Wednesday, February 21, 2018
  Home
RSS Feed
Facebook
Twitter
Search:
Media Analyses
Journalists
Middle East Issues
Christian Issues
Names In The News
CAMERA Authors
Headlines & Photos
Errors & Corrections
 Corrected
 Uncorrected
 Dismal Corrections
Film Reviews
CAMERA Publications
Film Suggestions
Be An Activist
Adopt A Library
History of CAMERA
About CAMERA
Join/Contribute
Contact CAMERA
Contact The Media
Privacy Policy
 
Corrected

Terrorism

Error (AFP, 2/20/18): The divergent motivations of the kidnappers become evident when they separate out the Israeli passengers in scenes that chillingly evoke the Holocaust.

Correction (2/20/18): The divergent motivations of the kidnappers become evident in the film when they separate out Jewish passengers, Israelis as well as non-Israelis, in scenes that chillingly evoke the Holocaust.



Error (Jerusalem Post, headline, 11/27/17): Report: ISIS, Israel Temporary 'Allies' Against Iran

Correction (11/29/17): Report: Israel, ISIS Interests Aligned Against Iran



Error (Haaretz, 11/14/17): According to Interior Minister Arye Dery and Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan, the purpose of the visit was to meet with the convicted Palestinian leader Marwan Barghouti at Hadarim Prison, "as part of their support for Barghouti and Palestinian prisoners."

Correction (11/15/17): According to Interior Minister Arye Dery and Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan, the purpose of the visit was to meet with the jailed Palestinian leader Marwan Barghouti at Hadarim Prison, "as part of their support for Barghouti and Palestinian prisoners."

Barghouti was convicted in 2004 of a series of terror-related murders during the second Palestinian intifada and is currently serving five life sentences. …
 
This article was amended on November 15, 2017, to include details of Marwan Barghouti's 2004 conviction on terrorism charges.



Error (New York Times, Rebecca Flint Marx, 11/11/17): Reem’s is one of a handful of Arab bakeries in the Bay Area — but it is likely the only one where you’ll find the children’s book “A Is for Activist” on the shelves and an enormous mural of the controversial Palestinian activist Rasmeah Odeh on the wall.

Correction (11/15/17): Reem’s is one of a handful of Arab bakeries in the Bay Area — but it is likely the only one where you’ll find the children’s book “A Is for Activist” on the shelves and an enormous mural of the controversial Palestinian activist Rasmeah Odeh on the wall. (In 1970, Ms. Odeh was convicted by Israeli courts for her role in the murder of two students. In 2014, she was convicted of immigration fraud in U.S. federal court and deported to Jordan in 2017.) …

 

EDITOR’S NOTE

An earlier version of this article lacked context about the Palestinian activist Rasmeah Odeh, the subject of a mural inside Reem’s. That has been added.

 
 


Error (National Geographic, photo caption, 9/8/17): A Palestinian man walks along the separation wall in Bethlehem near a graffiti of Leila Khaled, a Palestinian activist credited as the first woman to hijack an airplane.

Correction (9/8/17): A Palestinian man walks along the separation wall in Bethlehem near a graffiti of Leila Khaled, a Palestinian credited as the first woman to hijack an airplane.



Error (AFP, photo captions, 8/9/17): Palestinians from the village of Umm Safa, west of Ramallah in the occupied West Bank, check a vehicle that was set ablaze on August 9, 2017 after Israeli settlers reportedly vandalised the Palestinian village calling for vengeance for the killing of two Israeli settlers from the Solomon family. An assailant broke into a home in a Jewish settlement in the occupied West Bank on July 21 and stabbed four Israelis, with two dying from their wounds, the army said.

Correction (8/9/17): The erroneous mention[s] appearing in the metadata of this photo by Abbas Momani has been modified in AFP systems in the following manner: [Palestinians from the village of Umm Safa, west of Ramallah in the occupied West Bank, check a vehicle that was set ablaze on August 9, 2017. Palestinians accuse Israeli settlers of the arson attack on the vehicle in revenge for the stabbing of four Israeli settlers from the Salomon family by a 19-year-old Palestinian assailant on July 21, 2017, which left three of them dead.] Instead of [Palestinians from the village of Umm Safa, west of Ramallah in the occupied West Bank, check a vehicle that was set ablaze on August 9, 2017 after Israeli settlers reportedly vandalised the Palestinian village calling for vengeance for the killing of two Israeli settlers from the Solomon family. An assailant broke into a home in a Jewish settlement in the occupied West Bank on July 21 and stabbed four Israelis, with two dying from their wounds, the army said.] Please immediately remove the erroneous mention[s] from all of your online services and delete it (them) from your servers. If you have been authorized by AFP to distribute it (them) to third parties, please ensure that the same actions are carried out by them. Failure to promptly comply with these instructions will entail liability on your part for any continued or post notification usage. Therefore we thank you very much for all your attention and prompt action. We are sorry for the inconvenience



Error (AFP, photo captions, 7/16/17): Israel took the highly unusual decision to close the Al-Aqsa mosque compound for Friday prayers, leading to anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian. It remained closed on July 15, while parts of Jerusalem's Old City were also under lockdown.

