Sunday, February 25, 2018
  Home
RSS Feed
Facebook
Twitter
Search:
Media Analyses
Journalists
Middle East Issues
Christian Issues
Names In The News
CAMERA Authors
Headlines & Photos
Errors & Corrections
 Corrected
 Uncorrected
 Dismal Corrections
Film Reviews
CAMERA Publications
Film Suggestions
Be An Activist
Adopt A Library
History of CAMERA
About CAMERA
Join/Contribute
Contact CAMERA
Contact The Media
Privacy Policy
 
Corrected

West Bank

Error (National Geographic, Simon Worrall's 'Book Talk' interview with Nicholas Blincoe, 12/23/17): For ten years [from 2002] there were no tourists [in Bethlehem!]

Correction (12/25/17):

For ten years after the second intifada, in 2001, tourism to Bethlehem struggled, although today the number of visitors has increased again. …
 
Clarification: This interview has been updated to more accurately reflect the source of some of Jerusalem’s water, and levels of tourism in Bethlehem in the years following 2001.



Error (Newsweek, Carlos Ballesteros, 11/30/17): Susiya has been in Palestinian control since the 1830s. The village is located on private Palestinian land in the West Bank. According to the letter, "34 families — including 85 children — call Susiya their home and survive through subsistence farming and shepherding."

Correction (12/10/17): The village of Susiya is located in the occupied West Bank. According to the letter, "45 families — including 85 children — call Susiya their home and survive through subsistence farming and shepherding." Claims over Susiya are a microcosm of the larger territorial disputes between Israel and the Palestinians. The Israeli government has claimed control of the land since 1967, saying that the village's structures were built without official permits, thus giving the government permission to demolish what it sees as illegal settlements. Pro-Palestinian supporters in Israel and abroad claim Palestinians have farmed and grazed the land for centuries. …

 
This article originally stated that Palestinians have controlled Susiya since the 1830s. It has been updated to reflect the long dispute between Israelis and Palestinians over control of Susiya, in which both sides have made opposing claims of control.



Error (AP, 10/26/17): Palestinians in the West Bank do not have citizenship or the right to vote.

[…]

The BDS movement advocates boycotts, divestment and sanctions against Israel in what supporters say is a nonviolent way to promote the Palestinian struggle for independence. Erdan says most of its activists aim to delegitimize and destroy Israel …



Correction (Updated story, 10/26/17): …Palestinians living in the West Bank, which Israel captured in the 1967 Middle East war, do not have Israeli citizenship or the right to vote in Israeli elections.

[...]

The boycott movement, also called the BDS movement, advocates boycotts, divestment and sanctions against Israel in what supporters say is a nonviolent way to promote the Palestinian cause. …

Israel says the campaign, with its call for a return of Palestinian refugees to lost land inside what is now Israel, goes beyond the West Bank occupation and masks a deeper aim of destroying the entire country.



Error (National Geographic, Christine Blau, 9/8/17): Palestine offers plenty of more enjoyable things to visit, like the exceptional stepped landscape of Battir covered in olive trees and grape vines, the renowned food scene of Nablus, or the winding alleyways of the oldest town in history, Jericho.

Correction (9/13/17): Some tourists intend to visit the wall, while others just pass by on the way to more enjoyable places to visit, like the exceptional stepped landscape of Battir covered in olive trees and grape vines, the renowned food scene of Nablus, or the winding alleyways of the oldest town in history, Jericho.



Error (New York Times, Journey, Seventy Years to the State of Israel): On this nine-day itinerary, travel with experts from The New York Times, a leader in its evenhanded coverage of Israel, Palestine and the Middle East.

Correction (8/7/17): On this nine-day itinerary, travel with experts from The New York Times, a leader in its evenhanded coverage of Israel, Palestinians and the Middle East.



Error (National Geographic, Kristin Romey, 7/27/17): According to the results, Canaanite ancestry is a mix of indigenous populations who settled the Levant (the region encompassing much of modern Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Palestine) …

Correction (7/28/17): According to the results, Canaanite ancestry is a mix of indigenous populations who settled the Levant (the region encompassing much of modern Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinian territories) …

 
This article has been amended to reflect our correct style usage for the Palestinian territories.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Randy Lewis, 6/22/17): Waters regularly targets corporate greed, political chicanery, eroding civil liberties, warmongering and other hot-button topics, and he doesn’t shy from taking a stand, even when it has put his career on the line, as has been the case with his support of Palestinian rights in ongoing tensions between Israel and Palestine.

Correction (6/28/17): Roger Waters: An article in the June 22 Calendar section about Roger Waters' new album said Waters supports Palestinians' rights but incorrectly referred to tensions between Israel and Palestine. It should have said tensions between the Israeli government and the Palestinians.



