Tuesday, April 25, 2017
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Corrected

Jerusalem

Error (U.S. News & World Report, Curt Mills, 3/20/17): His country fought a war against Hezbollah in 2006, Tel Aviv's second formal armed conflict with Lebanon.

Correction (3/22/17): His country fought a war with Hezbollah in 2006, Israel's second formal armed conflict with Lebanon.

Error (U.S. News & World Report, Curt Mills, 3/20/17): Tel Aviv's man in Moscow was asked to defend a recent firefight between Syrian government forces and Israeli jets.

Correction (3/22/17): Israel's man in Moscow was asked to defend a recent firefight between Syrian government forces and Israeli jets.



Error (AP, Richard Lardner, 12/13/16): Israel and several other U.S. allies are also buying the F-35, expanding the program's international footprint. Defense Secretary Ash Carter visited Israel on Monday as Tel Aviv received the first two next-generation F-35 fighter jets that will help preserve the country's military edge in the volatile Mideast.

Correction (12/13/16): Israel and several other U.S. allies are also buying the F-35, expanding the program's international footprint. Defense Secretary Ash Carter visited Israel on Monday as the Jewish state received the first two next-generation F-35 fighter jets that will help preserve the country's military edge in the volatile Mideast.



Error (New York Times, Debra Kamin, travel, 9/14/16): Like most of the 800,000 citizens uncomfortably sharing real estate in Israel's contested capital, where Arabs and Jews are staked out on opposite sides and communities are strictly segregated between the religious and secular, everyday travel for Mr. Muna is circumscribed by lines real and invisible.

Correction (Online 9/15/16): Like most of the 800,000 citizens uncomfortably sharing real estate in Israel's contested capital, where Arabs and Jews are staked out on opposite sides and communities are often divided between the religious and secular, everyday travel for Mr. Muna is circumscribed by lines real and invisible. …

 
An earlier version of this described Jewish communities in Jerusalem incorrectly. Though Israel has separate school systems for secular, religious,and ultra-Orthodox students, and there are some ultra-Orthodox enclaves, communities are not strictly "segregated" between the religious and secular. 



Error (Los Angeles Times, Joshua Mitnick, 8/11/16): The [Western] wall, with its giant stone blocks, is the last remnant of the Jewish Temple complex built two millenniums ago…

Correction (8/13/16): Western Wall: In the Aug. 11 Section A, an article about women praying at the Western Wall in Jerusalem described the wall as the last remnant of the ancient Jewish Temple complex. There are other remnants.



Error (Times of Israel, Dov Lieber, 7/10/16): Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry made a rare visit to Tel Aviv Sunday …

Correction (7/12/16): Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry made a rare visit to Jerusalem Sunday …



Error (Times of Israel, subheadline, 7/10/16): Trip to Tel Aviv by Sameh Shoukry intended to help Cairo push forward peace initiatives …

Correction (7/12/16): Trip to Jerusalem by Sameh Shoukry intended to help Cairo push forward peace initiatives …



Error (Christian Science Monitor, Global News Blog, Ben Rosen, 7/10/16):

Sameh Shoukry, visiting Israel on behalf of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, is set to meet with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Tel Aviv twice on Sunday, Mr. Netanyahu announced in Jerusalem earlier in the day. …
 
According to the Palestinian news outlet Ma'an, Egyptian sources said Shoukry's visit to Tel Aviv may be in preparation for Netanyahu to visit Cairo to meet with Sisi.


Correction (7/11/16): Sameh Shoukry, visiting Israel on behalf of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, is set to meet with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu twice on Sunday, Mr. Netanyahu announced in Jerusalem earlier in the day. …
 
According to the Palestinian news outlet Ma'an, Egyptian sources said Shoukry's visit to Israel may be in preparation for Netanyahu to visit Cairo to meet with Sisi. The Israeli Foreign Ministry refused to comment on any upcoming trip.
 
[Appended]: Editor's note: An earlier version of this story misstated the locale of the meetings between Shoukry and Netanyahu. They took place in Jerusalem.



Error (New York Times, Mark Landler and Maggie Haberman, 3/22/16): In March 2010, while serving as secretary of state, [Hillary Clinton] sharply criticized the Israeli authorities for approving new Jewish housing in an Arab neighborhood of Eastern Jerusalem when the United States was trying to get the Israelis and Palestinians back to the negotiating table.

Correction (3/22/16): An earlier version of this article misstated the type of neighborhood where Hillary Clinton sharply criticized the Israeli authorities for approving new Jewish housing when the United States was trying to get the Israelis and Palestinians back to the negotiating table. It was a Jewish neighborhood, not an Arab neighborhood.



Error (AFP, 3/20/16): The mosque is the third-holiest site in Islam after the Grand Mosque in Mecca and the Prophet's Mosque in Medina.

It is also revered by Jews as the site of their First and Second Temples and is Judaism's holy site.



Correction (3/20/16): Considered the third holiest site in Islam, and revered by Jews as their holiest site, known as the Temple Mount, the compound is a crucible of tensions in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.



