Sunday, February 25, 2018
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Corrected

Violence Since 2000

Error (Tablet, Liel Leibovitz, 10/10/17): How grim does the future look? Immediately after the game, a small group of fans charged the field. One of them was arrested as he was dashing towards Isco, Real Madrid's spectacular midfielder. He was carrying a knife.

 


Correction (10/30/17): [Paragraph above deleted]
 
An earlier version of this piece incorrectly reported that, following the game, an Israeli fan had burst into the pitch carrying a knife. Subsequent reports do not support this allegation. We regret the error.



Error (Tablet, sub-headline, 10/10/17 ): And, seeking revenge, Israeli fan charges the field with a knife



Correction (10/31/17): And the future doesn't look much better …
 
An earlier version of this piece incorrectly reported that, following the game, an Israeli fan had burst into the pitch carrying a knife. Subsequent reports do not support this allegation. We regret the error.



Error (AFP, photo captions, 7/16/17): Israel took the highly unusual decision to close the Al-Aqsa mosque compound for Friday prayers, leading to anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian. It remained closed on July 15, while parts of Jerusalem's Old City were also under lockdown.

Correction (7/16/17): Israel reopened an ultra-sensitive holy site closed after an attack by Arab Israeli men that killed two policemen, but Muslim worshippers were refusing to enter due to new security measures including metal detectors and cameras.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Kate Shuttleworth, 4/1/16): When video emerged last week of an Israeli soldier apparently shooting a wounded Palestinian protester in the head, killing him instantly, the condemnation was almost instantaneous — from within and without Israel.

Correction (4/2/16): Israeli soldier: An article in the April 1 Section A described a Palestinian who was killed by an Israeli soldier as a protester. He should have been described as an assailant.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Kate Shuttleworth and Rushdi Abu Alouf, 3/13/16): The last missile attack from the Gaza Strip was in October 2015.

Correction (3/15/16): Gaza airstrikes: In the March 13 Section A, an article about a retaliatory airstrike by Israel reported that four missiles fired from the Gaza Strip into Israel last week were the first such projectiles fired since October. The missiles were the first since October to prompt an Israeli response that led to Palestinian deaths.

Fact: For details about the multiple Gaza rocket attacks against Israel since October 2015, including two each in November, December and January, see here.



Error (New York Times, headline, 9/15/15): Jewish Man Dies as Rocks Pelt His Car in West Bank

Correction (9/16/15): Jewish Man Dies as Rocks Pelt His Car in East Jerusalem . . . .

 
An earlier version of this article's headline misstated where the rock-throwing attack took place. As the article correctly reported, it was in East Jerusalem, not in the West Bank.



Error (Haaretz, Chaim Levinson, 12/31/14): In November Palestinian reports said that settlers set fire to a mosque in the village of Moughayer. Worshippers arriving for morning prayers put out the fire.

Correction (1/1/15): In November Palestinian reports said that settlers set fire to a mosque in the village of Mughayer. Worshipers arriving for morning prayers put out the fire. Israeli firefighters subsequently determined that a fire at a mosque in early November was an electrical fire, rather than an act of arson as was previously believed.



Error (Haaretz, 10/19/14): Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas said his administration would take legal action "at the international level" to stop Jewish settlers from attacking the Al-Aqsa mosque compound, which Jews refer to as the Temple Mount.

Correction (Online as of 10/26/014): Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas said his administration would take legal action "at the international level" to stop what he called attacks by Jewish settlers at the Al-Aqsa mosque compound, which Jews refer to as the Temple Mount.



Error (Washington Post, Sudarsan Raghavan, 7/30/14): In 2000, the second Palestinian intifada, or uprising, erupted in protest of Israel's occupation and expansion of settlements.

Correction (8/5/14): A July 30 A-section article on Palestinians in the West Bank who are separated from relatives in the Gaza Strip incorrectly reported that Israel imposed a "total" blockade on Gaza in 2007. Israel restricts, but does not completely prohibit, the movement of goods, resources and people between its territory and Gaza. The article also incorrectly said that the second Palestinian intifada, or uprising, in 2000 was a response to the Israeli occupation and expansion of settlements. While those were long-standing factors that contributed to Palestinian grievances against Israel, there were multiple triggers for the uprising, and whether it was spontaneous or planned is the subject of debate.