Error (National Geographic, Melody Rowell, 12/8/16): A few years ago, Balilty was on assignment in Yeruham, Israel, photographing a factory that produced concrete bricks for the barrier between Israel and Palestine.

Correction (12/15/16): A previous version of this article incorrectly referred to a barrier between Israel and Palestine. The barrier is between Israel and the West Bank.



Error (Gazette (Montreal), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (National Post (Canada), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Ottawa Citizen, AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (London Free Press (Ontario), AP, 11/17/23): Avigdor Lieberman comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Leader-Post (Regina), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Windsor Star (Ontario), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Calgary Herald, AP, 11/17/16): The comments by Avigdor Lieberman, pictured, came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Star-Phoenix (Saskatoon), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.



Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (New York Times online, AP, 11/16/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/21/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate," ''corrosive to the cause of peace" and "raise serious questions about Israel's ultimate commitment to a peaceful negotiated settlement with the Palestinians." Most of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Edmonton Journal, AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. views as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlements policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlements construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Los Angeles Times online, AP, 11/16/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/21/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate," ''corrosive to the cause of peace" and "raise serious questions about Israel's ultimate commitment to a peaceful negotiated settlement with the Palestinians." Most of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Vancouver Sun, AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.

Error (ABC News online, AP, 11/16/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/21/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate," ''corrosive to the cause of peace" and "raise serious questions about Israel's ultimate commitment to a peaceful negotiated settlement with the Palestinians." Most of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (AP, Tia Goldenberg, 11/16/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/21/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate," "corrosive to the cause of peace" and "raise serious questions about Israel's ultimate commitment to a peaceful negotiated settlement with the Palestinians." Most of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Haaretz, 10/31/16): Palestinian intelligence sources said that they were investigating whether Turkamen may have carried out the attack as revenge after security agents searched his house on Monday, suspecting he may be concealing weapons and ammunitions that he did not need for his police work.

Correction (11/1/16): Palestinian intelligence sources said they were investigating whether Turkamen may have carried out the attack as revenge after Palestinian security agents searched his house on Monday, suspecting he may be concealing weapons and ammunition that he did not need for his police work.



Error (Reuters, photo captions, 3/31/16): [Ihab] Maswadeh was shot dead by Israeli troops after he attempted to stab an Israeli soldier last December.

Correction (4/4/16):

REFILE - CLARIFYING REFERENCE TO THE STABBING ATTACK A relative of Palestinian Ihab Maswadeh (seen in the poster), who fatally stabbed an Israeli man last December, inspects the damage after the Israeli forces partially demolished Maswadeh's house in the West Bank city of Hebron March 31, 2016.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Kate Shuttleworth, 4/1/16): When video emerged last week of an Israeli soldier apparently shooting a wounded Palestinian protester in the head, killing him instantly, the condemnation was almost instantaneous — from within and without Israel.

Correction (4/2/16): Israeli soldier: An article in the April 1 Section A described a Palestinian who was killed by an Israeli soldier as a protester. He should have been described as an assailant.



Error (Voice of America, headline, 3/14/16): Three Palestinians killed in West Bank attacks

Correction (3/15/16): Israel Military Kills Three West Bank Attackers



Error (New York Times, Rick Gladstone, 1/13/16): It appeared to be the first time that a pension fund of a large American church had taken such a step regarding the Israeli banks, which help finance settlement construction in what most of the world considers illegally occupied Palestinian territories.

Correction (Online as of 3/17/16): It appeared to be the first time that a pension fund of a large American church had taken such a step regarding the Israeli banks, which help finance settlement construction in occupied Palestinian territories. Most of the world considers those settlements illegal …

 
An earlier version of this article referred incorrectly to the Palestinian territories. While most of the world officially considers the territories occupied, and the Israeli settlements in them illegal, there is no consensus that the occupation is illegal.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 10/3/15): The United Nations Security Council condemned Israel's annexation of Golan, and most of the world officially considers the territory illegally occupied, just like the West Bank.

Correction (10/14/15): The United Nations Security Council condemned Israel's annexation of Golan, and most of the world officially considers the territory occupied and the settlements there illegal, just like the West Bank …

 
An earlier version of this article referred incorrectly to the Golan Heights. While most of the world officially considers it to be occupied, and the settlements there illegal, there is no consensus that the occupation itself is illegal. The same error appeared in an earlier version of a caption with the accompanying slide show.