Error (AFP, 2/24/16): As part of our series on teenagers, we asked a random selection of middle-class youngsters from various capitals how they see their world …

 
Elad, 14, Tel Aviv


Correction (2/24/16): As part of our series on teenagers, we asked a random selection of middle-class youngsters from various cities how they see their world …
 
Elad, 14, Tel Aviv



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 1/15/16): Nazira Maswadi's new landlord is trying to kick her out based on a claim that her estranged husband, Tawfiq, the original lessee, is dead. “He's not dead,” she insisted. “He has 10 children with me. If he died, they would have to bury him.”

Mr. Maswadi, reached by phone on Wednesday, confirmed he is alive, but acknowledged he now lives mostly with his third wife in the Shuafat refugee camp, which itself could threaten his family's occupancy of the Old City apartment. . . .
 
Nawal Hashimeh, 63, swept her little corner of a courtyard that she shared with her neighbors, a blanket strung across it to maintain a modicum of privacy. She said she faced eviction because she had replaced the rusting front door. . .
 
The most famous case is that of Nora Sub Laban, 60, whose family has lived since at least the early 1950s in an apartment with arched ceilings atop a winding staircase in a charming Levantine building. For over four decades, she has fought multiple Israeli attempts to oust her from her perch, and her two sons who work for advocacy groups have in recent months rallied activists and diplomats to the cause. A Jewish trust reclaimed the property in 2010 and moved to evict Ms. Sub Laban, claiming that she had not continuously lived in the apartment and had installed an air conditioner without permission. Ms. Sub Laban said she had never left the apartment and had dismantled the air conditioner.


Correction (Editor's Note, 1/26/16): The Jerusalem Journal article on Jan. 15 about Palestinian residents of Jerusalem's Old City who face eviction by Israeli organizations gave an incomplete description of the legal disputes in several cases. The descriptions were based on the tenants' accounts; the article should have included additional information from court documents or from the landlords. (The landlords are organizations that have reclaimed properties owned by Jews before Israel was established in 1948.)

In the case of Nazira Maswadi, the article said her new landlord was trying to evict her based on a claim that her estranged husband was dead (he is still alive). In fact, the landlord claims in court filings that the Maswadi family has not proved that it has paid rent.

In another case, the article quoted Nawal Hashimeh as saying she was being evicted for replacing a door to her apartment. But according to court documents, her rent payments had also been rejected because they were submitted by her son, whom the landlord said it had no contractual relationship with. (The landlord also claimed that three rent checks fell short of the amount owed.)

In a separate case, the article said Nora Sub Laban faced accusations that she had not continuously lived in her apartment, though she claimed that she had never left it. While the article said that Ms. Sub Laban had been battling eviction efforts for four decades and that the Israeli Supreme Court must now decide whether to consider her appeal, it should have noted that an Israeli court in 2014 upheld a lower-court finding that she had not returned to live at the property after renovations were completed in 2000 or 2001.

While the reporter tried to reach representatives of the landlord in the Sub Laban case, The Times should also have tried to reach the landlords involved in the other cases and their lawyers.



Error (Israel Hayom, AP, 4/21/15): The adjacent Western Wall, believed to be the last remnant of the Temple complex, is the holiest site where Jews can pray.

Correction (1/14/16): The adjacent Western Wall, believed to be one of the last remnants of the Temple complex, is the holiest site where Jews can pray.



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 12/16/15): The change seemed to be a result of actions taken by Israeli officials, who have focused on reducing tensions surrounding Al Aqsa, one of the holiest sites for Muslims, while instituting a series of security measures that Palestinians have denounced as collective punishment.

Correction (Online as of 12/17/15): The change seems to be a result of actions taken by Israeli officials, who have focused on reducing tensions surrounding the compound, the holiest site in Judaism and one of the holiest sites for Muslims, while instituting a series of security measures that Palestinians have denounced as collective punishment.



Error (AFP, photo caption, 10/25/15): A general view shows Jerusalem's Old City's Al-Aqsa mosque compound with the Dome of the Rock (C), Islam's holiest site, on October 25, 2015. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said that an agreement to put 24-hour security cameras around Jerusalem's sensitive Al-Aqsa mosque compound was in Israel's interest. Tensions raised over clashes at the mosque compound, known as Temple Mount to Jews, have spiraled into a wave of daily knife and shootings on Israelis as well as deadly protests. AFP PHOTO / AHMAD GHARABLI

Correction (Online as of 10/27/15): A general view shows the Dome of the Rock located at Al-Aqsa mosque compound, Islam's third holiest site, in the Old City of Jerusalem on October 25, 2015. The Al-Aqsa mosque compound is sacred in both Islam and Judaism. The compound in its current form was built in the seventh century by Islam's second caliph, Omar, on the site of the Second Jewish Temple that was destroyed by the Romans around 70 AD. In Hebrew it is referred to as Har Habayit -- the Temple Mount. Muslims call it Al-Haram al-Sharif (the Noble Sanctuary). AFP PHOTO / AHMAD GHARABLI



