Monday, February 19, 2018
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Corrected

Palestinian Refugees

Error (Times of Israel, TOI staff, 1/27/18): The Palestinians demand this right [of return] not only for those of the hundreds of thousands of refugees who are still alive but also for their descendants, who number in the millions.

Correction (1/28/18): The Palestinians demand this right not only for those of the hundreds of thousands of refugees who are still alive — a figure estimated in the low tens of thousands — but also for their descendants, who number in the millions.



Error (AFP, 11/1/17): The [Balfour] document eventually led to the creation of Israel in 1948, the displacement of millions of Palestinians …

Correction (11/1/17): The [Balfour] document eventually led to the creation of Israel in 1948, the displacement of around 750,000 Palestinians …



Error (AFP, photo caption, 5/15/16): Palestinian refugee Aisha, 53, who says is [sic] a former inhabitant of the town of Beersheva, waves a group of keys outside her home in the Khan Younis refugee camp in the southern Gaza Strip on May 15, 2016, on the 68th anniversary of the "Nakba."

 
"Nakba" means in Arabic "catastrophe" in reference to the birth of the state of Israel 68-years-ago in British-mandate Palestine, which led to the displacement of hundreds of thousands of Palestinians who either fled or were driven out of their homes during the 1948 war over Israel's creation. The key symbolizes the homes left by Palestinians in 1948.


Correction (5/16/16): Palestinian refugee Aisha, 53, who comes from a family originally from Beersheva, shows a collection of keys she said she inherited from her parents of their home and shops in the largest city in the Negev desert before 1948 as she sits outside her house in the Khan Younis refugee camp in the southern Gaza Strip on May 15, 2016, on the 68th anniversary of the "Nakba" …



Error (Toronto Star, photo caption, 5/11/16): The number of Palestinians who were displaced during the 1948 war surrounding Israel’s establishment is estimated at more than five million people.

Correction (Online as of 5/15/16): The number of Palestinians who were displaced during the 1948 war surrounding Israel’s establishment, along with their descendants is estimated at more than five million people. . . .

 
Correction: A photo caption accompanying a photo with this article was edited from a previous version to make clear that the number Palestinians displaced during the 1948 war surrounding Israel’s establishment includes their decedents.



Error (International New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 9/15/14): The United Nations Relief and Works Agency runs schools through the ninth grade for the children of Palestinians who were expelled from or fled homes in Israel and the West Bank, about 70 percent of Gaza's 1.8 million residents.

Correction (9/19/14): Because of an editing error, an article on Monday in the Education section misstated the family history of the students through the ninth grade who attend schools run by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency in Gaza. They are the descendants of Palestinians who were expelled or who fled from homes in Israel and the West Bank, not just the children of those who were expelled or fled. As result of that error, the article misstated the group that makes up about 70 percent of Gaza's 1.8 million residents. It is the descendants of those who were expelled or fled, not the children.



Error (AP, Jamal Halaby, 12/11/10): There is a long history of violence between supporters of the two teams, stemming in part from the decades of tension with Jordan's large Palestinian population, which includes an estimated 1.8 million refugees displaced after Israel's 1948 creation and their descendants.

Correction (12/15/10): Clarification: In a Dec. 11 story about a brawl at a soccer game in Jordan, The Associated Press referred to Jordan's large Palestinian population that includes an estimated 1.8 million refugees displaced after Israel's 1948 creation and their descendants. The story should have made clear that the figure includes people who are either refugees displaced after Israel's 1948 creation or descendants of those refugees.



Error (New York Times, 8/18/10; International Herald Tribune, 8/19/10, Nada Bakri): While about 4.7 million refugees from the Arab-Israeli wars of 1948 and 1967 are spread across the region, many of them in the West Bank, Gaza, Jordan and Syria, the estimated 400,000 in Lebanon have endured some of the most wretched conditions.

Correction (8/21/10 in NY Times, 8/24/10 in Tribune): An article on Wednesday/Thursday [CAMERA notes: Wednesday was noted in the Times and Thursday in the IHT] about the passage of a law in Lebanon granting Palestinian refugees the same rights to work as other foreigners referred imprecisely to the refugees. Although the United Nations now registers about 4.7 million Palestinian refugees throughout the region, most are the descendants of the 700,000 who fled the Arab-Israeli war of 1948 and the 300,000 who fled in 1967.



Error (Washington Post, Abdallah al Salmi, 10/2/05): With 1.3 million Palestinians living in heavily packed refugee camps, subject to IDF jets and militants’ rockets, the 140-square-mile Strip is not a likely setting for a stable and prosperous state.

Correction (10/13/05): An Oct. 2 Outlook article by Abdallah al Salmi, describing life in Gaza since the Israeli withdrawal, stated incorrectly that there are 1.3 million Palestinians living in Gaza refugee camps. That figure is the estimated number of Palestinians in Gaza, of which 961,000 are registered as refugees with the U.N. Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA). An estimated 471,000 live in refugee camps, according to UNRWA.



Error (International Herald Tribune, Neil MacFarquhar, 12/16/04): Economic issues here often come secondary to the emotional desire to see some sort of overall settlement that will return occupied lands, particularly the holy mosque in Jerusalem, and find some solution for millions of Palestinian refugees stuck for generations in camps.