Error (Times of Israel, headline, 10/7/15): Settlers shoot, wound Palestinian teen in clash

Correction (10/7/15): Israelis shoot at mob assailing Jewish woman, injure Palestinian



Error (Times of Israel, headline, 10/3/15): Palestinian child said shot by Israeli driver in West Bank

Correction (10/6/15): Palestinian child shot while playing with gun



Error (Haaretz, Bradley Burston, Op-Ed, 8/17/15): Apartheid means Likud lawmaker and former Shin Bet chief Avi Dichter calling Sunday for separate, segregated roads and highways for Jews and Arabs in the West Bank.

Correction (8/23/15): Apartheid means Likud lawmaker and former Shin Bet chief Avi Dichter calling Sunday for separate, segregated roads and highways for Israelis and Palestinians in the West Bank. . . . 

This article was amended on August 23 to correct comments by Avi Dichter, who called for separate roads in the West Bank for Israelis and Palestinians, rather than Jews and Arabs, as originally reported.



Error (+972 blog, Amjad Alqasis, 6/5/15): As a report for the Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America concludes:

Israel has spent millions of dollars refurbishing Christian sites in Israel and trying to create new ones . . . The [Israeli] Tourism Ministry is also promoting a Christmas Eve alternative to Bethlehem -- which is under control of the Palestinian Authority -- by inviting pilgrims and foreign diplomats to the Israeli city of Nazereth to enjoy a Christmas market, parade and fireworks. . .
 
Palestinians [emphasize that, as a result] they are being cut out of a market they once dominated. Palestinian tourism officials say Israeli is discouraging visits to areas administered by the Palestinian Authority and is promoting attractions in other [de facto annexed] parts of the West Bank, such as the baptismal site at the Jordan River," the committee reported.


Correction (6/7/15): A previous version of this article mistakenly attributed a quote about Israel’s attempts to compete with Palestinians for Christian tourism to CAMERA — Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America. The article has been corrected to reflect that the quote was actually from a Los Angeles Times article, portions of which appeared on the CAMERA website as part of its critique of the article. The irony of misquoting an organization dedicated to “accuracy in reporting” is not lost on us.



Error (Haaretz, Jack Khoury, 3/5/15): Last year, al-Mughayyir's mosque was torched and spray-painted with racist slogans. Villagers said the arson caused major damage to the first floor and minor damage to the second floor.

Correction (3/8/15): [CAMERA notes: This paragraph was deleted from the article. No note citing the deletion of the false information was appended to the article.]



Error (Haaretz, photo caption, 3/5/15): The scorched interior of a mosque that was set on fire in November in the Palestinian village of al-Mughayyir, where another suspected hate crime was committed early Thursday morning.

Correction (3/8/15): Palestinians inspect a fire-damaged mosque in the West Bank village of Mughayer, north of Ramallah, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014.



Error (National Geographic, photo caption, 12/14): Prayers fill the air along the 42-yard length of the men's section of the Western Wall, in the prayer plaza in Jerusalem, the holiest site in Judaism.

Correction (Online as of 1/5/15): Prayers fill the air along the 42-yard length of the men's section of the Western Wall, in the prayer plaza in Jerusalem, the holiest place where Jews can pray.



Error (Haaretz, Chaim Levinson, 12/31/14): In November Palestinian reports said that settlers set fire to a mosque in the village of Moughayer. Worshippers arriving for morning prayers put out the fire.

Correction (1/1/15): In November Palestinian reports said that settlers set fire to a mosque in the village of Mughayer. Worshipers arriving for morning prayers put out the fire. Israeli firefighters subsequently determined that a fire at a mosque in early November was an electrical fire, rather than an act of arson as was previously believed.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 11/19/14): [Mahmoud Abbas] also mentioned a recent arson at a West Bank mosque (a firebomb was thrown at an old synagogue in an Arab-Israeli town on the same day.)

Correction (12/19/14): A news analysis article on Nov. 19 about tensions between Israelis and Palestinians centered on a holy site in Jerusalem known to Muslims as Al Aqsa, or the Noble Sanctuary, and to Jews as the Temple Mount referred incorrectly to a fire at a West Bank mosque that the Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, mentioned in his demand that Jews “stop incitement against Aqsa.” The cause had yet to be determined; it was not a “recent arson.” (The Israeli police have since determined that the fire was most likely caused by an electrical fault, not arson.)



Error (Captions, 11/12/14): A Palestinian shows a damaged Quran, Islam's holy book, in a mosque following an attack in the West Bank village of Mughayer, north of Ramallah, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. An attack against a mosque in a West Bank village early on Wednesday ignited a fire that destroyed its first floor, the village's mayor said, blaming Jewish settlers for the attack.