Error (AFP, photo caption, 10/25/15): A general view shows Jerusalem's Old City's Al-Aqsa mosque compound with the Dome of the Rock (C), Islam's holiest site, and the Western Wall (front), Judaism's holiest site, on October 25, 2015. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said that an agreement to put 24-hour security cameras around Jerusalem's sensitive Al-Aqsa mosque compound was in Israel's interest. Tensions raised over clashes at the mosque compound, known as Temple Mount to Jews, have spiraled into a wave of daily knife attacks and shootings on Israelis as well as deadly protests. AFP PHOTO/AHMAD GHARABLI

Correction (As of 10/27/15): A general view shows the Western Wall (front R), the most holy site where Jews can pray, and the Al-Aqsa mosque compound, Islam's third holiest site, which includes the Dome of the Rock mosque (C), in Jerusalem's Old City, on October 25, 2015. The Al-Aqsa mosque compound is sacred in both Islam and Judaism. The compound in its current form was built in the seventh century by Islam's second caliph, Omar, on the site of the Second Jewish Temple that was destroyed by the Romans around 70 AD. In Hebrew, it is referred to as Har Habayit -- the Temple Mount. Muslims call it Al-Haram al-Sharif (the Noble Sanctuary). AFP PHOTO / AHMAD GHARABLI



Error (New York Times, photo caption, 10/21/15): An Israeli man prays at the Western Wall, the holiest site in Judaism, on Oct. 8 in the Old City of Jerusalem.

Correction (10/21/15): An Israeli man prayed at the Western Wall, one of the holiest sites in Judaism.

 
An earlier version of this article referred incorrectly to the Western Wall. It is one of the holiest sites in Judaism, not the holiest site. (The holiest is the Temple Mount.) The error was repeated in a picture caption.



Error (New York Times, Somini Sengupta, 10/20/15): Senior United Nations officials have objected to a proposal by some Arab states to classify the Western Wall, the holiest site in Judaism . . .

Correction (10/21/15): Senior United Nations officials have objected to a proposal by some Arab states to classify the Western Wall, one of the holiest sites in Judaism . . .

 
An earlier version of this article referred incorrectly to the Western Wall. It is one of the holiest sites in Judaism, not the holiest site. (The holiest is the Temple Mount.) The error was repeated in a picture caption.



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 9/15/15): In East Jerusalem, Ms. Samri, the police spokeswoman, said protesters had thrown rocks at officers who had entered the contested holy site of the Al Aqsa Mosque -- revered by Jews as the Temple Mount and known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary, one of the three holiest sites in Islam . . .

Correction (9/16/15): In East Jerusalem, Ms. Samri, the police spokeswoman, said protesters had thrown rocks at officers who had entered the holy site — revered by Jews as the Temple Mount and known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary, one of the three holiest sites in Islam and the holiest site in Judaism . . .



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 9/15/15): In East Jerusalem, Ms. Samri, the police spokeswoman, said protesters had thrown rocks at officers who had entered the contested holy site of the Al Aqsa Mosque . . . .

Correction (9/16/15): In East Jerusalem, Ms. Samri, the police spokeswoman, said protesters had thrown rocks at officers who had entered the holy site . . .

 
An earlier version of this article misstated the officers’ actions during the clashes. They fought with protesters on the perimeter of Al Aqsa Mosque, but did not enter it. The article also referred imprecisely to the area that Muslim women were barred from entering during the early morning. It is the entire compound, not Al Aqsa Mosque itself.



Error (New York Times, headline, 9/15/15): Jewish Man Dies as Rocks Pelt His Car in West Bank

Correction (9/16/15): Jewish Man Dies as Rocks Pelt His Car in East Jerusalem . . . .

 
An earlier version of this article's headline misstated where the rock-throwing attack took place. As the article correctly reported, it was in East Jerusalem, not in the West Bank.



Error (Newsweek, headline, 9/15/15): Israeli forces storm Jerusalem's Al-Aqsa Mosque

Correction (9/16/15): Israeli Forces Storm Jerusalem's Al-Aqsa Mosque Compound

 
This article's headline originally incorrectly stated that Israeli forces had stormed Al-Aqsa Mosque. The forces stormed the compound around the mosque, not the mosque itself.



Error (Jerusalem Post, Ramy Aziz, Op-Ed, 8/26/15): Other than Saudi Arabia and Egypt, there is no one more aware of the coming danger and more capable of meeting the challenge than Tel Aviv.

Correction (9/2/15 (print edition only)): Unlike what might have been inferred in "Iran's old-new role in the region" (Comment & Features, August 27), Israel's capital is, of course, Jerusalem.



Error (Haaretz, AP, 4/21/15): The adjacent Western Wall, believed to be the last remnant of the Temple complex, is the holiest site where Jews can pray.

Correction (4/22/15): The adjacent Western Wall, believed to be one of the last remnants of the Temple complex, is the holiest site where Jews can pray. . . .

 
The Associated Press published an amended version of this article on April 21. The changes have been included in this version.



Error (Associated Press, Daniel Estrin, 4/21/15): The adjacent Western Wall, believed to be the last remnant of the Temple complex, is the holiest site where Jews can pray.

Correction (4/21/15): The adjacent Western Wall, believed to be one of the last remnants of the Temple complex, is the holiest site where Jews can pray.



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 3/16/15): Unlike Arabs in the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem, Palestinian citizens of Israel have full voting rights.