Error (Huffington Post UK, Paul Vale, 7/1/14): The deaths [of the three Israeli teens] let to a night of bombing by the Israeli Air Force, after Netanyahu promised Hamas would pay for the killings.

Correction (7/2/14): The Israeli Air Force has continued with airstrikes targeting the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip, in retaliation for militant rocket attacks launched against Jewish communities in southern Israel over the past two days.



Error (Guardian, headline, 6/13/14): Israelis launch search around Hebron after three teenage settlers go missing

Correction (6/16/14): Israelis launch search around Hebron after three teenagers go missing



Error (Guardian, Peter Beaumont, 6/13/14): Israeli security forces have launched a mass search of the Hebron hills after three teenage settlers, one believed to be a US citizen, were reported missing amid fears that they may gave [sic] been kidnapped by a Palestinian group.

Correction (6/16/14): Israeli security forces have launched a mass search of the Hebron hills after three teenagers, one believed to be a US citizen, were reported missing amid fears they may gave [sic] been kidnapped by a Palestinian group.



Error (Independent, Jack Simpson, 6/15/14 ): The students -- two are reported to be 16 and the third 19 -- are said to have disappeared on their journey back to their Israeli settlement from school.

Correction (Online 6/16/14): The students -- two are said to be 16 and the third 19 -- are said to have disappeared close to the Alon Shvut settlement on their journey back home from school.



Error (AP, 5/28/14): Israeli police say masked protesters hurled stones at policemen standing at the gates of the a sensitive Jerusalem holy site, prompting security forces to enter the compound and disperse the demonstrators.

Correction (5/28/14): Masked Palestinian protesters hurled stones at policemen manning the gates of a sensitive Jerusalem holy site on Wednesday, prompting security forces to enter the compound and disperse the demonstrators, Israeli police said.



Error (International New York Times, photo caption, 4/27/14): A Palestinian with a gas mask on Friday at an Israeli settlement near Nablus, the West Bank.

Correction (4/30/14): A front-page photo caption in Saturday-Sunday editions misidentified the location of a Palestinian protest over the Jewish settlement of Qadomem. The protest took place near Qadomem, not in it.



Error (Ha'aretz, 6/6/13): The Palestinian teenager, now 19 years old, was raped six years ago by four Palestinian youths near the West Bank's Hizma roadblock, near Jerusalem.

Correction (6/14/13): In the article "Judge who said 'some girls enjoy rape' resigns, loses PM's support for Likud post" (June 6, 2013), the rape victim was mistakenly identified as a Palesitnian. The victim is an Israeli citizen who had returned to the court with the goal of being recognized by the Defense Ministry as a victim of terror.



Error (Ha'aretz, photo caption, 5/16/12): Palestinians clashing with IDF forces in Ramallah yesterday

Correction (5/17/12): A photograph in Haaretz on May 16 incorrectly identified the location of clashes between Palestinians and IDF soldiers. The incident took place at the Ofer detention center, on the outskirts of Ramallah, and not as published.



Error (Yediot Achronot (in Hebrew), Asaf Gefen, Op-Ed, 9/23/11): Although it isn't clear if this [funding from the Ministry of the Development of the Negev and the Galil for a new cultural center in Kiryat Arba] is because Kiryat Arba is in the Negev or because the residents of the place have a practice of shooting their neighbors with a Galil. (CAMERA's translation. A Galil is an Israeli-made semi-automatic machine gun.)

Correction (10/14/11): Contrary to what may have been understood from a previous column, the residents of Kiryat Arba do not have the practice of shooting their Palestinian neighbors.



Error (AFP, 1/6/11): Mahmud Zahar made the remarks during a memorial ceremony for 43 Palestinians who were killed at a UN school in the Jabaliya refugee camp during Israel's 22-day war on Gaza that began in December 2008. . .

Zahar was speaking on the second anniversary of an Israeli air strike on the United Nations' Al-Fakhura school in the northern Gaza Strip. . . .