Correction (12/15/14): A Palestinian shows a Quran, Islam's holy book, damaged in a mosque fire in the West Bank village of Mughayer, north of Ramallah, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. The village's mayor accused Jewish settlers of setting the fire, which destroyed the first floor of the mosque, but Israeli investigators believe the fire was accidental.



Error (Photo caption, 12/11/14): Palestinians inspect damages of a mosque following an attack in the West Bank village of Mughayer, north of Ramallah, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014.

Correction (12/15/14): Palestinians inspect a fire-damaged mosque in the West Bank village of Mughayer, north of Ramallah, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014.



Error (Washington Post, Elaine Woo, obituary, 9/23/14): In 1958 [Gerald] Larue joined USC's faculty as a professor of biblical history and archaeology. In the 1960s he took part in digs in Egypt, Palestine and other parts of the Middle East, returning with artifacts preserved in a USC archaeological collection.

Correction (9/25/14): The Sept. 23 obituary for religious scholar Gerald A. Larue inaccurately reported that he participated in archaeological digs in Egypt, Palestine and other parts of the Middle East. He took part in digs in Egypt, Israel and the West Bank, not Palestine.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Elaine Woo, obituary, 9/22/14): In 1958 [Gerald] Larue joined USC's faculty as a professor of biblical history and archaeology. In the 1960s he took part in digs in Egypt, Palestine and other parts of the Middle East, returning with artifacts preserved in a USC archaeological collection.

Correction (9/24/14): Gerald A. Larue: In the Sept. 22 LATExtra section, the obituary of USC religious scholar Gerald A. Larue referred to archaeological digs in Palestine. The digs occurred in Israel and the West Bank.



Error (Washington Post, Ruth Eglash, 9/5/14): Israel and Jordan signed a peace agreement in November 1994, but in recent years, relations between the two countries have been strained because of Israel's continued occupation of Palestinian land in the West Bank – a swath of territory sandwiched between the two nations and its partial siege of the Gaza Strip, which borders Egypt.

Correction (9/6/14): A Sept. 5-A section article about Jordan agreeing to buy natural gas from Israel incorrectly referred to Israel's occupation of "Palestinian lands" in the West Bank. The Israeli-occupied territories are disputed lands that Palestinians want for a future Palestinian state.



Error (Huffington Post UK, headline, 7/1/14): Murdered Israeli Teens Given Joint Funeral As Aistrikes Against West Bank Continue

Correction (7/2/14): Murdered Israeli Teens Given Joint Funeral As Airstrikes Against Gaza Continue



Error (i24 News, Lily Galili, 6/30/14): They've been trying for decades to "settle in the hearts of all Israelis" and erase the distinction between those living inside the Green Line -- Israel's internationally recognized border -- and those beyond and to convey that life in the settlements is as normal as anywhere inside Israel.

Correction (6/30/14): They've been trying for decades to "settle in the hearts of all Israelis," and erase the distinction between those living inside the Green Line (the 1949 Israel–Jordan demarcation line) and those beyond, and to convey that life in the settlements is as normal as anywhere inside Israel.



Error (Guardian, headline, 6/13/14): Israelis launch search around Hebron after three teenage settlers go missing

Correction (6/16/14): Israelis launch search around Hebron after three teenagers go missing



Error (Guardian, Peter Beaumont, 6/13/14): Israeli security forces have launched a mass search of the Hebron hills after three teenage settlers, one believed to be a US citizen, were reported missing amid fears that they may gave [sic] been kidnapped by a Palestinian group.

Correction (6/16/14): Israeli security forces have launched a mass search of the Hebron hills after three teenagers, one believed to be a US citizen, were reported missing amid fears they may gave [sic] been kidnapped by a Palestinian group.



Error (Independent, Jack Simpson, 6/15/14 ): The students -- two are reported to be 16 and the third 19 -- are said to have disappeared on their journey back to their Israeli settlement from school.

Correction (Online 6/16/14): The students -- two are said to be 16 and the third 19 -- are said to have disappeared close to the Alon Shvut settlement on their journey back home from school.



Error (Haaretz, headline, 5/19/14): Lag Ba'omer in Hebron: Settlers torch Palestinian orchard

Correction (5/20/14): The headline of an article by Yair Ettinger and Amira Hass in yesterday's paper was incorrect. It should have read: "Lag Ba'Omer in Hebron: Settlers light bonfire in Palestinian orchard."



Error (International New York Times, photo caption, 4/27/14): A Palestinian with a gas mask on Friday at an Israeli settlement near Nablus, the West Bank.

Correction (4/30/14): A front-page photo caption in Saturday-Sunday editions misidentified the location of a Palestinian protest over the Jewish settlement of Qadomem. The protest took place near Qadomem, not in it.



Error (Haaretz, photo caption, 4/25/14): A Palestinian woman at the West Bank separation barrier near the Israeli city of Modi'in.

Correction (4/28/14): The caption accompanying an article by Peter Beinart's ("A simple lesson for Israel," April 25) incorrectly identified the Israeli city seen in the background of the West Bank separation barrier. The city in question is Modi'in Ilit.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Kate Linthicum, 4/13/14): [Rapper Tamer Nafar] was channeling Scarlett Johansson for a video sketch skewering the actress for serving as a spokeswoman for SodaStream, a company boycotted by Palestinian activists because it is headquartered in an Israeli settlement in the West Bank.

Correction (4/24/14): Tamer Nafar: A profile of Palestinian rapper Tamer Nafar in the April 13 Arts and Books section said that SodaStream, a company that manufactures beverage carbonation machine, was headquartered in an Israeli settlement in the West Bank. The company has a factory in the West Bank but is headquartered in Lod, Israel.



Error (USA Today, Michele Chabin, 11/29/13): Evangelical Christians don't just farm here beyond the Green Line, Israel's internationally recognized border.

Correction (12/4/13): The description of the Green Line between Israel and the West Bank was misstated in a story Nov. 29 about Israeli settler farms. It is the Israeli-Jordanian armistice line from the 1949 Arab-Israeli war.



Error (Ha'aretz, Op-Ed, Moshe Arens, 12/2/13): [EU bureaucrats] have succeeded in imposing on Israel their demand that scientific cooperation of Israeli scientists with EU scientists, within the framework of the Horizon 2020 program, will be limited to those Israeli scientists who do not reside beyond the 1949 armistice lines or are not associated with institutions located there.

Correction (12/5/13): The article "Science in service of politicians" by Moshe Arens, which was published on Dec. 2, 2013, should have stated that funding limitations in the EU's Horizon 2020 initiative apply to research institutions. They do not apply to individual scientists residing beyond the 1949 armistice lines, as was mistakenly stated.



Error (International New York Times, Mark Landler and Jodi Rudoren, 11/6/13): An absence of progress on the core issues, an ill-timed Israeli plan to build 3,500 more settlements on the West Bank and East Jerusalem. . .

Correction (11/7/13): An article on Wednesday about American efforts to reinvigorate the Middle East peace negotiations stated incorrectly that Israel plans to build 3,500 additional settlements on the West Bank and in East Jerusalem. Israel does not plan more settlements, but it has recently advanced projects for that number of new housing units within existing settlements.



Error (Economist, 5/4/13): So far this year, Israel's army has evicted almost 400 Palestinians from the West Bank and dismantled over 200 homes...

Correction (Online update): So far this year Israel's army has evicted almost 400 Palestinian West Bankers from their homes in Area C...

Error (Ha'aretz, Gili Cohen, 4/3/13): Every professional army officer who does not serve in a front-line unit must spend one week a year protecting these [illegal outpost] settlements.

Correction (4/5/13): An article by Gili Cohen ("IDF regularly deploys soldiers to guard one-quarter of illegal West Bank outposts," April 4), should have stated that every professional army officer who does not serve in a front-line unit must spend one week protecting vulnerable communities on both sides of the Green Line. The original version included a translation of the Hebrew term "yishuvim" as "settlements."



Error (USA Today, Michele Chabin and Vanessa O'Brien, 3/20/13): Palestinians here said Obama should focus on the Israeli checkpoints and a cement security barrier that has prevented Palestinian terrorists from blowing up buses in Israel, but bar all but a few thousand Palestinians from accessing jobs, universities and hospitals in Israel.

Correction (3/25/13): A story on Palestinians in the West Bank on March 20 should have made clear that the number of Palestinians who work in Israel annually exceeds 30,000, and the number who receive medical treatment in Israeli hospitals surpassed 200,000 in 2012, according to Israel's Ministry of Foreign Affairs.



Error (Guardian, Harriet Sherwood, 1/13/13): On Saturday evening, Netanyahu demanded the Israeli supreme court overturn an injunction preventing the removal of the protesters, and ordered the area to be declared a closed military zone. . . .

The activists sought legal protection from the supreme court, which granted an injunction against eviction and gave the state of Israel up to six days to respond.



Correction (1/17/13): On Saturday evening, Netanyahu demanded the Israeli supreme court overturn an injunction preventing the removal of the tents, and ordered the area to be declared a closed military zone. . . .