Correction (3/18/15): An article on Monday about a political awakening of Arabs in Israel this election year referred incorrectly to voting rights for Arabs in East Jerusalem. A small number — those who hold Israeli citizenship — are entitled to vote in Israeli elections; it is not the case that no Arabs in East Jerusalem can vote.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Op-Ed, Kenneth Roth, 1/15/15): In Washington, Ottawa, Paris and London, as well as in Tel Aviv, the response has ranged from discouraging to condemnatory.

Correction (1/22/15): Israel: A Jan. 15 OpEd about the Palestinians' move to join the International Criminal Court implied that Tel Aviv is the seat of the Israeli government. The government is based in Jerusalem.



Error (Times of Israel, Photo caption, 11/26/14): Palestinian supporters of the Islamic Jihad movement take part in an anti-Israel protest against the recent visits by Jewish activists to al-Aqsa mosque, in Khan Younis, southern Gaza Strip, November 7, 2014 [photo credit: Abed Rahim Khatib/Flash 90]

Correction (11/26/14): Palestinian supporters of Islamic Jihad take part in an anti-Israel protest against the recent visits by Jewish activists to the Temple Mount compound, in Khan Younis, southern Gaza Strip, November 7, 2014



Error (Wall Street Journal, headline, Oct. 28, 2014): Israel Says It Plans to Build New Jerusalem Settlements

Correction (11/18/14): Israel announced plans in late October to build 1,000 new housing units in Jerusalem. A headline on an Oct. 28 World News article about the project incorrectly said Israel plans to build new settlements.



Error (Haaretz, 10/19/14): Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas said his administration would take legal action "at the international level" to stop Jewish settlers from attacking the Al-Aqsa mosque compound, which Jews refer to as the Temple Mount.

Correction (Online as of 10/26/014): Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas said his administration would take legal action "at the international level" to stop what he called attacks by Jewish settlers at the Al-Aqsa mosque compound, which Jews refer to as the Temple Mount.



Error (Haaretz, headline, 10/19/14): Abbas threatens legal action to stop settlers from attacking Al-Aqsa

Correction (Online as of 10/26/14): Abbas threatens legal action to 'stop settlers from attacking Al-Aqsa'



Error (International New York Times, photo caption, ): Thousands thronged Friday to Shuafat, the East Jerusalem neighborhood where Muhammad Abu Khdeir, 16, was abducted. The Israeli police braced for violence that did not materialize.

Correction (7/9/14): A caption accompanying an article about the funeral for a Palestinian teenager in the Saturday-Sunday issue incorrectly stated that "the Israeli police braced for violence that did not materialize" on Friday. Clashes between Palestinians and the Israeli police were reported on that day.



Error (AP, 5/28/14): Israeli police say masked protesters hurled stones at policemen standing at the gates of the a sensitive Jerusalem holy site, prompting security forces to enter the compound and disperse the demonstrators.

Correction (5/28/14): Masked Palestinian protesters hurled stones at policemen manning the gates of a sensitive Jerusalem holy site on Wednesday, prompting security forces to enter the compound and disperse the demonstrators, Israeli police said.



Error (Haaretz, Op-Ed, Nicolas Pelham, 5/12/14): The Knesset bans Christmas trees, which sprout all over Palestine, from its premises.

Correction (Online as of 5/12/14, not in print): The Knesset bans Christmas trees which sprout all over Palestine from public display on its premises.



Error (Monitor Global Outlook, Elizabeth Dickinson, 4/14/2014): Meanwhile, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas petitioned to sign 15 international treaties -- a move for more global recognition that Tel Aviv has viewed as a provocation.

Correction (Online as of 4/30/14): The original version of this article incorrectly implied that Tel Aviv is the seat of the Israeli government. The Israel government is based in Jerusalem.



Error (Haaretz, Judy Maltz, 4/23/14): For the past quarter of a century, Tanya's mother has been at the forefront of the battle to grant women the right to pray as they see fit at the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site.

Correction: For the past quarter of a century, Tanya’s mother has been at the forefront of the battle to grant women the right to pray as they see fit at the Western Wall, one of Judaism’s holiest sites.



Error (Haaretz, Judy Maltz, 4/8/14): It was Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu who tapped Sharansky for the job, under pressure from world Jewish leaders upset by the scenes of women in prayer shawls being detained by police at Judaism’s holiest site.

Correction (Online as of 4/8/14): It was Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu who tapped Sharansky for the job, under pressure from world Jewish leaders upset by the scenes of women in prayer shawls being detained by police at one of Judaism’s holiest sites.



Error (Haaretz, subheadline, 4/8/14): A look at 10 key players in the dramatic, but ultimately abortive, plan to integrate women's prayer into Judaism's holiest site.

Correction (Online as of 4/8/14): A look at 10 key players in the dramatic, but ultimately abortive, plan to integrate women's prayer into one of Judaism's holiest sites.



Error (Washington Post, Ruth Eglash, 3/20/14): . . . .Wednesday's airstrikes raised tensions directly between Tel Aviv and Damascus.