Before an auidence that included members of the Hamas leadership in Gaza, Zahar paid tribute to those who died in the school where they had taken refuge from the heavy fighting.



Correction (1/11/11): ATTENTION - CORRECTION: In Israel-Palestinians-conflict-Gaza-Holocaust-Jews moved Jan. 6, please read in paras 2,4 and 6 xxx near a UN school xxx sted at as sent. Herewith a corrected repeat:///

Mahmud Zahar made the remarks during a memorial ceremony for 43 Palestinians who were killed near a UN school in the Jabaliya refugee camp during Israel's 22-day war on Gaza that began in December 2008. . . .

Zahar was speaking on the second anniversary of an Israeli air strike near the United Nations' Al-Fakhura school in the northern Gaza Strip. . . .

Before an audience that included members of the Hamas leadership in Gaza, Zahar paid tribute to those who died near the school where they had taken refuge from the heavy fighting.



CAMERA: Furthermore, the figure of 43& casualties from the Al-Fakhura Street incident is heavily disputed, and has not been proven. The Goldstone Report (hardly friendly towards Israel), acknowledged that it did not have definitive information on the number of casualties, but cited far fewer than 43. Paragraph 661 says that the reported three shells which hit "al-Fakhura Street killed at least 24 people. The witnesses estimate that up to another 40 were injured by the blasts. The Mission has not been able to verify those figures, but having inspected the site and viewed the footage, it does not consider these numbers to be exaggerated." (Emphasis added.) The Palestinian Center for Human Rights (PCHR), in its list of casualties from the winter fighting, only identifies 18 Palestinians who were killed "opposite" or "near" the Al-Fakhura school on Jan. 6.  The Israeli military, in an investigation of the incident, found that 12 to 17 people were killed in the strike, including several fighters (Jerusalem Post, April 24, 2009).
 
In addition, the tendentious language ought to have been corrected. Israel did not launch a war "on Gaza," as witnessed by the tons of aid that Israel transferred to the Gaza Strip during the fighting. Rather, Israel launched a war on Hamas.



Error (Boston Globe, H.D.S. Greenway op-ed, 9/7/10): Arafat finally died, holed up in a bunker under Israeli siege.

Correction (10/5/10): In my last column I incorrectly wrote that Yasser Arafat died on the West Bank. He was evacuated to France and died in a French hospital.



Error (Toronto Star, Op-Ed by Haroon Siddiqui, 11/14/04): A top Sharon adviser has conceded that the prime minister's real intent is to prevent the emergence of a true Palestinian state. If so, it is in conformity with his lifelong agenda and also the kind of thinking expressed in 2002 by Moshe Yaalon, army chief of staff: "The Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people."

Correction (8/8/09): A Nov. 14, 2004, column about the death of Yasser Arafat included an unverified quotation attributed to former Israel Defence Forces chief of staff Moshe Yaalon.

Yaalon, now Israel's strategic affairs minister, was quoted in that 2004 column as saying in 2002 that "the Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people."

That quotation, while widely cited over the years, did not appear in the 2002 interview published in the Israeli newspaper Haaretz, to which it has been attributed. Alon Ofek-Arnon, a spokesman for Yaalon, told the Star in an email that Yaalon never said this. As well, in a correction about this same quote published March 6, 2009, by the Chicago Tribune, Ari Shavit, the writer of the 2002 Haaretz article, said Yaalon did not say that. The Star has been unable to reach Shavit.



Error (Wall Street Journal, Charles Levinson, 1/12/09): The U.N. resumed aid deliveries in the Gaza Strip on Sunday, two days after it halted them following an incident in which Israeli soldiers fired on U.N. workers in two separate incidents, killing one and injuring two, a spokesman said

Correction (1/18/09): Israel's military investigated an incident in which a United Nations spokesman alleged Israeli forces fired on a U.N. truck on Jan. 8. Israel said the investigation showed its forces had not fired on the truck. A Jan. 12 World News article citing the U.N. allegation didn't include Israel's statement on the event.



Error (New York Times, online letter by Alison Weir, 2/24/08): In our two-year study -- from Sept. 29, 2000, to Sept. 28, 2001, and in 2004 -- of The Times's coverage of Israel and Palestine, we discovered that the newspaper had covered Israeli children's deaths at a rate seven times greater than it reported on Palestinian children's deaths.

