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Corrected

U.S. Policy

Error (Times of Israel, 2/12/18): Getting US backing for such a move would be a major shift in policy for the Americans, who have long considered the settlements illegal under international law.

Correction (2/12/18): Getting US backing for such a move would be a major shift in policy for the Americans, who have long considered the settlements an impediment to peace, while most of the international community considers them illegal under international law.



Error (Reuters, 11/21/17): A source familiar with the matter said that the office remained open and that Arab television channels had taken footage of the Palestinian ambassador entering the building this week.

Correction (11/29/17): A source familiar with the matter said that the office remained open and that Arab television channels had taken footage of its chief representative entering the building this week.

 
(Corrects title of PLO office’s chief representative in paragraph 11, in this Nov. 21 story)



Error (Los Angeles Times, Noga Tarnopolsky, 11/18/17): Reached in Washington, Palestinian Authority Ambassador to the United States Husam Zomlot said, “I have no comment. No comment at all.”

Correction (11/21/17): Husam Zomlot, identified in this article as the Palestinian Authority ambassador, is the chief representative of the Palestinian delegation to the U.S.



Error (Reuters, photo captions, 9/24/17): Israelis from Kurdish origin take part in a rally in support of the Kurdish referendum outside the American embassy in Jerusalem September 24, 2017.

Correction (9/25/17): Israelis from Kurdish origin take part in a rally in support of the Kurdish referendum outside the American consulate in Jerusalem September 24, 2017.



Error (New York Times editorial, 3/9/17): [The United States] has consistently held that settlement building in the occupied territories is illegal

Correction (3/10/17): An earlier version of this editorial incorrectly stated the United States’ position on settlement building in the occupied territories. It has been highly critical of the activity, but has not consistent held it to be illegal.



Error (Times of Israel, 12/22/16): The United Nations, as well as the US and most of the international community, maintains that settlements are illegal.

Correction (12/22/16): The United Nations and most of the international community maintain that settlements are illegal. … The US considers them illegitimate and an impediment to peace.



Error (ABC News online, Elizabeth McLaughlin, 12/17/16): International law, the United Nations and the United States consider Jewish settlements illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (12/19/16): Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the United States considers Israeli settlements illegal. The United States believes settlements are an impediment to a two-state solution, but has only rejected some as illegal under Israeli law, according to the U.S. State Department.



Error (Gazette (Montreal), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (National Post (Canada), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Ottawa Citizen, AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (London Free Press (Ontario), AP, 11/17/23): Avigdor Lieberman comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Leader-Post (Regina), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Windsor Star (Ontario), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Calgary Herald, AP, 11/17/16): The comments by Avigdor Lieberman, pictured, came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Star-Phoenix (Saskatoon), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.



Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (New York Times online, AP, 11/16/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/21/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate," ''corrosive to the cause of peace" and "raise serious questions about Israel's ultimate commitment to a peaceful negotiated settlement with the Palestinians." Most of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Edmonton Journal, AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. views as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlements policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlements construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Los Angeles Times online, AP, 11/16/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/21/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate," ''corrosive to the cause of peace" and "raise serious questions about Israel's ultimate commitment to a peaceful negotiated settlement with the Palestinians." Most of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Vancouver Sun, AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.

Error (ABC News online, AP, 11/16/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/21/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate," ''corrosive to the cause of peace" and "raise serious questions about Israel's ultimate commitment to a peaceful negotiated settlement with the Palestinians." Most of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (AP, Tia Goldenberg, 11/16/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/21/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate," "corrosive to the cause of peace" and "raise serious questions about Israel's ultimate commitment to a peaceful negotiated settlement with the Palestinians." Most of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Nicholas Goldberg, book review, 9/2/16): In many circles, you're more likely to hear about Israel's settlements, intransigence and its nearly 50-year-long occupation of the West Bank and Gaza than you are about its pluck or ingenuity.

