.



Correction (1/10/13): Ban lifted: A truck loaded with building materials drives at the Rafah crossing with Egypt, in the southern Gaza Strip Dec. 30. Israel had banned construction materials for Gaza's private sector after Hamas seized control there in 2007.

As part of a November ceasefire agreement with Hamas, Israel has partially lifted its blockade of the Gaza Strip, allowing private construction materials into the region pummeled by Israeli airstrikes. It's a single, forward step that ends a five-year ban on such materials."

"Among other measures, it has refused to allow Gaza a functioning airport or seaport, radically cutting Gazan trade and commerce with the outside world. [An earlier version of this paragraph was incorrect. See editor's note at the bottom of this article."

Editor's note: An earlier version of this article, based on reporting from the Associated Press, incorrectly described Israel's lifting of a 2007 ban on construction materials into Gaza. AP has issued a correction saying that the ban applied to materials for Gaza's private sector. Since the Hamas takeover of Gaza in 2007, Israel has allowed humanitarian-related construction materials and materials under UN auspices. Lifting the ban allows private business to ship materials to Gaza. Also, an earlier version incorrectly described Israeli embargo efforts at the Gaza-Egypt border. Israel does not control that border.



Error (Christian Science Monitor, Aaron David Miller op-ed, 5/17/05): The status of Israeli Arabs, without access to military or national service, and constantly under suspicion as a potential fifth column, is indeed nation-dividing.

Correction (5/20/05): A May 17 Opinion page article, "Why the Gaza pullout matters" sugggest that Israeli Arabs cannot serve in Israel's army. In fact, they are not barred by law from doing so.

Error (Christian Science Monitor, David Clark Scott, 7/19/04): “We stopped at a little store in Efrat, another settler outpost, and he emerged with bottles of mineral water and orange juice,” says Ben.

Correction (7/19/04): Not an Outpost: In this column on July 9, under the title “Principles in Conflict,” we erroneously described a West Bank town where Ben and his Peace Now guide stopped for refreshments. Efrat is a large, well-established settlement under Israeli law.