Correction (Online correction, 3/7/08): A letter online on Feb. 24 stated that a two-year study by If Americans Knew -- from Sept. 29, 2000, to Sept. 28, 2001, and in 2004 -- of The New York Times's coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict ''discovered that the newspaper had covered Israeli children's deaths at a rate seven times greater than it reported on Palestinian children's deaths.'' This study examined headlines or first paragraphs of news articles.

CAMERA (See here for more information.):  



Error (Washington Times, Nicholas Kralev, 3/6/08): Mr. [Mahmoud] Abbas suspended talks with Israel over the weekend because of its military offensive against Hamas in Gaza in response to the rocket attacks. More than 120 civilians have died, including women and children

Correction (3/7/08): The Washington Times incorrectly reported yesterday the number of Palestinian civilians killed by Israeli military action in the Gaza Strip. Of more than 120 people killed during Israeli incursions into Gaza, the Israeli military estimates that about 10 percent were civilians. The Israeli human rights group B'Tselem said earlier this week that about half of the Palestinians killed in Gaza were noncombatants.



Error (New York Times, photo caption, 2/7/08): Bat El Ifrah, 10, removed articles on Wednesday from her home in Sderot, Israel, as her family prepared to flee...Two children on a playground near the Gaza border were also wounded in the attack, which was in retaliation for an Israeli airstrike in southern Gaza that killed seven Hamas policemen. [emphasis added]

Correction (Corrections: For the Record, 2/11/08): A caption on Thursday with a photograph of a home in Israel hit by a Palestinian rocket described the events surrounding the attack imprecisely. While the rocket attack followed an Israeli airstrike in southern Gaza, it was not known whether it was in fact in retaliation for the airstrike.



Error (AP, Aron Heller, 6/25/06): Abu Samhadana's death set off a chain of intensified hostilities that have included dozens of Palestinian rocket attacks on southern Israel ...

Correction (Updated Story, 6/25/06): One of those leaders, PRC leader Jamal Abu Samhadana, was killed in an Israeli air strike two weeks ago, shortly after accepting a senior security position in the Hamas-led government, part of a rapidly escalating round of rocket barrages and counterstrikes.

Fact: Palestinian rocket attacks from Gaza preceded—and prompted—Israel's targeted killing of Abu Samhadana.



Error (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Cox News article by Margaret Coker, 3/14/06): Israeli Gen. Yair Naveh said the assault on the prison was a move to bring terrorists to justice. The men are to be put on trial in Israel. He denied any link between the raid and the international team's action.

Correction (3/24/06): A March 15 front page story about an Israeli incursion misstated the country's position on why troops raided a Palestinian prison in Jericho to apprehend militants being held there. In paraphrasing the comments of Israeli Gen. Yair Naveh, the article suggested that there was no link between Israel's raid and the earlier withdrawal from the prison of U.S. and British observers. In fact, Naveh and other Israeli officials said that the departure of the observers was the reason the military operation was launched.



Error (Providence Journal, 8/21/05): ... total Palestinian civilians killed by these settlers is now over 400 in just the past four years.

Correction (11/1/05): In his Aug. 21 column, "Illegal occupation of Palestine," Mazin Qumsiyeh misstated the number of Palestinian civilians killed by Israeli settlers in the past four years. The figure is not 400 in the four years ending in August, as asserted by Mr. Qumsiyeh. According to the Israeli human-rights group B'tselem, only 22 Palestinian civilians were killed by Israeli settlers in that period. Perhaps more significantly, according to the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group, only 27 Palestinians were killed by Israeli settlers between Sept. 28, 2000, and July 31, 2005.



Error (Philadelphia Inquirer, Carol Rosenberg, 11/11/04): He shared the 1994 Nobel Peace Prize ... a prize Israel later came to view as soaked in blood after two violent Palestinian uprisings .... at the end of his life, Mr. Arafat was once again seen in wide portions of the West as an exremist cast as an obstacle to coexistence between 4.4 million Arabs and 4.7 million Jews who live in the land today controlled by Israel.

