Monday, June 26, 2017
  Home
RSS Feed
Facebook
Twitter
Search:
Media Analyses
Journalists
Middle East Issues
Christian Issues
Names In The News
CAMERA Authors
Headlines & Photos
Errors & Corrections
 Corrected
 Uncorrected
 Dismal Corrections
Film Reviews
CAMERA Publications
Film Suggestions
Be An Activist
Adopt A Library
History of CAMERA
About CAMERA
Join/Contribute
Contact CAMERA
Contact The Media
Privacy Policy
 
Corrected

Israeli Settlements

Error (NPR and WBUR, "Here and Now," Jeremy Hobson, 1/30/17): Israel's continuing push to build new settlements in the West Bank and east Jerusalem. Just within a few days of Trump being sworn in, Israel announced plans to build 2,500 new settlements.

Correction (Online, 1/31/17): In the audio atop this post, host Jeremy Hobson said the Israeli government was planning to build 2,500 new settlements. The government is planning to build 2,500 new housing units in existing settlements. We regret the error.



Error (Times of Israel, 12/22/16): The United Nations, as well as the US and most of the international community, maintains that settlements are illegal.

Correction (12/22/16): The United Nations and most of the international community maintain that settlements are illegal. … The US considers them illegitimate and an impediment to peace.



Error (ABC News.com, Elizabeth McLaughlin, 12/17/16): International law, the United Nations and the United States consider Jewish settlements illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (12/19/16): Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the United States considers Israeli settlements illegal. The United States believes settlements are an impediment to a two-state solution, but has only rejected some as illegal under Israeli law, according to the U.S. State Department.



Error (Gazette (Montreal), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (National Post (Canada), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Ottawa Citizen, AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (London Free Press (Ontario), AP, 11/17/23): Avigdor Lieberman comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Leader-Post (Regina), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Windsor Star (Ontario), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Calgary Herald, AP, 11/17/16): The comments by Avigdor Lieberman, pictured, came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Star-Phoenix (Saskatoon), AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.



Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (New York Times online, AP, 11/16/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/21/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate," ''corrosive to the cause of peace" and "raise serious questions about Israel's ultimate commitment to a peaceful negotiated settlement with the Palestinians." Most of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Edmonton Journal, AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. views as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlements policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlements construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Los Angeles Times online, AP, 11/16/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/21/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate," ''corrosive to the cause of peace" and "raise serious questions about Israel's ultimate commitment to a peaceful negotiated settlement with the Palestinians." Most of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Vancouver Sun, AP, 11/17/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/23/16): In a story Nov. 16 [sic] about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate." Much of the international community views the settlements as illegal.

Error (ABC News online, AP, 11/16/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/21/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate," ''corrosive to the cause of peace" and "raise serious questions about Israel's ultimate commitment to a peaceful negotiated settlement with the Palestinians." Most of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (AP, Tia Goldenberg, 11/16/16): Avigdor Lieberman's comments came as Israeli lawmakers are trying to gauge how Trump will address the issue of Israel's West Bank settlement construction, which the U.S. and much of the international community view as illegal and an obstacle to peace.

Correction (11/21/16): In a story Nov. 16 about Israel's settlement policy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the United States considers Israeli settlement construction in the West Bank to be illegal. While the United States opposes settlement construction, it does not take a position on its legality. Instead, it says that settlements are "illegitimate," "corrosive to the cause of peace" and "raise serious questions about Israel's ultimate commitment to a peaceful negotiated settlement with the Palestinians." Most of the international community views the settlements as illegal.



Error (Christian Science Monitor, Global News Blog, headline, 7/6/15): Why new Israeli settlements draw ire

Correction (7/11/16): Why new building in Israeli settlements draws ire

 
[Appended] This article was updated to clarify the nature and location of the plans for new building.



Error (Wall Street Journal, headline, Oct. 28, 2014): Israel Says It Plans to Build New Jerusalem Settlements

Correction (11/18/14): Israel announced plans in late October to build 1,000 new housing units in Jerusalem. A headline on an Oct. 28 World News article about the project incorrectly said Israel plans to build new settlements.



Error (Guardian, headline, 6/13/14): Israelis launch search around Hebron after three teenage settlers go missing

Correction (6/16/14): Israelis launch search around Hebron after three teenagers go missing



Error (Guardian, Peter Beaumont, 6/13/14): Israeli security forces have launched a mass search of the Hebron hills after three teenage settlers, one believed to be a US citizen, were reported missing amid fears that they may gave [sic] been kidnapped by a Palestinian group.

Correction (6/16/14): Israeli security forces have launched a mass search of the Hebron hills after three teenagers, one believed to be a US citizen, were reported missing amid fears they may gave [sic] been kidnapped by a Palestinian group.



Error (Independent, Jack Simpson, 6/15/14 ): The students -- two are reported to be 16 and the third 19 -- are said to have disappeared on their journey back to their Israeli settlement from school.

Correction (Online 6/16/14): The students -- two are said to be 16 and the third 19 -- are said to have disappeared close to the Alon Shvut settlement on their journey back home from school.



Error (Washington Post, Op-Ed, David Ignatius, 5/16/14): When Israel announced 700 new settlements in early April, before the April 29 deadline for the talks, "Poof, that was sort of the moment," Kerry told a Senate panel.

Correction (5/17/14): David Ignatius's May 16 Washington Forum column, "A Mideast peace process in tatters," incorrectly reported that Israel announced 700 new settlements in April. Israel announced 700 new settlement apartments last month.



Error (Haaretz, headline, 5/19/14): Lag Ba'omer in Hebron: Settlers torch Palestinian orchard

Correction (5/20/14): The headline of an article by Yair Ettinger and Amira Hass in yesterday's paper was incorrect. It should have read: "Lag Ba'Omer in Hebron: Settlers light bonfire in Palestinian orchard."



Error (The Economist, book review, 5/3/14): One of the most fanatical settlements, Kochav Yair, is named after [pre-state Lehi leader Avrahim "Yair" Stern].

Correction (5/8/14): In an earlier version of this article we mistakenly identified Kochav Yair as a fanatical settlement named after Stern. This was incorrect. Kochav Yair is neither a settlement nor fanatical; it is on the Israeli side of the "green line". This was changed on May 8th 2014.



Error (International New York Times, photo caption, 4/27/14): A Palestinian with a gas mask on Friday at an Israeli settlement near Nablus, the West Bank.

Correction (4/30/14): A front-page photo caption in Saturday-Sunday editions misidentified the location of a Palestinian protest over the Jewish settlement of Qadomem. The protest took place near Qadomem, not in it.



Error (Ha'aretz, Op-Ed, Moshe Arens, 12/2/13): [EU bureaucrats] have succeeded in imposing on Israel their demand that scientific cooperation of Israeli scientists with EU scientists, within the framework of the Horizon 2020 program, will be limited to those Israeli scientists who do not reside beyond the 1949 armistice lines or are not associated with institutions located there.

Correction (12/5/13): The article "Science in service of politicians" by Moshe Arens, which was published on Dec. 2, 2013, should have stated that funding limitations in the EU's Horizon 2020 initiative apply to research institutions. They do not apply to individual scientists residing beyond the 1949 armistice lines, as was mistakenly stated.



Error (Guardian, Op-Ed, Michael Brull, 11/26/13): Livni knows perfectly well why Israel builds settlements. In another candid moment, she explained that “the Israel policy is to take more and more land day after day and that at the end of the day we’ll say that it is impossible we already have the land and cannot create the state.”

Correction (11/26/13): This article was amended on 26 November 2013. An earlier version omitted the following words from the start of a quote from Tzipi Livni: "I understand the sentiments of the Palestinians when they see the settlements being built. The meaning from the Palestinian perspective is that . . . "



Error (International New York Times, Mark Landler and Jodi Rudoren, 11/6/13): An absence of progress on the core issues, an ill-timed Israeli plan to build 3,500 more settlements on the West Bank and East Jerusalem. . .

Correction (11/7/13): An article on Wednesday about American efforts to reinvigorate the Middle East peace negotiations stated incorrectly that Israel plans to build 3,500 additional settlements on the West Bank and in East Jerusalem. Israel does not plan more settlements, but it has recently advanced projects for that number of new housing units within existing settlements.



Error (Ha'aretz, Gili Cohen, 4/3/13): Every professional army officer who does not serve in a front-line unit must spend one week a year protecting these [illegal outpost] settlements.

Correction (4/5/13): An article by Gili Cohen ("IDF regularly deploys soldiers to guard one-quarter of illegal West Bank outposts," April 4), should have stated that every professional army officer who does not serve in a front-line unit must spend one week protecting vulnerable communities on both sides of the Green Line. The original version included a translation of the Hebrew term "yishuvim" as "settlements."



Error (ABC News Web site, Abby D. Phillip, 10/22/12): Obama's relationship with Netanyahu has been rocked by several public strains in the past four years, including disagreements about Israel's expansion of settlements in the Gaza Strip.

Correction (Posted as of 11/4/12): Obama's relationship with Netanyahu has been rocked by several public strains in the past four years, including disagreements about Israel's expansion of settlements in the West Bank.



Error (Guardian, Phoebe Greenwood, 7/23/12): As recently as 8 June, [Catherine Ashton] issued a statement deploring Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu's decision to build an additional 800 settlements in occupied territory -- compensation for the 17 Israeli families the country's high court had ordered to be removed from the Migron settlement.

Correction (Posted online as of 7/24/12): This article was amended on 24 July 2012. The original said Binyamin Netanyahu had decided to build an additional 800 settlements in occupied territory. This has been corrected to 800 homes.



Error (Washington Post blog, Jackson Diehl, 11/8/11): Early on [Netanyahu] announced his acceptance of Palestinian statehood, something he has never done; he responded to Obama's misguided demand for a freeze on Israeli settlements in the West Bank and Jerusalem by imposing a six-month moratorium. . .

 
For five of the six months of the Israeli settlement moratorium he refused Obama’s appeals to begin negotiations . . .


Correction (Posted as of 11/10): The length of the settlement freeze was in fact ten months, not six months.



Error (Yediot Achronot (in Hebrew), Asaf Gefen, Op-Ed, 9/23/11): Although it isn't clear if this [funding from the Ministry of the Development of the Negev and the Galil for a new cultural center in Kiryat Arba] is because Kiryat Arba is in the Negev or because the residents of the place have a practice of shooting their neighbors with a Galil. (CAMERA's translation. A Galil is an Israeli-made semi-automatic machine gun.)

Correction (10/14/11): