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Corrected

Political Leaders

Error (Reuters, 11/21/17): A source familiar with the matter said that the office remained open and that Arab television channels had taken footage of the Palestinian ambassador entering the building this week.

Correction (11/29/17): A source familiar with the matter said that the office remained open and that Arab television channels had taken footage of its chief representative entering the building this week.

 
(Corrects title of PLO office’s chief representative in paragraph 11, in this Nov. 21 story)



Error (Haaretz, Bradley Burston, Op-Ed, 8/17/15): Apartheid means Likud lawmaker and former Shin Bet chief Avi Dichter calling Sunday for separate, segregated roads and highways for Jews and Arabs in the West Bank.

Correction (8/23/15): Apartheid means Likud lawmaker and former Shin Bet chief Avi Dichter calling Sunday for separate, segregated roads and highways for Israelis and Palestinians in the West Bank. . . . 

This article was amended on August 23 to correct comments by Avi Dichter, who called for separate roads in the West Bank for Israelis and Palestinians, rather than Jews and Arabs, as originally reported.



Error (Haaretz, headline, 10/19/14): Abbas threatens legal action to stop settlers from attacking Al-Aqsa

Correction (Online as of 10/26/14): Abbas threatens legal action to 'stop settlers from attacking Al-Aqsa'



Error (Washington Post blog, Jackson Diehl, 11/8/11): Early on [Netanyahu] announced his acceptance of Palestinian statehood, something he has never done; he responded to Obama's misguided demand for a freeze on Israeli settlements in the West Bank and Jerusalem by imposing a six-month moratorium. . .

 
For five of the six months of the Israeli settlement moratorium he refused Obama’s appeals to begin negotiations . . .


Correction (Posted as of 11/10): The length of the settlement freeze was in fact ten months, not six months.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Op-Ed by Rashid Khalidi, 6/17/03): While the media have remained obsessively focused on Hamas, there has been little coverage of Israeli hard-liners like Lt. Gen. Moshe Yaalon, the army's chief of staff who has publicly expressed his bitterness at the prospect of military operations in the occupied territories being halted if the "road map" for Middle East peace is implemented, and who has talked of rubbing in the fact that the Palestinians are "a defeated people." Officials like Yaalon are an obstacle to peace.

Correction (8/26/09): Hamas-Israel negotiations: An Op-Ed article titled "Can Hamas Cut a Deal for Peace?," which was published on June 17, 2003, paraphrased and partially quoted former Israeli army Chief of Staff Lt. Gen. Moshe Yaalon as having "talked of rubbing in the fact that the Palestinians are 'a defeated people.' " The Times was recently made aware of questions regarding the source and accuracy of this material. The Times has been unable to verify that Yaalon expressed the thought or used the quoted words. The quote and the paraphrase should not have been used.



Error (Time Magazine, Tim McGirk, 2/2/09): With land for peace discredited, the Israeli public turned to deterrence, using the strongest army in the region to crush opponents in the hope that one day, in the words of former army chief Moshe Ya'alon, "it will be seared deep in to the consciousness of Palestinians that they are a defeated people."

Correction (8/17/09): In "Lonesome Doves," about Israeli West Bank settlers, we quoted a former Israel Defense Forces chief of staff, Moshe Ya'alon, as saying, "It will be seared deep into the consciousness of Palestinians that they are a defeated people" [Feb. 2]. Though this quotation has been used widely over the years, the original source cannot be found, so TIME should not have used it.



Error (BBC Web site, 7/29/09): Haj Amin al-Husseini was a Palestinian nationalist leader who led violent campaigns against Jewish immigrants ...

Correction (Updated story, 8/4/09): Haj Amin al-Husseini was a Palestinian nationalist leader who led violent campaigns against Jews ...



Error (Charlston Gazette, Op-Ed by Eva Knapp, 4/12/09): A 2008 study by the Red Cross ... shows half of Gazan children under the age of 12 have lost their "will to live." ...

In 2002, then Israeli Defense Forces chief of staff said, "The Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people."

Correction (7/19/09): An April 12 commentary "America must stop blessing killings of Palestinians" by Eva Knapp contained an unverified quotation. Moshe Yaalon, a former Israeli Defense Forces chief of staff, was quoted as saying that "the Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people." Although cited often, the quote does not appear in the Israeli newspaper interview where it is usually attributed and should not have appeared in the Sunday Gazette-Mail.

The same commentary also attributes to an unpublished 2008 Red Cross study the conclusion that "half of Gazan children under the age of 12 have lost their 'will to live.'" A news account of that study by the Independent includes no such statement.



Error (Chicago Tribune, Op-Ed by Gary Fields, 2/22/04): More than a physical barrier imposed by the powerful upon the region's stateless and dispossessed, the wall expresses a collective psychology of conquest articulated most succinctly by one of its leading proponents, Moshe Yaalon, the Israeli army chief of staff.

He insists that "the Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people."

Correction (3/6/09): In a Perspective piece by Gary Fields, professor of communications at the University of California, San Diego, that ran in Feb. 22, 2004, editions of the Chicago Tribune, an unverified quote was used and attributed to the Israeli army's chief of staff, Moshe Yaalon. The op-ed quoted Yaalon as saying that "the Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people." While cited frequently over the years, this quote does not appear in the Israeli newspaper article to which it has been attributed, and the writer of that article said Yaalon did not say this. Fields could not confirm the origin of the quote. A spokesman for Yaalon said Thursday that Yaalon was misquoted and did not say the sentence attributed to him. Since the exact origin of the quotation has not been found and verified, it should not have been used in the Tribune.



Error (New York Times, Op-Ed by Rashid Khalidi, 1/8/09): This war on the people of Gaza isn't really about rockets. Nor is it about ''restoring Israel's deterrence,'' as the Israeli press might have you believe. Far more revealing are the words of Moshe Yaalon, then the Israeli Defense Forces chief of staff, in 2002: ''The Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people.''

Correction (Editors Note, 1/30/09): An Op-Ed article on Jan. 8, on misperceptions of Gaza, included an unverified quotation. A former Israeli Defense Forces chief of staff, Moshe Yaalon, was quoted as saying in 2002 that “the Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people.” This quotation, while cited widely, does not appear in the Israeli newspaper interview to which it is usually attributed. Its original source has not been found, and thus it should not have appeared in the article.



Error (Washington Post, photo caption, 3/28/06): Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni, right, makes a last pitch for her Likud Party in Jerusalem's Mahane Yehuda market

Correction (3/30/06): In one edition March 28, Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni was incorrectly identified in a photo caption as a member of the Likud Party. She is a member of Kadima.



Error (New York Times, Serge Schmemann, 8/15/02): Mr. Barghouti was first arrested and deported by the Israelis at the age of 16, but he returned to become president of the student body at Birzeit University, a hotbed of Palestinian nationalism in the West Bank. That led to another deportation, from which he returned in 1993. . .

Correction (9/17/02 ): An article on June 14 about potential successors to Yasir Arafat and one on Aug. 15 about the indictment of Marwan Barghouti, a Palestinian leader who is being tried by Israel on murder charges, misstated the history of his arrests and deportation. He was first arrested in 1978 at the age of 19, not 16. He was deported once, in 1987, not twice, and returned to the West Bank in 1994, not 1993. (A reader reported the errors by e-mail on Sept. 2; this correction was delayed for fact checking.)



Error (New York Times, Serge Schmemann, 7/14/02): They [Palestinians] voted for Yasir Arafat in 1997 because he was their national symbol. . .

Correction (7/21/02): A brief article last Sunday introducing a photo essay about Palestinians and their views about the United States and reform in the Palestinian Authority misstated the date Yasir Arafat was elected as the Palestinians’ president. It was 1996, not 1997.



Error (New York Times, James Bennet and John Kifner, 6/14/02): He [Marwan Barghouti] logged six years in Israel prisons, even before his recent arrest, having first been arrested by Israel at 16. He was deported in 1978. He returned five years later.

Correction (9/17/02): An article on June 14 about potential successors to Yasir Arafat and one on Aug. 15 about the indictment of Marwan Barghouti, a Palestinian leader who is being tried by Israel on murder charges, misstated the history of his arrests and deportation. He was first arrested in 1978 at the age of 19, not 16. He was deported once, in 1987, not twice, and returned to the West Bank in 1994, not 1993. (A reader reported the errors by e-mail on Sept. 2; this correction was delayed for fact checking.)