Correction (2/9/05): An obituary of Yasir Arafat published in The Inquirer on Nov. 11 gave an incorrect breakdown of the population of land controlled by Israel. The 2004 CIA Factbook indicates that more than 5.3 million Jews and more than 4.4 million non-Jews live in Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. The same obituary incorrectly said that Arafat received the 1994 Nobel Peace Prize after two Palestinian uprisings; the second uprising occurred after he had received the prize.

CAMERA: A number of errors in the Rosenberg story were left uncorrected. For details click here.



Error (Los Angeles Times, letter by Marc Springer of Chantilly, Va., 11/29/04): The numbers say it all, in more than four years of violence, some 900 Israelis have been killed, the majority soldiers, and more than 3,5000 Palestinians, the majority civilians. . . .

Correction (12/4/04): Mideast conflict – A letter Nov. 29 said soldiers were the majority of the 900 Israelis killed in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict since 2000. The majority have been civilians.



Error (Washington Post, Molly Moore and John Ward Anderson, 8/19/04): The speeches and internecine strife came as the Palestinian intifada, or uprising, approaches its fifth anniversary.

Correction (8/25/04): An Aug. 19 article incorrectly said that the Palestinian uprising was approach its fifth anniversary. The uprising began in September 200 and is nearing its fourth anniversary.



Error (San Francisco Chronicle, Washington Post article by John Ward Anderson, 7/12/04): Sunday’s bombing near a bus stop in central Tel Aviv was the first Palestinian attack inside Israel since a March 14 double suicide bombing at the seaport of Ashdod that killed 10 people, and it was the first in Tel Aviv in more than 14 months.

Correction (7/16/04): A Washington Post story published Monday misstated the date and location of the most recent previous Palestinian attack inside Israel. A rocket attack on June 28 killed two Israelis in Sderot.



Error (Washington Post, 7/12/04): The blast was the first Palestinian attack inside Israel since a double-suicide bombing March 14 at the seaport of Ashdod that killed 12 people, including the two attackers.

Correction (7/14/04): An article July 12 on a bombing in Tel Aviv misstated the date of the most recent previous Palestinian attack on Israeli territory. A rocket attack on June 28 killed a boy and a man in Sderot.



Error (NPR, "Weekend Edition," Linda Gradstein, 5/2/04): An Israeli army spokesman said two Palestinians attacked an Israeli vehicle at the entrance to the Gush Katif block of Jewish settlements in Gaza, killing a mother and her children. . . . The army spokesman said the militants fired at the vehicle and used an explosive device.

Correction (5/9/04): In a newscast last Sunday about the killing of an Israeli mother and her children by two Palestinian gunmen, we attributed the description of the gunmen as militants to an Israeli army spokesman. The spokesman’s statement used the word “terrorists,” not “militants.”



Error (Los Angeles Times, Mark Magnier and Ken Ellingwood, 3/23/04): Suicide bombings and other attacks have claimed nearly 950 Israeli lives since September 2000, while more than 2,750 Palestinians have died in clashes with Israeli troops.

Correction (4/9/04): Palestinian deaths – A March 23 article in Section A incorrectly stated that more than 2,750 Palestinians had died in clashes with Israeli troops during the Palestinian uprising. The correct figure is 2,445. The 2,750 figure represents the total number of Palestinians killed in all violence related to the 3 1/2-year uprising.



Error (NPR, "Morning Edition," Julie McCarthy, 3/16/04): It is the Jenin refugee camp, largely destroyed in Israel’s incursion into the West Bank in 2002.

Correction (3/29/04): A story about a Palestinian film festival reported that the Jenin refugee camp had been, quote, “largely destroyed” during an Israeli military action in 2002. But a United Nations report notes that while the center of the camp had been totally destroyed, the extent of the destruction for the camp as a whole was 10 percent.



Error (MSNBC.com, headline, 11/19/03): Israel kills gunman at Jordan border: At least five wounded when infiltrator opens fire

Correction (11/20/03): Jordanian wounds five tourists in Israel: Infiltrator shot dead at Israeli border crossing



Error (Reuters, Nidal al-Mughrabi, 10/16/03): The announcement of the arrests came as international pressure mounted on Palestinian authorities to crack down on militants after the bombing, the first to kill Americans during a three-year-old uprising against Israel for statehood.