Correction (9/24/16): "Zionism" Book Review: A review of the book "Zionism" in the Sept. 4 Arts & Books section referred to Israel's "nearly 50-year-long occupation of the West Bank and Gaza." The United Nations, Human Rights Watch and the International Committee of the Red Cross, among others, consider Gaza part of the occupied Palestinian territories; Israel, which withdrew from the region in 2005, and some other scholars reject this characterization.



Error (Guardian, Harriet Sherwood and Dan Roberts, 3/2/14): …the failure of an Aipac-supported effort to pass legislation blocking Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran has led to a reassessment of the fabled ability of its lobbyists to wield a veto over US policy when it comes to matters of Israeli security.

Correction: But the failure of Aipac to garner enough support in the Senate to oppose the Obama administration over its  nuclear deal with Iran has led to a reassessment of the fabled ability of its lobbyists to wield a veto over US policy when it comes to matters of Israeli security.



Error (ABC News Web site, Abby D. Phillip, 10/22/12): Obama's relationship with Netanyahu has been rocked by several public strains in the past four years, including disagreements about Israel's expansion of settlements in the Gaza Strip.

Correction (Posted as of 11/4/12): Obama's relationship with Netanyahu has been rocked by several public strains in the past four years, including disagreements about Israel's expansion of settlements in the West Bank.



Error (New York Times, Helene Cooper, 3/5/12): Mr. Obama, who has often lamented the United States invasion of Iraq in 2003, made reference to European and American intelligence assessments that have found no evidence that Iran has decided to pursue a nuclear weapon

Correction (3/13/12): Because of an editing error, an article on March 5 about President Obama’s speech to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee referred incorrectly to his comments about intelligence assessments of Iran’s ability to produce a nuclear weapon. Mr. Obama said, “The United States and Israel both assess that Iran does not yet have a nuclear weapon, and we are exceedingly vigilant in monitoring their program.” His speech did not mention some European intelligence reports that have said there is no evidence that Iran has made a final decision to pursue a nuclear weapon.



Error (NPR, "All Things Considered," headline, 8/5/10): "U.S. Urges Israelis, Palestinians To Begin Direct Talks"

Correction (Corrected headline, 8/18/10): "U.S. Pushes Palestinians On Direct Talks With Israelis"



Error (New York Times, Helene Cooper, news analysis, 11/29/07): Mr. Bush's speech ... was notable in that he explicitly took on only one of the core issues, the fate of Palestinian refugees, and, on that issue, sided with Israel.

Correction (12/14/07): A news analysis article on Nov. 29 about the diplomatic style of Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, including her handling of the Middle East, referred incorrectly to President Bush’s position on the fate of Palestinian refugees in his remarks on Nov. 27 at the Middle East peace conference in Annapolis, Md. While Mr. Bush called Israel “a homeland for the Jewish people,” this was an implicit support for Israel’s view that Palestinians should not be guaranteed a right of return to their former homes inside Israel. Mr. Bush did not “explicitly” take on that issue and side with Israel.



Error (New London Day, Mazin Qumsiyeh op-ed, 10/8/05): Israel with 0.1 percent of the world population gets 30 percent of U.S. foreign aid.

Correction (11/11/05): Mazin Qumsiyeh's Oct. 8 column said that Israel gets 30 percent of U.S. foreign aid. In fact, Israel receives 12.6 percent of America's foreign aid budget.



Error (CNN, Lou Dobbs Tonight, 7/11/05): The resettlement aid, if this is approved, would be the largest supplemental assistance to Israel since 1992, when Congress approved $3 billion to pay for damage from errant missiles during the first Gulf War.

Correction (8/18/05): On July 11th, we reported on Israel's request for U.S. funds to help pay for the relocation of Israeli settlers from Gaza. Lisa Sylvester reported that Israel received $3 billion in 1991 for costs related to errant Patriot missiles during the first Gulf War. The actual amount of emergency supplemental assistance Israel received from the United States in 1991 was $650 million.



Error (Reuters, Dan Williams, 7/11/05): The Gaza plan funding could be the biggest U.S. aid package to Israel since 1992, when Washington paid $3 billion to make up for damage sustained from Iraqi missile salvoes in the Gulf war.

