Saturday, February 24, 2018
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Corrected

Ariel Sharon

Error (New York Times, Ali Jarbawi, Op-Ed, 1/22/14): In 2000, [Ariel Sharon] entered Al Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem, a holy Muslim site, which triggered the second intifada.

Correction (1/28/14): Because of an editing error, an opinion article on Wednesday incorrectly described a 2000 visit by Ariel Sharon to the contested religious site known as the Temple Mount. He toured the complex, which includes the Al Aqsa Mosque, but did not enter the mosque itself.



Error (New York Magazine, Caroline Bankoff, 1/11/14): In 1983, [Ariel Sharon] was forced to resign from his role as defense minister after he was found to be "indirectly responsible" for the massacres in Sabra and Shatila, two Palestinian refugee camps in West Beirut where hundreds of civilians were killed by Israel soldiers during Israel's invasion of Lebanon.

Correction (Online as of 1/20/14): .  . two Palestinian refugee camps in West Beirut where hundreds of civilians were killed by Lebanese Christian militia* during Israel's invasion of Lebanon.

 
(Correction appended to online article): This story originally said, incorrectly, that the civilians were killed by Israeli soldiers.
 


Error (AP, 9/28/05): The uprising followed a Sept. 28, 2000 visit by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, then in opposition, to the al Aqsa Mosque, one of Islam’s most sacred sites in Jerusalem’s Old City.

Correction (Updated story, 9/28/05): The uprising followed a Sept. 28, 2000 visit by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, then in opposition, to the Aqsa Mosque compound, one of the holiest sites in Islam. The compound also is sacred to Jews as the site of the ancient Jewish temples.



Error (New London Day, Hassan Fouda op-ed, 7/24/05): During Israel's two-decade-long occupation of southern Lebanon, Israeli forces murdered over 20,000 Lebanese and Palestinians, including more than 1,000 in a single day in the refugee camps of Sabra and Shatila, overseen by none other than then Israeli Defense Minister Ariel Sharon.

Correction (8/9/05): Hassan Fouda's July 24 column inaccurately claimed that Israeli forces murdered 1,000 people in a single day in the refugee camps of Sabra and Shatila in Southern Lebanon in 1982. In fact, no Israelis were directly involved and the murders were carried out by Lebanese Christian militiamen. Israel's Kahan Commission later concluded that Defense Minister Ariel Sharon was indirectly responsible since he should have taken stronger steps to prevent the violence.

Error (Las Vegas Review-Journal, AP article by Josef Federman, 7/8/04): By September 2005, Sharon plans to pull all Israeli troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

Correction (7/15/04): In a July 8 story about Israel’s plan to pull its troops out of the Gaza Strip, The Associated Press erroneously reported that Israel also is planning to pull out of the West Bank. The plan calls for a limited withdrawal from four West Bank settlements.



Error (San Francisco Chronicle, AP article by Josef Federman, 7/9/04): By September 2005, Sharon plans to pull all Israeli troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

Correction (7/15/04): An Associated Press story published Friday erroneously reported that Israel plans to pull all its soldiers out of the West Bank. The Israeli plan calls for a limited withdrawal of residents and military guards from four West Bank settlements.



Error (Boston Globe, AP article by Josef Federman, 7/8/04): By September 2005, Sharon plans to pull all troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

Correction (7/16/04): Because of an error by the Associated Press, a story on the July 8 World page about Israel’s plan to pull its troops out of the Gaza Strip incorrectly reported that Israel is also planning to pull out of the West Bank. The plan calls for only a limited withdrawal from four West Bank settlements.



Error (AP, Josef Federman, 7/8/04): By September 2005, Sharon plans to pull all Israeli troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

Correction (7/14/04): In a July 8 story about Israel’s plan to pull its troops out of the Gaza Strip, The Associated Press erroneously reported that Israel is also planning to pull out of the West Bank. The plan only calls for a limited withdrawal from four West Bank settlements.



Error (Chicago Tribune, AP article by Josef Federman, 7/9/04): By September 2005, Sharon plans to pull all Israeli troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

Correction (7/14/04): A stroy on Page 3 Friday reported incorrectly that Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon plans to pull all Israeli troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank by September 2005. The plan does not call for a general troop withdrawal from the West Bank. However, it would withdraw all settlers from Gaza along with the soldiers who guard them. In addition, it would evacuate four isolated settlements in the West Bank and redeploy the soldiers guarding them.



Error (Philadelphia Inquirer, AP article by Josef Federman, 7/9/04): By September 2005, Sharon plans to pull all Israeli troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

Correction (7/13/04): An article in the July 9 Inquirer erred in describing Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s plan to withdraw troops from the West Bank. Under the plan, troops would be withdrawn from four West Bank settlements.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Sonni Efron, 12/13/03): Washington is pressuring Sharon to make good on the commitment made to Bush in Aqaba, Jordan, in the spring to begin dismantling Jewish settlements in the Palestinian territories, knowledgeable sources said.

Correction (12/17/03): Jewish settlements–An article in Saturday’s Section A about the Israeli foreign minister’s visit to Washington misstated a commitment Prime Minister Ariel Sharon made at a June summit in Aqaba, Jordan. Sharon agreed to dismantle some illegal outposts of Jewish settlements; he did not agree to begin dismantling settlements themselves.



Error (Chicago Daily Law Bulletin, Douglass W. Cassel Jr., 2/15/01): In a more judicious op-ed published in the Chicago Tribune and other papers, James Ron, professor of sociology and political science at Johns Hopkins University, summarizes allegations that Sharon had command responsibility for war crimes against Palestinians in the West Bank village of Qibya in 1953, and in Beirut and its Sabra and Shatila refugee camp in 1982.

Correction (2/26/01): A Feb. 15 article by Douglass W. Cassel Jr. incorrectly reported that Ariel Sharon was found to have had "command responsibility for war crimes against Palestinians in the West Bank village of Qibya in 1953, and in Beirut and its Sabra and Shatila refugee camp in 1982." The investigations that the article cited did not conclude that Sharon had any direct responsibility for the incidents.



Error (Chicago Tribune, James Ron, 2/8/01;Los Angeles Times, 2/5/01): In 1985, a U.S. Military Law Review analysis argued that Sharon had "command responsibility" for the [Sabra and Shatila] killings."

Correction (Tribune, 2/15/01:LA Times, 2/9/01): In a Commentary Page article on Feb. 8, James Ron incorrectly stated that a 1985 U.S. Military Law Review analysis "argued that [Ariel] Sharon had ‘command responsibility’" for the Sabra and Shatila refugee camp massacres in Lebanon. The article did not evaluate Sharon’s responsibility. Ariel Sharon–A U.S. Military Law Review analysis in 1985 did not find that Ariel Sharon had "command responsibility" for the killings in the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps, as James Ron wrote in his article Feb. 5.