This article was amended on 14 January and 17 January 2013. Activists were detained but not formally arrested. In addition a sub-heading and text were amended to make clear the Supreme Court injunction referred to tents rather than the protesters. This has been corrected.



Error (Guardian, subheadline, 1/13/13): Israeli military detain activists in early morning swoop on Bab al-Shams encampment despite supreme court ruling

Correction (1/17/13): Israeli military detain activists in early morning swoop on Bab al-Shams . . .

This article was amended on 14 January and 17 January 2013. Activists were detained but not formally arrested. In addition a sub-heading and text were amended to make clear the Supreme Court injunction referred to tents rather than the protesters. This has been corrected.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Maher Abukhater, 1/14/13): Police also removed 25 tents from the area.

Correction (1/16/13): Palestinian tents: An article in the Jan. 14 Section A about a police raid on a tent village set up by Palestinian activists on land that Israel has designated as the site of a new settlement said that the tents were removed. The activists were evicted, but the tents were left standing pending a court appeal.



Error (Guardian, Harriet Sherwood, 1/13/13): According to activists, a large military force surrounded the encampment at around 3am. All protesters were arrested and six were injured, said Abir Kopty. . . .

Palestinian legislator Mustafa Barghouti, who was was among those arrested, said the eviction was "proof that the Israeli government operates an apartheid system."

Correction (Online as of 1/15/13): This article was amended on 14 January 2013. Activists were detained but not formally arrested. This has been corrected.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Ruderon and Mark Landler, 12/1/12): Construction in E1, in West Bank territory that Israel captured in the 1967 war, would connect the large Jewish settlement of Maale Adumim to Jerusalem, dividing the West Bank in two. The Palestinian cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem would be cut off from the capital, making the contiguous Palestinian state endorsed by the United Nations last week virtually impossible.

Correction (12/8/12): Because of an editing error, an article last Saturday about Israel’s decision to move forward with planning and zoning for settlements in an area east of Jerusalem known as E1 described imprecisely the effect of such development on access to the cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem from Jerusalem. While development of E1 would limit access to Ramallah and Bethlehem to narrow corridors far from the Old City and downtown Jerusalem, it would not completely separate those cities from Jerusalem.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Ruderon, 12/2/12): Construction in E1, in West Bank territory that Israel captured in the 1967 war, would connect the large Jewish settlement of Maale Adumim to Jerusalem, dividing the West Bank in two. The Palestinian cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem would be cut off from the capital, making the contiguous Palestinian state endorsed by the United Nations last week virtually impossible. . . Like E1, [construction in Givat Hamatos] too would be a roadblock to plans for a contiguous Palestinian state . .

Correction (12/16/12 (in print); 12/10/12 (online)): An article on Dec. 2 about Israel’s decision to move forward with planning and zoning for settlements in an area east of Jerusalem known as E1 described imprecisely the effect of such development on access to the cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem from Jerusalem, and on the West Bank. Development of E1 would limit access to Ramallah and Bethlehem, leaving narrow corridors far from the Old City and downtown Jerusalem; it would not completely cut off those cities from Jerusalem. It would also create a large block of Israeli settlements in the center of the West Bank; it would not divide the West Bank in two. And because of an editing error, the article referred incompletely to the possibility of a contiguous Palestinian state. Critics see E1 as a threat to the meaningful contiguity of such a state because it would leave some Palestinian areas connected by roads with few exits or by circuitous routes; the proposed development would not technically make a contiguous Palestinian state impossible.



Error (ABC News Web site, Abby D. Phillip, 10/22/12): Obama's relationship with Netanyahu has been rocked by several public strains in the past four years, including disagreements about Israel's expansion of settlements in the Gaza Strip.

Correction (Posted as of 11/4/12): Obama's relationship with Netanyahu has been rocked by several public strains in the past four years, including disagreements about Israel's expansion of settlements in the West Bank.



Error (Guardian, Phoebe Greenwood, 7/23/12): As recently as 8 June, [Catherine Ashton] issued a statement deploring Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu's decision to build an additional 800 settlements in occupied territory -- compensation for the 17 Israeli families the country's high court had ordered to be removed from the Migron settlement.

Correction (Posted online as of 7/24/12): This article was amended on 24 July 2012. The original said Binyamin Netanyahu had decided to build an additional 800 settlements in occupied territory. This has been corrected to 800 homes.



Error (Ha'aretz, Karni Eldad, Op-Ed, 3/25/12): Jewish settlement in Judea and Samaria can be broken down into a number of periods - the settlement period, during which dozens of communities were established (mostly under the Labor Party, and much of it due to President Shimon Peres ); the agricultural period, during which settlers took over land, expelled, planted and sowed . . .