Correction (Updated story): The Gaza plan funding could be the biggest U.S. aid package to Israel since 1992, when Washington paid $3 billion, including some $650 million in extra funding to make up for damage sustained from Iraqi missile salvoes in the Gulf war.



Error (Washington Times, 7/12/05): It would be the largest single aid request from Israel since 1992, when the United States provided some $3 billion to compensate Israel for damage caused by Saddam Hussein's missiles during the 1991 Persian Gulf War.

Correction (7/23/05): Due to erroneous information supplied by Reuters news agency, a story in the July 12 editions incorrectly reported the amount of supplemental aid Israel received from Washington to compensate for damage from missile attacks from Iraq during the 1991 Persian Gulf War. The correct figure was $650 million.



Error (New York Times, Elisabeth Bumiller, 5/27/05): In a gesture to Palestinians, Mr. Bush used the news conference to restate a longstanding policy outlining what the United States expected of Israel. He said that included no expansion of Jewish settlements in the West Bank and the area around Jerusalem, a halt to construction of a barrier that would intrude into Palestinian territory, the removal of Israeli troops from the West Bank and an easing of checkpoints and roadblocks that disrupt life in the West Bank.

Correction (5/30/05): An article on Friday about President Bush’s meeting in Washington on Thursday with Mahmoud Abbas, the Palestinian president, paraphrased incorrectly from Mr. Bush’s remarks at a news conference regarding the barrier that Israel is building in the West Bank. He said the route should take into account the barrier’s impact on Palestinians not engaged in terrorist activities. He did not call for a halt to construction of a barrier that would intrude into Palestinian territory.



Error (New York Times, Steven R. Weisman, 11/26/2003): The Bush administration, in a rare rebuke to Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, has decided to rescind $289.5 mllion in American-backed loan guarantees for Israel as a punishment for illegal construction activities in the West Bank, the Israeli Embassy announced Tuesday.

Correction (12/3/2003): An article last Wednesday about the decision by the Bush administration to cancel $289.5 million in American-backed loan guarantees for Israel referred incorrectly to West Bank construction activities that prompted it. Although federal law requires revoking loan guarantees to penalize certain construction deemed contrary to American policy, the United States does not define the activities as illegal.



Error (New York Times, Christopher Marquis, 10/16/03): Mr. Powell said he spoke with Israel's foreign minister, Silvan Shalom, and with Mr. Qurei on Wednesday. He called on both sides to end terrorism, but, in particular, he warned the Palestinians that their aspirations for statehood could be set back by violence.

Correction (10/18/03): An article on Wednesday about President Bush's condemnation of the assault that killed three Americans in Gaza referred imprecisely to comments by Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, who called the Israeli foreign minister and the Palestinian prime minister to express outrage. While he said he “made clear to them, in the strongest possible terms, the need to move urgently to end terrorism,” he did not call on “both” sides to end terrorism or otherwise suggest that Israel was supporting terrorist activities.



Error (New York Times on the web, David Stout, 6/24/02): [Mr. Bush] called on Israel to stop building settlements in Gaza and the West Bank and eventually pull back to the boundaries it held before its triumph in the 1967 war.

Correction (6/24/02): Ultimately, the president suggested, Israel should withdraw from much of the land occupied since 1967.



Error (New York Times on the web, headline, 6/24/02): Israel Asked to Halt Settlements and Pull Back Troops

Correction (6/24/02): Bush Demands Arafat’s Ouster Before U.S. Backs a New State; A New Condition for Palestinians Is Set by Bush



Error (AP, Susan Sevareid, 6/24/02): In his speech, Bush demanded Israel withdraw to positions it held on the West Bank two years ago and to stop building homes for Jews on the West Bank and Gaza. Ultimately, he said, Israel should agree to pull all the way back to the lines it held before the 1967 Mideast war.

Correction (6/24/02): As for the Israelis, he [Bush] said they should withdraw to positions they held on the West Bank two years ago and stop building homes for Jews on the West Bank and in Gaza. Ultimately, he said, Israel should end its occupation by negotiating a settlement based on U.N. resolutions calling on it to withdraw to “secure and recognized borders.”