Correction (3/22/14): A March 20 A-section article about Israeli airstrikes on Syrian army positions in the Golan Heights incorrectly implied that Tel Aviv is the seat of the Israeli government. The Israeli government is based in Jerusalem.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 2/11/14): Israel opened its first industrial zone in occupied Palestinian territory shortly after the 1967 war, in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Atarot.

Correction (2/20/14): An article on Feb. 11 about a debate over whether Israeli companies operating in West Bank settlements do more to help or hurt the Palestinians they employ referred imprecisely to the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Atarot, where Israel opened an industrial zone after the 1967 war. While the Palestinians and most of the world consider it to be occupied Palestinian territory, Atarot was a Jewish village until 1948, and Israel considers all of Jerusalem to be its capital.

Fact: It is unclear on what basis the newspaper reached the conclusion that "most of the world" sees Atarot as Palestinian territory.



Error (New York Times, Ali Jarbawi, Op-Ed, 1/22/14): In 2000, [Ariel Sharon] entered Al Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem, a holy Muslim site, which triggered the second intifada.

Correction (1/28/14): Because of an editing error, an opinion article on Wednesday incorrectly described a 2000 visit by Ariel Sharon to the contested religious site known as the Temple Mount. He toured the complex, which includes the Al Aqsa Mosque, but did not enter the mosque itself.



Error (International New York Times, Mark Landler and Jodi Rudoren, 11/6/13): An absence of progress on the core issues, an ill-timed Israeli plan to build 3,500 more settlements on the West Bank and East Jerusalem. . .

Correction (11/7/13): An article on Wednesday about American efforts to reinvigorate the Middle East peace negotiations stated incorrectly that Israel plans to build 3,500 additional settlements on the West Bank and in East Jerusalem. Israel does not plan more settlements, but it has recently advanced projects for that number of new housing units within existing settlements.



Error (Telegraph, Dina Rickman, 10/23/13): The Western Wall might be the holiest site in the Jewish world, but not all Jews can worship there as they wish…

Correction (10/24/13): The Western Wall might be the holiest site in the Jewish world where Jews are permitted to pray, but not all Jews can worship there as they wish…



Error (Guardian, photo caption, 9/21/13): Palestinian men shout and chant anti-Israel slogans after scores of Jewish settlers, backed by Israeli security forces, stormed the compound of al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem for Yom Kippur on 13 September

Correction (Online as of 9/25/13): Palestinian men shout anti-Israel slogans during a protest in Gaza on 13 September after restrictions were imposed on Muslims attending Friday prayers at Jerusalem's Al-Aqsa compound.

Error (CNN.com, Jason Hanna, Joe Sterling and Michael Martinez, 7/21/13): It annexed East Jerusalem from the Palestinian territories, uniting the historic city to make it the capital of the Jewish state.

Correction (Posted online as of 8/1/13): An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated who controlled East Jerusalem in the years immediately prior to the Arab-Israeli Six-Day War. East Jerusalem was under Jordan's control when it was taken over by Israel in the 1967 war.



Error (Ha'aretz6/30/13): Canceling a scheduled trip to Abu Dhabi, Kerry flew from Jerusalem to Amman for another meeting with Abbas, followed by a third meeting, in Tel Aviv, with Netanyahu.

Correction (7/1/13): Due to an editing error, an article published on June 30 ("Kerry's shuttle diplomacy yet to yield solid results") reported that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu met with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Tel Aviv. All three of their meetings took place in Jerusalem.



Error (Ha'aretz, Yair Ettinger, 5/10/13): Just Tuesday, the Temple Mount was the site of violent riots, when 200 Jews were permitted to enter the holy site to pray in honor of Jerusalem Day.

Correction (5/16/13): Due to a translation error, two recent articles ("Jordan grills Israeli ambassador following Temple Mount rioting," May 9, and "Women of Wall, Haredi girls to face off at Kotel," May 10) incorrectly stated that police allowed worshippers to enter the Temple Mount to pray. By Israeli law, Jews are not permitted to pray on the Temple Mount.



Error (Ha'aretz, Barak Ravid, 5/9/13): The rioting ensued Tuesday after the police allowed some 200 Jews to enter the Temple Mount to pray in honor of Jerusalem Day.

Correction (5/16/13): Due to a translation error, two recent articles ("Jordan grills Israeli ambassador following Temple Mount rioting," May 9, and "Women of Wall, Haredi girls to face off at Kotel," May 10) incorrectly stated that police allowed Jewish worshippers to enter the Temple Mount to pray. By Israeli law, Jews are not permitted to pray on the Temple Mount.



Error (Guardian, Hanan Ashrawi, Op-Ed, 11/29/12): Take a recent decision by Israel to approve 100 new homes for its Jewish citizens in the illegal settlement of Gilo, when the Israeli army was bombarding and shelling Gaza.

Correction (12/21/12): This article was amended on 21 December 2012. The original referred to a "recent decision by Israel to approve 100 new homes for its Jewish citizens in the illegal settlement of Gilo". This has been corrected. While it is highly unlikely that they will be occupied by anyone other than Jewish citizens because of the social and political context, the homes will not be sold on the basis of ethnicity.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Ruderon and Mark Landler, 12/1/12): Construction in E1, in West Bank territory that Israel captured in the 1967 war, would connect the large Jewish settlement of Maale Adumim to Jerusalem, dividing the West Bank in two. The Palestinian cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem would be cut off from the capital, making the contiguous Palestinian state endorsed by the United Nations last week virtually impossible.

