Tuesday, February 20, 2018
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Corrected

Land

Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 10/3/15): The United Nations Security Council condemned Israel's annexation of Golan, and most of the world officially considers the territory illegally occupied, just like the West Bank.

Correction (10/14/15): The United Nations Security Council condemned Israel's annexation of Golan, and most of the world officially considers the territory occupied and the settlements there illegal, just like the West Bank …

 
An earlier version of this article referred incorrectly to the Golan Heights. While most of the world officially considers it to be occupied, and the settlements there illegal, there is no consensus that the occupation itself is illegal. The same error appeared in an earlier version of a caption with the accompanying slide show.



Error (i24 News, headline, 9/2/14): UN: Israeli plan to annex W. Bank land "illegal"

 
Europe, US blast plan; move to annex hectares taken in response to killing of 3 Israeli youths


Correction (9/7/14): UN: Israeli plan to expropriate W. Bank land 'illegal'
 
Europe, US blast plan; move to expropriate 400 hectares is response to killing of three Israeli youths



Error (Reuters, 8/12/08): Under the proposal, Israel would return to the Palestinians some 92.7 percent of the occupied West Bank, plus all of the Gaza Strip, according to Western and Palestinian officials briefed on the negotiations.

Correction (Updated story): Under the proposal, Israel would give to the Palestinians some 92.7 percent of the occupied West Bank, plus all of the Gaza Strip, according to Western and Palestinian officials briefed on the negotiations.



Error (Philadelphia Inquirer, letter by Robert G. Draper of Mickleton, NJ, 10/16/07): When the state of Israel was formed, there were tens of thousand of indigenous Palestinian Arabs living within the borders of this Jewish State. The laws of Israel declared that only Jews had the right to own land, thus depriving these Arabs of land ownership.

Correction (10/18/07): A letter on the Oct. 16 Editorial Page misleadingly stated the case regarding the right of Arab Israelis to own land in Israel. Arab Israelis may own land, but there is not much to own: Only about 6.5 percent of the land in Israel is privately owned (some by Arab Israelis). Of the rest, almost 80 percent is owned by the governmental agency called the Israel Land Administration. ILA land is not sold but leased; by law, it is available to be leased by all Israelis, whether Jewish, Arab or other. About 13 percent is owned by the Jewish National Fund. In September an Israeli high court ruled that the JNF must allow non-Jews to buy its land.

Fact: The correction failed to note that roughly half of the private land is owned by Arab Israelis, who constitute just 20 percent of the population.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Peter Wallsten and Tyler Marshall, 4/11/05): For Sharon too, the domestic stakes are high. By asserting Israelís right to expand Maale Adumim, Sharon is underscoring his stated goal of giving up Gaza while consolidating Israelís grip on major settlements in the West Bank, an area of greater importance to most Israelis, analysts said. Both territories were annexed in the 1967 war.

Correction (4/13/05): Texas summit — An article in Mondayís Section A about Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharonís meeting with President Bush said Israel annexed the Gaza Strip and West Bank in 1967. In fact, the territories were captured and occupied by Israel but not formally annexed, except for East Jerusalem and some adjacent West Bank land.



Error (Associated Press, 5/21/97): Arabs who live outside Israel cannot own land anywhere in the Jewish state even if it was once their property.

Correction (06/5/97): The Associated Press erroneously reported on May 21 that Arabs who live outside Israel cannot own land any-where in the Jewish state even if it was once their property. Israel does allow foreigners, including Arabs, to purchase private land in Israel for building purposes. Private land accounts for 6.5 percent of the total land in Israel.