Correction (3/26/12): Due to a translation error, one phrase in an opinion piece by Karni Eldad ("Agricultural apartheid," March 25) was incorrect. The phrase in question should have read: "the agricultural period, during which settlers took over land, cleared stones, planted and sowed."



Error (Yediot Achronot (in Hebrew), Asaf Gefen, Op-Ed, 9/23/11): Although it isn't clear if this [funding from the Ministry of the Development of the Negev and the Galil for a new cultural center in Kiryat Arba] is because Kiryat Arba is in the Negev or because the residents of the place have a practice of shooting their neighbors with a Galil. (CAMERA's translation. A Galil is an Israeli-made semi-automatic machine gun.)

Correction (10/14/11): Contrary to what may have been understood from a previous column, the residents of Kiryat Arba do not have the practice of shooting their Palestinian neighbors.



Error (Washington Post, AP, 12/30/09): Israel's Supreme Court on Tuesday ordered the military to allow Palestinians to travel on the part of a major highway that runs through the West Bank, handing Palestinians their biggest victory yet against Israel's practice of reserving some roads for Jews.

Correction (1/28/10): A Dec. 30 A-section item from the Associated Press, about an Israeli Supreme Court ruling giving Palestinians access to a section of West Bank highway previously closed to them, incorrectly said that Israel reserves some roads for Jews. The country closes some roads to virtually all Palestinians, but they are open to all Israeli citizens and to other nationals, regardless of religious background.



Error (Boston Globe, AP article by Amy Tiebel, 12/30/09): Israel's Supreme Court ordered the military yesterday to allow Palestinians to travel on the part of a major highway that runs through the West Bank, handing Palestinians their biggest victory yet against Israel's practice of reserving some roads for Jews.

Correction (1/5/09): An Associated Press story on Dec. 30 incorrectly stated Israeli restrictions on road travel. Israel reserves some roads for the use of Israeli citizens.



Error (CNN.com, AP, 5/7/08): Israel at 60 is a place where creativity flourishes but where Palestinians are not allowed on West Bank roads reserved for Jews.

Correction (5/19/08): Israel at 60 is a place where creativity flourishes but where Palestinians are not allowed on West Bank roads reserved for Israelis.



Error (AP, Steve Gutkin, 5/7/08): Israel at 60 is a place where creativity flourishes but where Palestinians are not allowed on West Bank roads reserved for Jews.

Correction (5/8/08, Updated story): Israel at 60 is a place where creativity flourishes, but also where Palestinians are not allowed on West Bank roads reserved for Israelis.



Error (AP, Mohammed Daraghmeh, 8/6/07): The Palestinians are eager to restore the situation quickly to what it was before the outbreak of the uprising in September 2000, including assuming full control over West Bank cities again. Israel has agreed in principle, but the military has been slow to remove its West Bank checkpoints and reserves the right to chase Palestinian militants anywhere.

"So far, we are not satisfied with the progress," said Palestinian Information Minister Riad Malki, adding that the West Bank government hopes to "take full security control of the territories."

Correction (Karin Laub, later that day): The Israeli daily Haaretz on Monday cited Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad as telling Israeli officials the Palestinian security forces aren't ready yet to assume control. The report contradicted the official Palestinian position that the West Bank towns should be handed over quickly.

Palestinian Information Minister Riad Malki insisted Monday that Fayyad, in recent meetings with Israeli officials, "affirmed that the Palestinian governemtn is ready to take control of all cities in the West Bank."

However, a senior Palestinian security official in the West Bank town of Bethlehem said his forces need more time and training.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Laura King, 3/11/06): An estimated 3.2 million Palestinians live in the West Bank.

Correction (3/27/06): West Bank: An article in the March 11 Section A incorrectly reported the Palestinian population of the West Bank as 3.2 million. The population numbers are heavily disputed, but the most generally accepted estimate is 2.3 million.



Error (New York Times, Elisabeth Bumiller, 5/27/05): In a gesture to Palestinians, Mr. Bush used the news conference to restate a longstanding policy outlining what the United States expected of Israel. He said that included no expansion of Jewish settlements in the West Bank and the area around Jerusalem, a halt to construction of a barrier that would intrude into Palestinian territory, the removal of Israeli troops from the West Bank and an easing of checkpoints and roadblocks that disrupt life in the West Bank.

Correction (5/30/05): An article on Friday about President Bush’s meeting in Washington on Thursday with Mahmoud Abbas, the Palestinian president, paraphrased incorrectly from Mr. Bush’s remarks at a news conference regarding the barrier that Israel is building in the West Bank. He said the route should take into account the barrier’s impact on Palestinians not engaged in terrorist activities. He did not call for a halt to construction of a barrier that would intrude into Palestinian territory.