Correction (12/8/12): Because of an editing error, an article last Saturday about Israel’s decision to move forward with planning and zoning for settlements in an area east of Jerusalem known as E1 described imprecisely the effect of such development on access to the cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem from Jerusalem. While development of E1 would limit access to Ramallah and Bethlehem to narrow corridors far from the Old City and downtown Jerusalem, it would not completely separate those cities from Jerusalem.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Ruderon, 12/2/12): Construction in E1, in West Bank territory that Israel captured in the 1967 war, would connect the large Jewish settlement of Maale Adumim to Jerusalem, dividing the West Bank in two. The Palestinian cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem would be cut off from the capital, making the contiguous Palestinian state endorsed by the United Nations last week virtually impossible. . . Like E1, [construction in Givat Hamatos] too would be a roadblock to plans for a contiguous Palestinian state . .

Correction (12/16/12 (in print); 12/10/12 (online)): An article on Dec. 2 about Israel’s decision to move forward with planning and zoning for settlements in an area east of Jerusalem known as E1 described imprecisely the effect of such development on access to the cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem from Jerusalem, and on the West Bank. Development of E1 would limit access to Ramallah and Bethlehem, leaving narrow corridors far from the Old City and downtown Jerusalem; it would not completely cut off those cities from Jerusalem. It would also create a large block of Israeli settlements in the center of the West Bank; it would not divide the West Bank in two. And because of an editing error, the article referred incompletely to the possibility of a contiguous Palestinian state. Critics see E1 as a threat to the meaningful contiguity of such a state because it would leave some Palestinian areas connected by roads with few exits or by circuitous routes; the proposed development would not technically make a contiguous Palestinian state impossible.



Error (CNN.com, 11/6/12): Israel captured Jerusalem and the West Bank during the Six Day War in 1967.

Correction (Online as of 11/11/12): Israel captured East Jerusalem and the West Bank during the Six Day War in 1967.



Error (Washington Post, Scott Wilson, 3/21/12): Obama's more aggressive message this year reflects the increasing concern in Washington, Tel Aviv and other capitals about Iran's enrichment program, which Israel believes will be used to produce a nuclear weapon.



Correction (3/30/12): A March 21 A-section article about President Obama's annual message to the Iranian people incorrectly referred to Tel Aviv as the capital of Israel. Israel designated Jerusalem as its capital in 1950, although many countries maintain embassies and other diplomatic missions in Tel Aviv because of the Palestinians' competing claim on Jerusalem as their capital.



Error (Ha'aretz, Zvi Bar'el, Op-Ed, 1/16/11): Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat proposed a reasonable real estate swap: Beit Yonatan would not be evacuated or sealed, and in exchange, the municipality would delay the evacuation of the Abu Na'eb home where Palestinians live. A house in which Jews live illegally will be exchanged for a house in which Palestinians live entirely legally.

Correction (1/17/11): Due to a translation error, Zvi Bar'el's op-ed ("From Beit Bialik to Beit Yonatan," Haaretz, January 16), contained an inaccurate reference to Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat's proposed solution to the Beit Yonatan issue. The sentence in question should have read: "A house in which Jews live illegally will be exchanged for a house in which Palestinians live illegally."



Error (Washington Post, Janine Zacharia, 12/4/10): Jerusalem rabbis this week held a special prayer for rain at Judaism's holiest site, the Western Wall.

Correction (12/29/10): A Dec. 4 A-section article about a wildfire in Israel incorrectly described the Western Wall, where a prayer for rain was held, as Judaism's holiest site. The wall is the holiest place Jews can pray, but the Temple Mount is considered Judaism's holiest site.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Duke Helfand, 5/11/09): Benedict's Middle East pilgrimage began in Jordan and will also take him to the West Bank, where he'll visit the Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial and Jerusalem's Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site.

Correction (5/14/09): Pope Benedict XVI: The Beliefs column in Monday's Section A about the pope's visit to Israel and the West Bank suggested that the Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial and the Western Wall are on [sic] the West Bank. Yad Vashem is in west Jerusalem; the Western Wall is in the contested Old City of Jerusalem.



Error (BBC Web site, 7/25/08): The Western, or Wailing, Wall, is the holiest place in Judaism.

Correction (12/18/08): The Western, or Wailing, Wall, is one of the holiest places in Judaism.

Update 18 December 2008: This story originally referred to the Wailing Wall as the holiest place in Judaism. This reference has been amended.



Error (Daily News, 7/24/08): Barack Obama paid a surprise visit today to Jerusalem's Western Wall, the holiest site in Judaism

Correction (Online update, 8/19/08): Note: The story incorrectly referred to the Western Wall as the holiest site in Judaism. It is one of the holiest sites, but the Temple Mount is regarded as the most holy site.



Error (Star-Ledger, Claire Heininger, 7/21/08): Near the Western Wall, the holiest site in Judaism, the governor was mobbed by a student tour group from Rutgers.