Correction (1/28/05): An article Dec. 16 about a thaw in relations between Egypt and Israel referred imprecisely to the numbers of Palestinian refugees living in refugee camps. Almost 4.2 million Palestinian refugees are officially registered, of whom 1.3 million live in camps, according to United Nations figures. The number of officially registered refugees passed one million in 1957; the camp population passed one million in 1995. Thus the number of Palestinian refugees who have lived in camps for generations is not in the millions. (Official refugee numbers do not reflect Palestinians who fled the West Bank during the 1967 war or their descendants, now believed to exceed 800,000; they are officially considered displaced persons.) This correction was delayed for checking with several refugee organizations.



Error (New York Times, Neil MacFarquhar, 12/16/04): Economic issues here often come secondary to the emotional desire to see some sort of overall settlement that will return occupied lands, particularly the holy mosque in Jerusalem, and find some solution for millions of Palestinian refugees stuck for generations in camps.

Correction (1/27/05): A news analysis article on Dec. 16 about a thaw in relations between Egypt and Israel referred imprecisely to the numbers of Palestinian refugees living in refugee camps. Currently almost 4.2 million Palestinian refugees are officially registered, of whom 1.3 million live in camps, according to United Nations figures. The number of officially registered refugees passed one million in 1957; the camp population passed one million in 1995. Thus the number of Palestinian refugees who have lived in camps for generations is not in the millions. (Official refugee numbers do not reflect Palestinians who fled the West Bank during the 1967 war or their descendants, now believed to exceed 800,000; they are officially considered displaced persons.) The error was reported to The Times on Dec. 16; this correction was delayed for checking with several refugee organizations.



Error (NPR, "Morning Edition," Bob Edwards, 4/15/04): During a meeting at the White House yesterday with Israel’s prime minister, Ariel Sharon, the president also explicitly rejected the right of millions of Palestinians who fled during the Arab-Israeli War of 1948 to return to what is now Israel.

Correction (5/10/04): In a story last month, we referred to millions of Palestinians who fled Israel during the Arab-Israeli war of 1948 and are now seeking the right of return. The actual number at the time they fled was about 750,000, though the population has since grown into the millions.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Laura King, 4/24/04): Palestinians were angered and demoralized by the U.S. endorsement last week of Sharon’s “disengagement” plan, which they say bypasses negotiations on a range of key issues, including the fate of millions of Palestinian refugees who fled or were driven out during Israel’s 1948 war of independence.

Correction (4/29/04): Palestinian refugees–An article Saturday in Section A about an Israeli threat against Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat incorrectly stated that millions of Palestinians fled or were driven out of their homes during Israel’s 1948 War of Independence. In fact, that figure refers to the refugees, who numbered in the hundreds of thousands, and their descendants.



Error (Washington Post, Scott Wilson, 4/16/04): In endorsing a disengagement plan promoted by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, President Bush on Wednesday may have lowered the hopes of Mohammed Dhahir and millions of other Palestinian refugees who have long claimed rights to the land they left behind.

Correction (4/19/04): An April 16 report from Jordan that referred to millions of Palestinian refugees should have noted that this includes the descendants of the refugees who fled in 1948 from lands that are now Israel.



Error (New York Times, James Bennet, 4/14/04): Mr. Sharon wanted three commitments: backing for the Gaza withdrawal, American recognition that Israel would hold on to parts of the West Bank, and an American rejection of the right of millions of Palestinian refugees from the Arab-Israeli war of 1948 and their descendants to return to their lands in what is now Israel.

Correction (4/17/04): A news analysis article on Thursday about President Bush’s endorsement of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s plan to withdraw the Israelis from Gaza referred imprecisely to the number of Palestinian refugees for whom Arabs have demanded the “right of return.” The reference to millions encompassed not just Palestinian refugees from the Arab-Israel war of 1948 but also their descendants.



Error (Chicago Tribune, Tribune news service, 5/7/03): Israel has always objected to the right of return for about 4 million Arabs who fled the war that followed Israel’s creation in 1948. . . .

Correction (5/8/03): In a story on Page 4 of Wednesday’s Main News section, it was incorrectly stated that 4 million Arabs fled the war that followed Israel’s creation in 1948. The correct figure, as mentioned elsewhere in the story, is about 700,000.



Error (St. Petersburg Times, Susan Taylor Martin, 8/1/00): As to whether 3-million Palestinians who left their homes in Israel should be allowed to return, "that will still take some negotiations."

Correction (8/10/00): An Aug. 1 story about Khalil Shikaki, a Palestinian professor, incorrectly reported the number of Palestinians who left Israel in 1948. An estimated 600,000 left then, but Palestinians seek the "right of return" for some 3-million, which includes descendants of the original refugees.



Error (New York Times, Jane Perlez, 7/20/00): It was in these Stockholm talks that some progress was made in defining the territorial shape of a Palestinian state and what might be a possible solution to dealing with the three million Palestinian refugees who were forced to leave Israel after the 1948 Arab-Israeli war and have since been scattered around the Middle East.

Correction (7/21/00): An article yesterday about President Clinton’s decision to hold a Middle East summit meeting at Camp David misstated the number of Palestinian refugees who fled Israel after the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. The United Nations estimated that 725,000 Arabs fled Palestine or Israel between April and December 1948. (Israel declared independence in May 1948.) The number of refugees was not three million.