Correction (10/16/03, subsequent stories): They announced the arrests as international pressure mounted on Palestinian authorities to crack down on militants after the bombing of an American diplomatic convoy. It was the first to kill Americans during a three-year-old Palestinian uprising against Israel for statehood.



Error (New York Times, James Bennet, 8/31/03): While Hamas has not successfully sent suicide bombers into Israel from the Gaza Strip, it has repeatedly fired crude rockets over Gaza’s fenced boundary. The attacks have not caused any injuries, however.

Correction (9/3/03): Because of an editing error, an article on Sunday about Israeli tank and missile attacks that left two Palestinian militants and an 8-year-old Palestinian girl dead misstated the toll taken by crude rockets fired by Hamas over Gaza's fenced boundary. While they have indeed caused no injuries in recent days, rockets have damaged several homes and factories over the last 18 months, leaving Israelis suffering from shrapnel wounds, broken limbs, smoke inhalation and shock.



Error (Chicago Tribune, HealthDay, 8/10/03): In a three-year round of terrorism that has left 472 dead [in Israel] and 3,846 injured, no studies had looked at the psychological impact of the violence until now, the authors asserted.

Correction (8/17/03): The Discoveries column in the Q section Aug. 10 misstated the number of terrorism casualties in Israel over the last three years. The Israel Defense Forces Web site put the numbers at 820 dead and 5,640 injured after an update Thursday.



Error (NPR, Craig Windham, 7/21/03): A Palestinian militant was killed over night in a bomb attack on a military vehicle near the West Bank city of Jenin, according to the Israeli army.

Correction (8/13/03): We want to correct one story from a few weeks ago. In a broadcast on July 21st, we said that a Palestinian militant had been killed in a bomb attack on an Israeli military vehicle and we attributed this statement to the Israeli army. The official army statement actually used the word terrorist, not militant.



Error (HealthDay, Amanda Gardner, 8/5/03): Since then [September 2000], [Palestinian] knife and gun attacks, drive-by shootings and suicide bombings resulted in 472 [Israeli] dead (318 of them civilians) and 3,847 injured (2,708 of them civilians).

Correction (8/12/03): Between then [September 2000] and April 30, 2002, the time frame of their study, the authors say that knife and gun attacks, drive-by shootings and suicide bombings resulted in 472 dead (318 of them civilians) and 3,847 injured (2,708 of them civilians).



Error (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Aaron Davis for Knight Ridder, 5/9/03): A missile attack yesterday killed a member of the militant Palestinian group Hamas and sent a fragile cease-fire up in smoke. Hamas leaders who just days before had tentatively agreed to halt suicide attacks against Israel for two years vowed quick retaliation and called for “open battle against the Zionists.”

Correction (6/10/03): An article published May 9 incorrectly stated that Hamas, the Islamic Resistance Movement, which has launched numerous suicide attacks against Israelis, had tentatively agreed to a two-year cease-fire. At that time, some Hamas commanders had made such a tentative agreement, but it had not been approved by the Hamas political leadership. Hamas has since rejected any cease-fire.



Error (San Jose Mercury News, Aaron Davis, 5/9/03): A missile attack Thursday killed a member of the militant Palestinian group Hamas and sent a fragile cease-fire up in smoke. Hamas leaders who just days before had tentatively agreed to halt suicide attacks against Israel for two years vowed quick retaliation and called for “open battle against the Zionists.”

Correction (5/28/03): A front-page article May 7 and an article May 9 in the World report incorrectly stated that Hamas, the Islamic Resistance Movement, which has launched numerous suicide attacks against Israelis, had agreed to a two-year cease-fire. There was no cease-fire. At that time, Hamas commanders in the Gaza Strip were in talks with the new Palestinian leadership and had reached a tentative agreement on a cease-fire, according to Hamas and Palestinian leadership sources. That accord, however, had not been approved by the political leadership of Hamas.



Error (ABC World News Tonight, Peter Jennings, 4/24/03): In the Israeli- occupied Palestinian territories today, a Palestinian suicide bomber killed an Israeli security guard and injured 14 other people. He blew himself up at a train station during the morning rush hour. This is the first suicide attack in nearly a month.

Correction (4/25/03): Speaking of the violence, we made a mistake last night on our broadcast. Yesterday's suicide attack by a Palestinian on Israelis took place in Israel itself, very near but not in the occupied territories, as we said.



Error (Boston Globe, Web headline, 3/6/03): Israeli troops kill 11 Palestinians in Gaza after Haifa suicide bombing

Correction (Posted later that day): Palestinians: Israeli troops raid Gaza refugee camp, at least 11 dead



Error (Boston Globe, photo caption, 5/9/02): An Israeli bomb squad robot dragged a wounded Palestinian man on a road in northern Israel yesterday.

Correction (Editor’s Note (5/10/02)): A caption that accompanied a photograph in yesterday’s World section should have said that the wounded Palestinian being dragged by an Israeli bomb squad robot was a suspected suicide bomber who was badly injured when explosives he was carrying blew up prematurely.



Error (Time Magazine, photo caption, 3/18/02): VOTING FOR MAYHEM: Israeli students at a demonstration in Jerusalem rally for more violence, raising paint-dipped hands.

Correction (Clarification 5/13/02): In our story “Streets Red With Blood,” on the increasing violence in the Middle East [World, March 18], we ran a photo of Israelis holding up their red-painted hands, accompanied by a caption that read, “Voting for Mayhem: Israeli students at a demonstration in Jerusalem rally for more violence, raising paint-dipped hands.” Instead, our caption should have more precisely explained the situation shown in the photograph: “Israeli right-wing student activists hold up their hands, painted in red as a symbol of bloodshed, at a demonstration supporting the cancellation of chief Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat’s lecture at the Hebrew University on Mount Scopus in Jerusalem.”



Error (Boston Metro, 8/13/01): Israel and Palestine continue to train teens for battle as violence in the Middle East escalates.

Correction (Correction 8/14/01): Due to an editing error, an Aug. 13 page-one story on a Palestinian camp where teenagers are trained for war inaccurately suggested that Israel is likewise training teenagers for acts of terrorism. This is not the case and Metro regrets the error.



Error (New York Times, William Orme, 7/12/01): Though Palestinians have made no fatal attacks on Israelis in the last several days, Mr. Peres said he did not believe the Palestinians were yet making the requisite ‘100 percent effort’ to control violence.

Correction (7/14/01): An article on Thursday about Foreign Minister Shimon Peres’s views on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict misstated the extent of recent violence by Palestinians. There had in fact been a fatal attack by Palestinians on an Israeli in the previous several days; an Israeli officer died after a bomb exploded under his vehicle Sunday night.



Error (ABC World News Tonight, Peter Jennings, 7/11/01): The Israeli Army says it will investigate the deaths of two Palestinians who died after being held up at army checkpoints. One of the cases involved a woman in labor who was turned back on her way to the hospital. Her newborn baby died.

Correction (Correction 7/24/01): And one other note from the Middle East: A Palestinian family has confirmed to us that reports of a new-born baby who died because the mother was held up at an Israeli army checkpoint are not correct. The baby apparently suffered respiratory failure on route to the hospital.



Error (Boston Globe, editorial, 7/10/01): Israeli mines are planted in areas where Palestinian civilians are trying to live their lives.

Correction (Correction 8/16/01): An editorial July 10 implied that, in the current Middle East conflict, Israel is placing mines in areas where Palestinians live. This claim is not substantiated.



Error (Boston Globe, Anne E. Kornblut, 6/27/01): “One must understand that if last week we had five dead, it’s like the United States, Mr. President, having 250 killed, or maybe even 30 people killed by terror, ” Sharon said in a joint photo session with Bush before their meeting at the White House.

Correction (6/28/01): Because of a typographical error, a Page 1 story yesterday on the meeting between President Bush and Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon misquoted one number in a statement by Sharon. The correct quote reads: “One must understand that if last week we had five dead, it's like the United States, Mr. President, having 250 killed, or maybe even 300 people killed by terror.”