Correction (8/5/08): A story on July 21 about Gov. Jon Corzine's trip to Israel mischaracterized the religious importance of the Western Wall in Jerusalem. The wall is the holiest place Jews can pray. The holiest site in Judaism is the Temple Mount.



Error (International Herald Tribune, Isabel Kershner, 7/29/08): Israel took Jerusalem in the 1967 war and then annexed it.

Correction (8/2-3/08): Because of an editing error, an article Tuesday about tensions between Hamas and Fatah misstated the history of Jerusalem. Israel conquered only the eastern part of the city in the 1967 war, not all of it, and later annexed that part.



Error (Washington Post, photo caption, 3/20/08): As Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman (I-Conn.) watches, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) lays his hand on the ancient stones of the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site.

Correction (3/27/08): A photo caption with a March 20 A-section article mischaracterized the religious importance of the Western Wall in Jerusalem. The wall is the holiest place Jews can pray, not Judaism's holiest place.

Fact: The Temple Mount is Judaism's holiest site.



Error (Ynetnew.com, Yossi Beilin Op-Ed, 10/15/07): All of the 250,000 Palestinians residing in Jerusalem continue to remain Israeli citizens (albeit without the right to vote in Israel's Knesset and without an Israeli passport, but with full social benefits such as health and education.) 

Correction (Online as of 10/25/07): All 250,000 Palestinians in Jerusalem are entitled to Israeli citizenship, but if they decline, they are automatically considered permanent residents (albeit without the right to vote in Israel's Knesset and without an Israeli passport, but with full social benefits such as health and education).

Fact: Israeli citizenship grants Jerusalem Arabs a vote in national elections and an Israeli passport.



Error (Chicago Tribune, from Los Angeles Times, 7/26/08): ...the rabbi who manages Judaism's holiest site [the Western Wall], was furious.

Correction (7/30/08): A story in Saturday's Section 1 incorrectly referred to Jerusalem's Western Wall as "Judaism's holiest site." It is Judaism's holiest shrine.

Fact: While the Western Wall is the holiest man-made structure at which Jews are permitted to pray, the holiest ground in Judaism is on the Temple Mount.



Error (AP, Sarah El Deeb, 6/5/07): The [Palestinian conference] was banned since it was backed by the Palestinian Authority, which Israeli law prohibits from operating in east Jerusalem, police spokesman Shmuel Ben-Ruby said.

Correction (6/5/07, updated article): The gathering was banned since it was backed by the Palestinian Authority, police spokesman Shmuel Ben-Ruby. The authority is barred from operating in east Jerusalem, which Israel annexed in 1967 soon after capturing it.

Fact: Bilateral peace accords prohibit Palestinian Authority activity in Jerusalem. The Declaration of Principles and the Interim Agreement stipulate that the Palestinian Council shall have no authority in Jerusalem during the interim period. Moreover, the Note for the Record attached to the Hebron Protocol restated that all Palestinian Council offices and activity remain in areas under Palestinian jurisdiction -- in other words, outside of Jerusalem.



Error (Boston Globe, photo caption, 2/13/07): An Orthodox Jewish man looked at the excavation site in front of the Dome of the Rock (top) at the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem's Old City yesterday. Hoping to quell Muslim protests, Jerusalem's mayor yesterday order a review of construction outside the holy site at issue in the Arab-Israeli conflict, a spokesman said. Preparatory excavations began last week and have infuriated people across the Muslim world who want the shrine protected.

Correction (2/15/07): Clarification: A photo caption in Tuesday's World pages showing excavation outside the Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem may have left the impression, based on concerns raised by Muslims, that the construction imperils the mosque. Israel says the mosque, which is 400 feet from the work, is in no danger.



Error (AP, Matti Friedman, 2/8/07): Two mosques, the Al-Aqsa and Dome of the Rock, now stand on the site, along with some of the temples' original retaining walls, including the Jewish shrine called the Western Wall

Correction (2/8/07, updated story): The compound is home to the Al Aqsa mosque and the golden-capped Dome of the Rock shrine, as well as to the original retaining walls of the second Jewish temple, including the Jewish shrine called the Western Wall.



Fact: There is one mosque on the Temple Mount, not two.

Error (AP, 9/28/05): The uprising followed a Sept. 28, 2000 visit by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, then in opposition, to the al Aqsa Mosque, one of Islamís most sacred sites in Jerusalemís Old City.

Correction (Updated story, 9/28/05): The uprising followed a Sept. 28, 2000 visit by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, then in opposition, to the Aqsa Mosque compound, one of the holiest sites in Islam. The compound also is sacred to Jews as the site of the ancient Jewish temples.



Error (AFP, 6/28/05): OIC was given its current name when it was first established at a meeting of Islamic leaders convened in Morocco following an attempt by Jewish hardliners to burn down Islam's third holiest site -- Jerusalem's Al-Aqsa mosque -- which is also revered in Judaism.

Correction (7/6/05): ATTENTION - CORRECTION: In OIC-Yemen,sched-lead moved on June 28, 10th para should read xxx following an attempt by an Australian member of the Protestant Church of God, Dennis Michael Rohan, to burn down Islam's third-holiest site XXX /// A corrected version of story follows.