Correction (7/16/17): Israel reopened an ultra-sensitive holy site closed after an attack by Arab Israeli men that killed two policemen, but Muslim worshippers were refusing to enter due to new security measures including metal detectors and cameras.



Error (Herald Sun (Melbourne), headline, 4/2/17): Israeli police kill Palestinian man

Correction (4/3/17): Israeli police kill Palestinian attacker



Error (Reuters, Luke Baker, 1/3/17): Last March, Sergeant Elor Azaria, a 19-year-old Israeli army medic deployed to the occupied West Bank, shot and killed a Palestinian assailant as he lay wounded and motionless on the ground after attempting to stab an Israeli soldier.

Correction (1/4/17): Last March, Sergeant Elor Azaria, a 19-year-old Israeli army medic deployed to the occupied West Bank, shot and killed a Palestinian assailant as he lay wounded and motionless on the ground after stabbing another Israeli soldier.

 
(This story published on Jan. 3 corrects first paragraph to show that soldier was stabbed.)



Error (Times of Israel, AFP, 11/30/16): In October 2015, a wave of violence broke out across Israel and the Palestinian territories.

Correction (12/4/16): Since October 2015, a wave of Palestinian terrorism and violence has seen 36 Israelis, two Americans and an Eritrean national killed in stabbing, car-ramming and shooting attacks. According to AFP figures, some 238 Palestinians, a Jordanian and a Sudanese migrant have also been killed, most of them in the course of carrying out attacks, Israel says, and many of the others in clashes with troops in the West Bank and at the Gaza border, as well as in Israeli airstrikes in the Strip.



Error (Haaretz, Amiram Goldblum, Op-Ed, 11/6/16): In 1991, under the Shamir government, 105 people were killed in terror attacks.

Correction (11/20/16): In 1991, under the Shamir government, 105 people were killed in terror attacks. (This figure includes 75 people who died under various circumstances as a result of rocket attacks against Israel during the Gulf War and were recognized as 'victims of enemy activity.' In my opinion, they were victims of the political tough line of the Israel government toward the Palestinians, like the other victims).



Error (Haaretz, 10/31/16): Palestinian intelligence sources said that they were investigating whether Turkamen may have carried out the attack as revenge after security agents searched his house on Monday, suspecting he may be concealing weapons and ammunitions that he did not need for his police work.

Correction (11/1/16): Palestinian intelligence sources said they were investigating whether Turkamen may have carried out the attack as revenge after Palestinian security agents searched his house on Monday, suspecting he may be concealing weapons and ammunition that he did not need for his police work.



Error (Voice of America, headline, 9/17/16): Israel Kills Palestinian in West Bank

Correction (9/18/16): Israel Kills Palestinian Who Wounded Soldier in West Bank



Error (Forward, headline, 9/16/16): Israeli troops kill 3 Palestinians in West Bank and Jerusalem

Correction (9/18/16): Israeli Troops Kill 3 Palestinian Attackers in West Bank and Jerusalem



Error (USA Today, Shira Rubin, 8/12/16): A Palestinian man used a screwdriver to stab an Israeli man in the neck and back in Jerusalem on Thursday, the first such attack after a five-week lull in assaults by Palestinians that began last fall.

Correction (8/26/16): A previous version of this story misstated the number of Palestinian attacks since July 1. There have been fewer than 10 reported by authorities.



Error (Reuters, headline, 8/24/16): Israeli soldier shoots dead Palestinian driver in West Bank: army

Correction (8/25/16): Palestinian who stabbed Israeli soldier shot dead: army



Error (AFP, July 20, 4:03 AM GMT): The legislation was put forward after three Arab-Israeli opposition lawmakers sparked controversy when they visited relatives of Palestinians killed by Israeli security forces after alleged attacks in Israel.

Correction (AFP, July 20, 11:40 AM GMT): The legislation was put forward after three Arab-Israeli opposition lawmakers sparked controversy when they visited relatives of Palestinians killed by Israeli security forces while carrying out attacks.



Error (New York Times, 7/18/16): A separate study, at Ben Gurion University, found that residents close to attack sites — in this case, those living in Israeli settlements in the Gaza Strip — reported a lower sense of personal threat and stress than those in two other communities, one in a Tel Aviv suburb and one in a larger settlement near the occupied West Bank city of Hebron. The research suggested that the religious fervor of the Gaza residents might have been a key factor.

Correction (Online as of 7/19/16): A separate study, done in 2003-4 at Ben Gurion University, found that residents close to attack sites — in this case, those living in Israeli settlements then in the Gaza Strip — reported a lower sense of personal threat and stress than those in two other communities, one in a Tel Aviv suburb and one in a larger settlement near the occupied West Bank city of Hebron. The research suggested that the religious fervor of the Gaza residents might have been a key factor.



Error (New York Times, subtitle translation, 6/30/16): … but I didn't know my son could be courageous to the point where he would go inside and commit a crime.

Correction (6/30/16): … but I didn't think that my son could be bold to this point, that he would go inside and commit an operation.



Error (New York Times, subtitle translation, 6/30/16): When I find out that someone infiltrated a settlement, I know that they are bold

Correction (6/30/16): And even the action when I find out someone infiltrated a settlement, I know that they are a hero



Error (AFP, 4/6/16): Netanyahu's brother Yonatan was killed in a July 1976 commando raid in Entebbe, Uganda, to free passengers aboard an Air France plane hijacked by Palestinians.

 
By the time the commandoes arrived, all non-Israeli passengers had been released by the hijackers, leaving about 100 Israelis and crew members aboard.


Correction (4/6/16): By the time the commandoes arrived, all non-Israeli and non-Jewish passengers had been released by the hijackers, leaving about 100 hostages.



Error (Reuters, photo captions, 3/31/16): [Ihab] Maswadeh was shot dead by Israeli troops after he attempted to stab an Israeli soldier last December.

Correction (4/4/16):

REFILE - CLARIFYING REFERENCE TO THE STABBING ATTACK A relative of Palestinian Ihab Maswadeh (seen in the poster), who fatally stabbed an Israeli man last December, inspects the damage after the Israeli forces partially demolished Maswadeh's house in the West Bank city of Hebron March 31, 2016.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Kate Shuttleworth, 4/1/16): When video emerged last week of an Israeli soldier apparently shooting a wounded Palestinian protester in the head, killing him instantly, the condemnation was almost instantaneous — from within and without Israel.

Correction (4/2/16): Israeli soldier: An article in the April 1 Section A described a Palestinian who was killed by an Israeli soldier as a protester. He should have been described as an assailant.



Error (Voice of America, headline, 3/14/16): Three Palestinians killed in West Bank attacks

Correction (3/15/16): Israel Military Kills Three West Bank Attackers



Error (Los Angeles Times, Kate Shuttleworth and Rushdi Abu Alouf, 3/13/16): The last missile attack from the Gaza Strip was in October 2015.

Correction (3/15/16): Gaza airstrikes: In the March 13 Section A, an article about a retaliatory airstrike by Israel reported that four missiles fired from the Gaza Strip into Israel last week were the first such projectiles fired since October. The missiles were the first since October to prompt an Israeli response that led to Palestinian deaths.

Fact: For details about the multiple Gaza rocket attacks against Israel since October 2015, including two each in November, December and January, see here.



Error (Haaretz, Amos Harel, 12/24/15): In November, an IDF soldier was killed (and a civilian from Eritrea was beaten to death) during a shooting at the Be'er Sheva bus station carried out by a Bedouin.

Correction (Online 12/27/15): In November, an IDF soldier was killed (and a civilian from Eritrea was fatally shot) during a shooting at the Be’er Sheva bus station carried out by a Bedouin . . . .

 
Clarification: This article was amended on December 27 to correct the cause of death of Eritrean asylum seeker Haftom Zarhum. According to the results of an autopsy, Zarhum died from gunshot wounds and not as a result of the mob beating that followed.



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 12/1/15): The three teenagers are among the 15 women who have tried, or are accused of trying, to stab Israeli soldiers or civilians in the West Bank since an uprising began in October.

Correction (12/5/15): The three teenagers are among the 15 young women who have stabbed, tried to stab or, the Israeli authorities say, intended to stab Israeli soldiers or civilians in the West Bank and Jerusalem since an uprising began in October. . . 

 
An earlier version of this article referred incompletely to the location of the attacks and to the actions of the young women who have joined the violence. The attacks have been in Jerusalem as well as the West Bank, not just the West Bank, and the women have stabbed, tried to stab or, the Israeli authorities contend, intended to stab soldiers and civilians; they have not just tried or been accused of trying to attack. The second incomplete reference also appeared in an earlier version of the capsule summary with this article.



Error (New York Times, headline, 11/27/15): West Bank: Palestinians Killed After Hit-and-Run Attacks

Correction (Online as of 12/1/15): West Bank: Palestinians Killed After Attacks on Troops



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 10/27/15): "He was not carrying a knife, I saw everything," a [Palestinian] witness insisted. "If they show a knife, they planted it."

The Israeli police soon published a photo of a pocketknife, the kind Boy Scouts use, next to the slain teenager."



Correction (11/10/15): The Israeli police soon published a photo of a pocketknife next to the slain young man.
 
An earlier version of this article referred imprecisely to the knife in the Israeli police photo. It is a butterfly knife, which is traditionally used as a weapon. The Boy Scouts of America does not explicitly ban such knives; it endorses pocketknives for general use, and does not sell butterfly knives in its official Scout shop. Butterfly knives are legal in some states, and knife policies are set by individual troops, so it is possible, though unlikely, that some troops approve them. But the knife pictured is not typically “the kind Boy Scouts use."



Error (NBC News Web site, Cassandra Vinograd, Lawajez Jabari and Paul Goldman, 10/14/15 ): Israeli President Benjamin Netanyahu slammed the sea of misinformation and misrepresentation — but himself got the facts wrong, saying a Jewish child had been killed instead of injured — in an impassioned speech telling Palestinian authorities to "stop lying" and inciting violence.

 
"An Arab boy fatally wounds a Jewish child and after that the security forces stop him and prevent him from continuing on a stabbing spree and he becomes a martyr supposedly executed unjustly?" Netanyahu told the Knesset.


Correction (10/19/15): Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu slammed the sea of misinformation and misrepresentation in an impassioned speech telling Palestinian authorities to "stop lying" and inciting violence.

"An Arab boy critically wounds a Jewish child and after that the security forces stop him and prevent him from continuing on a stabbing spree and he becomes a martyr supposedly executed unjustly?" Netanyahu told the Knesset.
 
EDITORS NOTE: An earlier version of this article reported that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told lawmakers that an Arab boy had fatally wounded a Jewish child. That was based on an English translation of Netanyahu's speech posted on his official website. However, the Hebrew translation reflects Netanyahu did not say a Jewish child was killed but rather critically injured. The story below has been updated to reflect that.



Error (LA Times, headline, 10/10/15): Six Palestinians dead as violence grips Gaza, Jerusalem

Correction (Online as of 10/14/15): Violence in Jerusalem, Gaza leaves 6 dead, including stabbing suspects



Error (Los Angeles Times, Batsheva Sobelman, 10/10/15): Two Palestinian teenagers were shot to death in Jerusalem on Saturday, officials said, after they carried out separate stabbing attacks on an ultraorthodox Jew and two Israeli police officers.

Correction (10/11/15): Two Palestinian teenagers were shot to death in Jerusalem on Saturday, officials said, after they carried out separate stabbing attacks on two Israeli civilians and two police officers. . .

 
For the record: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that one Israeli civilian was attacked. Two were the victims of the assaults.



Error (Euronews, headline, 10/11/15): Four hurt in new Israel stabbing attack as Palestinians bury their dead

Correction (10/12/15): Four hurt in latest stabbing attack in Israel

Error (Times of Israel, headline, 10/7/15): Settlers shoot, wound Palestinian teen in clash

Correction (10/7/15): Israelis shoot at mob assailing Jewish woman, injure Palestinian



Error (Los Angeles Times, headline, 9/25/15): Israel will allow police to fire live ammunition at protesters

Correction: Israelis ease restrictions of police firing live rounds during protests

 
For the record: An earlier version of this article's headline overstated the measures approved by Israel's security cabinet. As the article says, police will be authorized to open fire when officers believe that lives are in danger.



Error (New York Times, headline, 9/15/15): Jewish Man Dies as Rocks Pelt His Car in West Bank

Correction (9/16/15): Jewish Man Dies as Rocks Pelt His Car in East Jerusalem . . . .

 
An earlier version of this article's headline misstated where the rock-throwing attack took place. As the article correctly reported, it was in East Jerusalem, not in the West Bank.



Error (Haaretz, Gili Cohen (mistranslated from Hebrew), 7/16/15): Two weeks ago, four people were wounded in a drive-by shooting attack near the West Bank settlement of Shvut Rachel.

Correction (Online 7/16/15):

Two weeks ago, one person was killed and three were wounded in a drive-by shooting attack near the West Bank settlement of Shvut Rachel. . . .
 
This article was amended on July 16, 2015, to include the fact that Malakhi Moshe Rosenfeld, who was wounded in the drive-by shooting on June 29, succumbed to his wounds a day later.



Error (Times of Israel, headline, 4/21/15): In first, Arab slain by Jews added to terror victims monument

Correction (4/21/15): Slain Palestinian teen added to terror victims monument



Error (New York Times, Somini Sengupta, 2/2/15): . . . .during the Gaza conflict, in which Palestinian militants fired hundreds of rockets into Israel . . .

Correction (2/3/15): Because of an editing error, an article on Tuesday about the resignation of the chairman of a United Nations panel investigating possible war crimes in the 50-day Gaza Strip conflict last summer misstated the volume of rockets fired by Palestinian militants into Israel during the conflict. It was in the thousands, not the hundreds.



Error (Haaretz, photo caption, 1/1/15): Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas (C) lights a torch during a rally marking the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Fatah movement, in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Dec. 31, 2014.

Correction (1/4/15): Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas (C) lights a torch during a rally in Ramallah marking the 50th anniversary of Fatah's armed struggle against Israel.



Error (New York Times, editorial, 7/8/14): On Sunday, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel, after days of near silence, condemned that killing and promised that anyone found guilty would "face the full weight of the law.”


Correction (7/9/14): An article on Monday about the arrest of six Israelis in the killing of a Palestinian teenager referred incorrectly to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s response to the killing of Muhammad Abu Khdeir. On the day of the killing, Mr. Netanyahu’s office issued a statement saying he had told his minister for internal security to quickly investigate the crime; it is not the case that “days of near silence” passed before he spoke about it. The error was repeated in an editorial on Tuesday.



Error (Huffington Post UK, Paul Vale, 7/1/14): The deaths [of the three Israeli teens] let to a night of bombing by the Israeli Air Force, after Netanyahu promised Hamas would pay for the killings.

Correction (7/2/14): The Israeli Air Force has continued with airstrikes targeting the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip, in retaliation for militant rocket attacks launched against Jewish communities in southern Israel over the past two days.



Error (Haaretz, blog live update, 6/22/14): A Palestinian armed with a grenade was apprehended by security forces near the settlement of Sde Avraham.

Correction (6/22/14): A Palestinian armed with a grenade was apprehended by security forces near Sde Avraham, an Israeli community near the Gaza Strip.



Error (Guardian, headline, 6/13/14): Israelis launch search around Hebron after three teenage settlers go missing

Correction (6/16/14): Israelis launch search around Hebron after three teenagers go missing



Error (Guardian, Peter Beaumont, 6/13/14): Israeli security forces have launched a mass search of the Hebron hills after three teenage settlers, one believed to be a US citizen, were reported missing amid fears that they may gave [sic] been kidnapped by a Palestinian group.

Correction (6/16/14): Israeli security forces have launched a mass search of the Hebron hills after three teenagers, one believed to be a US citizen, were reported missing amid fears they may gave [sic] been kidnapped by a Palestinian group.



Error (Independent, Jack Simpson, 6/15/14 ): The students -- two are reported to be 16 and the third 19 -- are said to have disappeared on their journey back to their Israeli settlement from school.

Correction (Online 6/16/14): The students -- two are said to be 16 and the third 19 -- are said to have disappeared close to the Alon Shvut settlement on their journey back home from school.



Error (Times of Israel, Mitch Ginsburg and Itamar Sharon, 6/13/14): The most recent fatal attack had been the November 2013 stabbing murder of 19-year-old soldier Eden Atias....

Correction (Online as of 6/13/14):

In April, Baruch Mizrachi, a 47-year-old father of five was gunned down while driving to Passover seder outside the West Bank city of Hebron.

In November 2013, 19-year-old soldier Eden Atias was stabbed by a Palestinian teenager during a bus ride in the northern town of Afula.



Error (Ha'aretz, 6/6/13): The Palestinian teenager, now 19 years old, was raped six years ago by four Palestinian youths near the West Bank's Hizma roadblock, near Jerusalem.

Correction (6/14/13): In the article "Judge who said 'some girls enjoy rape' resigns, loses PM's support for Likud post" (June 6, 2013), the rape victim was mistakenly identified as a Palesitnian. The victim is an Israeli citizen who had returned to the court with the goal of being recognized by the Defense Ministry as a victim of terror.



Error (Washington Post, Joel Greenberg, 1/5/13): The Fatah party of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas held a mass rally in Gaza on Friday to mark the 48thanniversary of its founding ….

Correction (1/8/13): A Jan. 5 A-section article about a mass rally in the Gaza Strip incorrectly said that it marked the 48th anniversary of the founding of the Palestinian political party Fatah. The rally commemorated the 48th anniversary of Fatah's first armed mission against Israel.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Jeffrey Fleishman and Edmund Sanders, 8/6/12): A Sinai militant group, which included at least one extremist from Saudi Arabia, released a video last week claiming responsibility for a June attack along the border that killed one Israeli soldier.

Correction (8/8/12): Israeli border violence: In the Aug. 6 Section A, an article about an attack by militants along Israel's border with Egypt said that an Israeli slain during a previous assault in June was a soldier. The victim was a civilian.



Error (BBC Web site, 7/29/09): Haj Amin al-Husseini was a Palestinian nationalist leader who led violent campaigns against Jewish immigrants ...

Correction (Updated story, 8/4/09): Haj Amin al-Husseini was a Palestinian nationalist leader who led violent campaigns against Jews ...



Error (Los Angeles Times, Mousa Abu Marzook, Op-Ed, 1/6/09): In the six-month period preceding this week's bombardment, one Israel was killed. . .

Correction (1/14/09): Israeli deaths: A Jan. 6 Opinion article by Mousa Abu Marzook suggested that only one Israeli had died as a result of Palestinian violence in the six months preceding the current Israeli operation in Gaza. In fact, five Israelis died during that period.



Error (NPR, Frank Browning, 5/29/07): The French Foreign Ministry called on both Israel and Palestinian fighters to curb the violence and return to the established cease fire. The statement strongly condemns Palestinian rocket attacks into Israel launched from Gaza and - while noting Israel’s legitimate rights of self defense - it called on the Israelis to exercise restraint. 46 Palestinians and two Israeli soldiers have died in recent days...

Correction (6/1/07): Here's another correction. In a news story on Monday, NPR stated that 46 Palestinians and two Israeli soldiers died in recent rocket attacks in and around Gaza. In reality, the two Israelis killed were not soldiers; they were civilians.



Error (International Herald Tribune, Patrick Seale, Op-Ed, 10/28/06): The killing continues on a daily basis – by tank and sniper fire, by air and sea bombardment, and by undercover teams in civilian clothes sent into Arab territory to ambush and murder, an Israeli specialty perfected over the past several decade. . . . Five Israelis have been killed by these [Qassam] rocket attacks in the past six years.

Correction (11/08/06): An article on Oct. 28, "Israel's scandalous siege of Gaza," gave an incorrect number for the Israelis killed by rockets fired from Gaza. The correct number is nine. The article also misstated that Palestinians in Gaza have been bombed and killed "on a daily basis" since June 25. According to the Palestine Red Crescent Society, 347 Palestinians have been killed in that period in the West Bank and Gaza, but the casualties have not occurred on every day. 



Error (AFP, 9/14/06): Since the Palestinian uprising broke out, militants have fired thousands of homemade rockets towards Israel, in attacks that have killed five people.

Correction (9/14/06): Since the second Palestinian uprising broke out in 2000, eight people inside Israel have been killed in rocket attacks from Gaza, according to the army.

CAMERA: An additional five people -- a Chinese worker, a Thai worker, two Palestinian workers, a Palestinian girl -- were killed by Palestinian rocket attacks in Gaza. The latter was killed by a rocket meant for Israel that fell short, and the others were killed in the then Jewish settlement of Ganei Tal.



Error (Guardian, Patrick Seale, 7/3/06): Qassam rockets being fired from Gaza "have so far not killed anyone..."

Correction: (7/7/2006): We said in error in a column that the homemade rockets launched from northern Gaza into Israel had not so far killed anyone (Anything but negotiation, page 29, July 3). In fact 13 deaths have been recorded, according to various sources.



Error (International Herald Tribune, (NYT), 11/5-6/05): Israel began a 10-day period of commemoration and soul-searching on Friday, the 10th anniversary of the killing of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin by an angry settler trying to block progress toward peace with Palestinians.

Correction (11/9/05): A brief in some Saturday-Sunday editions misidentified the man who killed Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin 10 years ago. The assassin, Yigal Amir, is a former soldier, but was not a settler.

CAMERA notes: The Tribune’s identification of Amir as a former soldier is bizarre, and somewhat irrelevant, given that most of the adult Israeli population are former soldiers.



Error (New York Times, Steven Erlanger, 11/5/05): Israel began 10 days of commemorations on the 10th anniversary of the assassination of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin by a settler trying to block progress toward peace with the Palestinians.

Correction (11/9/05): A report in the the World Breifing column on Saturday about commemorations of the 10th anniversary of the assassination of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel misstated the assassin’s background. He was a militant Orthodox opponent of the government, not a settler.



Error (New York Times, Douglas Jehl, 8/1/05): The United States has long listed Syria as a sponsor of terrorism, though the State Department's annual report on terrorism notes that the Syrian government has not been implicated in a terrorist act since 1986, when its intelligence service was involved in the attempted bombing of a British Airways passenger jet.

Correction (8/2/2005): An article yesterday about the Bush administration's order for a freeze on assets controlled by two senior Syrian intelligence officials in American financial institutions misidentified the operator of the flight that was the target of an attempted bombing in which Syria was implicated in 1986. It was El Al, not British Airways.



Error (AP, Frank Bass and Randy Herschaft, 1/24/04): President Nixon created the group in September 1972 after Palestinian commandos slaughtered 11 Israeli athletes at the Munich Olympic Games.

Correction (1/24/04): But these threats were compiled in weekly CIA reports more than 30 years ago for the Cabinet Committee to Combat Terrorism, a Nixon-era task force created after the killings of 11 Israeli athletes at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich.



Error (San Francisco Chronicle, Gail Bensinger, 11/11/04): That, in turn, gave rise to the Black September terrorist organization, which assassinated Jordanian Prime Minister Wasfi Tel in 1971 and the next year killed nine Israeli athletes at the Munich Olympics.

Correction (12/3/04): The obituary of Yasser Arafat on Nov. 11 misstated the number of Israelis killed by Palestinian terrorists at the 1972 Munich Olympics. Ten athletes and a coach died.



Error (Los Angeles Times, letter by Marc Springer of Chantilly, Va., 11/29/04): The numbers say it all, in more than four years of violence, some 900 Israelis have been killed, the majority soldiers, and more than 3,5000 Palestinians, the majority civilians. . . .

Correction (12/4/04): Mideast conflict – A letter Nov. 29 said soldiers were the majority of the 900 Israelis killed in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict since 2000. The majority have been civilians.



Error (Boston Globe, Washington Post article by John Ward Anderson, 7/12/04): The bombing yesterday near a bus stop in central Tel Aviv was the first Palestinian attack inside Israel since a March 14 double suicide bombing at the seaport of Ashdod that killed 10 people, and it was the first in Tel Aviv in more than 14 months.

Correction (7/30/04): A Washington Post story on July 12 about a bomb attack that killed an Israeli woman at a Tel Aviv bus stop said it was the first Palestinian attack inside Israel since a double suicide bombing in Ashdod killed 12 people in March. On June 28, Palestinian militants fired homemade rockets from inside the Gaza Strip, killing an Israeli man and boy in the Israeli town of Sderot.



Error (NPR, Craig Windham, 7/11/04): It [the bombing in Tel Aviv today] was the first deadly attack in Israel in four months.

Correction (7/29/04): On July 11th, our newscast described a bombing in Tel Aviv that day as the first “deadly attack” in Israel in four months. That was incorrect. A rocket fired on an Israeli community near the Gaza Strip killed two people on June 28th.



Error (NPR, "Weekend Edition," Linda Gradstein, 5/2/04): An Israeli army spokesman said two Palestinians attacked an Israeli vehicle at the entrance to the Gush Katif block of Jewish settlements in Gaza, killing a mother and her children. . . . The army spokesman said the militants fired at the vehicle and used an explosive device.

Correction (5/9/04): In a newscast last Sunday about the killing of an Israeli mother and her children by two Palestinian gunmen, we attributed the description of the gunmen as militants to an Israeli army spokesman. The spokesman’s statement used the word “terrorists,” not “militants.”



Error (NPR, "Morning Edition," Paul Brown, 4/1/04): Israeli troops have arrested 12 men they say were wanted militants who had taken cover in a Bethlehem psychiatric hospital. Israeli security sources say the men were planning suicide attacks in Israel.

Correction (4/26/04): First, a correction of a term that was used in a newscast earlier this month. Israeli military officials were quoted as saying they had arrested 12 men who were “wanted militants.” But the actual phrase used by the Israeli military was “wanted terrorists.”



Error (Chicago Tribune, Joel Greenberg, 3/22/04): He [Yassin] said that “Israel will pay for its crimes” and that Hamas would continue resisting occupation, a phrase that generally refers to bombing and shooting attacks on Israelis in the West Bank and Gaza.

Correction (3/27/04): Stories Jan. 17 and March 22 gave an incomplete explanation of what the militant group Hamas means when it talks about resisting Israeli occupation. Hamas says it considers Israel, as well as the West Bank and Gaza Strip, to be occupied land, so its use of the term resistance can refer to attacks inside Israel as well as Israelis in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.



Error (New York Times, Christopher Marquis, 10/16/03): Mr. Powell said he spoke with Israel's foreign minister, Silvan Shalom, and with Mr. Qurei on Wednesday. He called on both sides to end terrorism, but, in particular, he warned the Palestinians that their aspirations for statehood could be set back by violence.

Correction (10/18/03): An article on Wednesday about President Bush's condemnation of the assault that killed three Americans in Gaza referred imprecisely to comments by Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, who called the Israeli foreign minister and the Palestinian prime minister to express outrage. While he said he “made clear to them, in the strongest possible terms, the need to move urgently to end terrorism,” he did not call on “both” sides to end terrorism or otherwise suggest that Israel was supporting terrorist activities.



Error (Reuters, Nidal al-Mughrabi, 10/16/03): The announcement of the arrests came as international pressure mounted on Palestinian authorities to crack down on militants after the bombing, the first to kill Americans during a three-year-old uprising against Israel for statehood.

Correction (10/16/03, subsequent stories): They announced the arrests as international pressure mounted on Palestinian authorities to crack down on militants after the bombing of an American diplomatic convoy. It was the first to kill Americans during a three-year-old Palestinian uprising against Israel for statehood.



Error (Chicago Tribune, HealthDay, 8/10/03): In a three-year round of terrorism that has left 472 dead [in Israel] and 3,846 injured, no studies had looked at the psychological impact of the violence until now, the authors asserted.

Correction (8/17/03): The Discoveries column in the Q section Aug. 10 misstated the number of terrorism casualties in Israel over the last three years. The Israel Defense Forces Web site put the numbers at 820 dead and 5,640 injured after an update Thursday.



Error (NPR, Craig Windham, 7/21/03): A Palestinian militant was killed over night in a bomb attack on a military vehicle near the West Bank city of Jenin, according to the Israeli army.

Correction (8/13/03): We want to correct one story from a few weeks ago. In a broadcast on July 21st, we said that a Palestinian militant had been killed in a bomb attack on an Israeli military vehicle and we attributed this statement to the Israeli army. The official army statement actually used the word terrorist, not militant.



Error (San Jose Mercury News, Aaron Davis, 5/9/03): A missile attack Thursday killed a member of the militant Palestinian group Hamas and sent a fragile cease-fire up in smoke. Hamas leaders who just days before had tentatively agreed to halt suicide attacks against Israel for two years vowed quick retaliation and called for “open battle against the Zionists.”

Correction (5/28/03): A front-page article May 7 and an article May 9 in the World report incorrectly stated that Hamas, the Islamic Resistance Movement, which has launched numerous suicide attacks against Israelis, had agreed to a two-year cease-fire. There was no cease-fire. At that time, Hamas commanders in the Gaza Strip were in talks with the new Palestinian leadership and had reached a tentative agreement on a cease-fire, according to Hamas and Palestinian leadership sources. That accord, however, had not been approved by the political leadership of Hamas.



Error (BBC News, on-line, 5/3/03): The US also want Syria to crack down on the presence in Damascus of groups such as Hamas and Islamic Jihad which are blamed for attacks against Israel.

Correction (Later that day): The US also want Syria to crack down on the presence in Damascus of groups such as Hamas and Islamic Jihad which launch attacks on Israel.

Error (ABC World News Tonight, Peter Jennings, 4/24/03): In the Israeli- occupied Palestinian territories today, a Palestinian suicide bomber killed an Israeli security guard and injured 14 other people. He blew himself up at a train station during the morning rush hour. This is the first suicide attack in nearly a month.

Correction (4/25/03): Speaking of the violence, we made a mistake last night on our broadcast. Yesterday's suicide attack by a Palestinian on Israelis took place in Israel itself, very near but not in the occupied territories, as we said.



Error (Boston Globe, photo caption, 9/5/02): Initisar and Kifah Ajouri, expelled from the West Bank for being kin of alleged terrorist Ali Ajouri, in Gaza City.

Correction (9/6/02): Because of an editing error, a photo caption in yesterday’s World section incorrectly characterized the reason for the expulsion of Intisar and Kifah Ajouri from the West Bank. According to the Israeli army, the Ajouris assisted their brother in preparations for a July suicide bombing in Tel Aviv, and the Israeli Supreme Court ruled the pair posed a security risk to Israel.



Error (NPR, “Morning Edition” headline, 6/21/02): Israeli officials say Palestinian commandos stormed a house in a Jewish settlement on the West Bank last night killing five people.

Correction (posted later on web site): From NPR News reports, heard on Morning Edition, June 21, 2002: In 7:30 a.m. news headlines during the Morning Edition broadcast on June 21, the newscaster misspoke. She quoted Israeli officials as saying Palestinian commandos stormed a house in a Jewish settlement on the West Bank, killing five people. Israel officials did not identify the Palestinian gunmen as commandos. The news spot was never broadcast again. NPR regrets the error.



Error (New York Times, William Orme, 7/12/01): Though Palestinians have made no fatal attacks on Israelis in the last several days, Mr. Peres said he did not believe the Palestinians were yet making the requisite ‘100 percent effort’ to control violence.

Correction (7/14/01): An article on Thursday about Foreign Minister Shimon Peres’s views on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict misstated the extent of recent violence by Palestinians. There had in fact been a fatal attack by Palestinians on an Israeli in the previous several days; an Israeli officer died after a bomb exploded under his vehicle Sunday night.



Error (St. Petersburg Times, Susan Taylor Martin, 8/1/00): As to whether 3-million Palestinians who left their homes in Israel should be allowed to return, "that will still take some negotiations."

Correction (8/10/00): An Aug. 1 story about Khalil Shikaki, a Palestinian professor, incorrectly reported the number of Palestinians who left Israel in 1948. An estimated 600,000 left then, but Palestinians seek the "right of return" for some 3-million, which includes descendants of the original refugees.



Error (Philadelphia Inquirer, Gwynne Dyer, 5/3/00): Then came Victor Ostrovsky, formerly a colonel in Mossad, the Israeli secret service. Ostrovsky already had revealed that the bombing in Libya in 1986, ordered by President Ronald Reagan after U.S. intelligence intercepted a radio message implying Libyan responsibility for the bombing of the La Belle disco in Berlin where two American servicemen were killed, was actually the result of an Israeli deception. It was a Mossad unit, operating secretly in Libya, that really generated the radio message that fooled Reagan into trying to kill Gadhafi – and the 1988 message implying Libyan responsibility for Lockerbie was so similar to the La Belle message, Ostrovsky will testify, that it was almost certainly produced by the same Mossad unit.

Correction (7/21/00): In a May 3 Gwynne Dyer column, informant Victor Ostrovsky was quoted as alleging that Mossad, the Israeli secret service, was involved in a plot to blame Libya for the bombing of the La Belle disco in Berlin in 1986, and subsequently in an attempt to implicate Libya in the bombing of Pan Am 103. It has become clear since then that Ostrovsky is not a credible source for these allegations, and the columnist wishes them withdrawn.



Error (Jane’s Foreign Report,11/18/99): As the Middle East peace process moves forward, Hamas the Palestinian resistance movement is looking for new methods to sabotage it. These efforts, notably Palestinian suicide attacks, started after a massacre in Hebron in which a Jewish settler, Barouch Goldstein, killed more than 20 Muslim worshippers.

Correction (3/23/00): In our report last November, we said the massacre of Palestinians by a Jewish settler, Boruch Goldstein [sic], on February 25th 1994 set off a wave of suicide bombings. In fact, suicide bombings preceded the massacre and continued after it.