Error (Christian Science Monitor, David Clark Scott, 7/19/04): “We stopped at a little store in Efrat, another settler outpost, and he emerged with bottles of mineral water and orange juice,” says Ben.

Correction (7/19/04): Not an Outpost: In this column on July 9, under the title “Principles in Conflict,” we erroneously described a West Bank town where Ben and his Peace Now guide stopped for refreshments. Efrat is a large, well-established settlement under Israeli law.



Error (Las Vegas Review-Journal, AP article by Josef Federman, 7/8/04): By September 2005, Sharon plans to pull all Israeli troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

Correction (7/15/04): In a July 8 story about Israel’s plan to pull its troops out of the Gaza Strip, The Associated Press erroneously reported that Israel also is planning to pull out of the West Bank. The plan calls for a limited withdrawal from four West Bank settlements.



Error (San Francisco Chronicle, AP article by Josef Federman, 7/9/04): By September 2005, Sharon plans to pull all Israeli troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

Correction (7/15/04): An Associated Press story published Friday erroneously reported that Israel plans to pull all its soldiers out of the West Bank. The Israeli plan calls for a limited withdrawal of residents and military guards from four West Bank settlements.



Error (Boston Globe, AP article by Josef Federman, 7/8/04): By September 2005, Sharon plans to pull all troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

Correction (7/16/04): Because of an error by the Associated Press, a story on the July 8 World page about Israel’s plan to pull its troops out of the Gaza Strip incorrectly reported that Israel is also planning to pull out of the West Bank. The plan calls for only a limited withdrawal from four West Bank settlements.



Error (AP, Josef Federman, 7/8/04): By September 2005, Sharon plans to pull all Israeli troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

Correction (7/14/04): In a July 8 story about Israel’s plan to pull its troops out of the Gaza Strip, The Associated Press erroneously reported that Israel is also planning to pull out of the West Bank. The plan only calls for a limited withdrawal from four West Bank settlements.



Error (Chicago Tribune, AP article by Josef Federman, 7/9/04): By September 2005, Sharon plans to pull all Israeli troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

Correction (7/14/04): A stroy on Page 3 Friday reported incorrectly that Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon plans to pull all Israeli troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank by September 2005. The plan does not call for a general troop withdrawal from the West Bank. However, it would withdraw all settlers from Gaza along with the soldiers who guard them. In addition, it would evacuate four isolated settlements in the West Bank and redeploy the soldiers guarding them.



Error (Philadelphia Inquirer, AP article by Josef Federman, 7/9/04): By September 2005, Sharon plans to pull all Israeli troops from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

Correction (7/13/04): An article in the July 9 Inquirer erred in describing Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s plan to withdraw troops from the West Bank. Under the plan, troops would be withdrawn from four West Bank settlements.



Error (Boston Globe, AP, Ali Daraghmeh, 6/11/04): In more than three years of Israeli-Palestinian fighting, Palestinian police have become increasingly ineffective, particularly in the West Bank, where Israel does not allow Palestinian officers to patrol in uniform or with arms.

Correction (7/2/04): Because of an error by the Associated Press, an article in the World pages on June 11 about the United Nations suspending a construction project in a Palestinian refugee camp erroneously reported that Israel does not allow Palestinian officers to patrol in uniform in the West Bank. Current Israeli policy allows for uniformed Palestinian policemen in the area.



Error (AP, Ali Daraghmeh, 6/10/04): In more than three years of Israeli-Palestinian fighting, Palestinian police have become increasingly ineffective, particularly in the West Bank, where Israel does not allow Palestinian officers to patrol in uniform or with arms.

Correction (7/1/04): In a June 10 story about the United Nations suspending a construction project in a Palestinian refugee camp after gunmen threatened crews, The Associated Press erroneously reported that Israel does not allow Palestinian officers to patrol in uniform in the West Bank. Current Israeli policy does allow for uniformed Palestinian policemen in the area.



Error (New York Times, Ian Fisher, 6/10/03): To the angry Israeli settlers who live nearby, the downed tower was a frightening portent: that Mr. Sharon may be willing to bargain away the right they believe that Jews have to inhabit land in the West Bank and Gaza that was seized from Palestinians after the 1967 war.

Correction (6/11/03): An article yesterday about the dismantling of a rusty tower by an Israeli settlement in the West Bank as a gesture of compliance with the American-led peace initiative misstated the origin of Israeli control of the territory. During the 1967 war, Israel seized the West Bank from Jordan and took Gaza from Egypt, not from the Palestinians.