Error (AFP, 6/10/05): The compound which houses Al-Aqsa, the third holiest site in Judaism, also contains the Western Wall, the most sacred site in Judaism.

Correction (Updated story, 6/10/05): The compound which houses Al-Aqsa, the third holiest site in Islam, also contains the Western Wall, the most sacred site in Judaism.

Fact: Left uncorrected is the false statement that the Western Wall is the most sacred site in Judaism. The Temple Mount is the most sacred site.

Error (Los Angeles Times, on-line photo essay, 12/27/04): With children at his side, an Orthodox Jew prays at the Western Wall, Judaismís most holy site, in Jerusalemís Old City. This section of retainer wall is all thatís left of the Second Temple, which was destroyed by Romans in 70 AD.

Correction (Posted as of 1/10/05): With children at his side, an Orthodox Jews prays at the Western Wall, Judaismís most holy site where Jewish prayer is permitted.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Laura King, 9/20/04): Madonna tried to make a predawn pilgrimage Sunday to the Western Wall in Jerusalemís Old City, which is held to be the sole remnant of the Jewsí Second Temple.

Correction (9/24/04): Western Wall–An article in Mondayís Section A about a visit to Jerusalem by pop star Madonna described the Western Wall in the Old City as the sole remnant of Jewsí Second Temple. It is the principal remnant of the temple complex accessible to worshipers, but other archeological elements survive.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Times Wire Services, 10/12/03): That [Camp David] plan outlined a proposal for a Palestinian state in the Gaza Strip and about 95% of the West Bank as well as parts of East Jerusalem, including limited sovereignty over a Muslim shrine that abuts the Western Wall, Judaismís holiest site.

Correction (11/14/03): Holy site–An Oct. 12 wire report in Section A about Israeli-Palestinian violence incorrectly indicated Judaismís holiest site. It is the Temple Mount, not the Western Wall.



Error (Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY), graphic, 5/27/03): Capital: Tel Aviv. 355,900. (Note: Israel claims Jerusalem as its capital, but most countries maintain embassies in Tel Aviv.)

Correction (5/27/03): Jerusalem is the capital of Israel. Most nations, including the United States, have their embassies in Tel Aviv. Information on Page 17A Sunday was incorrect.



Error (New York Times, John Kifner, 5/29/02): This afternoon the army was digging a huge ditch enclosed by barbed wire coils piled high to form a barrier between Bethlehem and Gilo, a nearby East Jerusalem neighborhood, where a sprawling Jewish area has been built on land seized after the war of 1967.

Correction (6/5/02): An article last Wednesday about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict misstated the location of Gilo, a Jewish neighborhood built on land captured by Israel in the 1967 Middle East war. It is in southern Jerusalem, not East Jerusalem.



Error (New York Times, Deborah Sontag, 3/28/01): Miki Levy, the Jerusalem police chief, said that a suicide bomber wearing an explosive belt had blown himself up while standing beside a bus headed for the settlement of Pisgat Zeev.

Correction (4/2/01): An article on March 28 about pressure on Prime Minister Ariel Sharon to retaliate against Palestinians for attacks on Israelis referred imprecisely to Pisgat Zeev, a Jewish neighborhood built in 1984, which was the destination of a bus attacked by a Palestinian suicide bomber. While the Palestinians consider it a settlement, the Israelis say it is part of municipal Jerusalem.



Error (New York Times, Susan Sachs, 11/13/00): Jerusalem, once controlled by Jordan and conquered by Israel in 1967, contains sites that Jews, Muslims and Christians consider holy and is at the heart of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

Correction (11/15/00): An article on Monday about a meeting of Muslim countries in Qatar at which Israel was denounced misstated the extent of Jordanís control of Jerusalem before the 1967 Middle East war. Jordan controlled only East Jerusalem and the Old City; Israel controlled the rest of Jerusalem.



Error (Wall Street Journal, 11/13/00): Anger against Israel has long been the touchstone of both Arabic and Islamic unity – as has Jerusalemís al-Aqsa mosque, a sacred Islamic site on what Jews call Temple Mount. It was an Israeliís attempt to burn down al-Aqsa in 1969 that led to the founding of the OIC [Organization of the Islamic Conference].

Correction (11/15/00): The arsonist who attempted to burn down Jerusalemís al-Aqsa mosque in 1969 was an Australian who belonged to a Christian fundamentalist sect. An article in Mondayís edition on talks between U.S., Israeli and Palestinians leaders incorrectly stated that an Israeli had made the attempt.



Error (Boston Globe, Charles Sennott, 10/18/00): The couple, like many of the 40,000 in Gilo, live there probably less for the ideological commitment to settling the land for Jews and more for the government subsidies and affordable housing that come with living in a settlement.

Correction (10/20/00): Because of a reporting error, a story in Wednesdayís A section about violence on the outskirts of Jerusalem indicated that the residential area of Jerusalem known as Gilo received government subsidies that are provided to Jewish settlements. Israeli officials say the funding provided in Gilo is the same as the funding given to areas within the municipality of Jerusalem and does not come from budgets provided for Jewish settlements in the West Bank and Gaza.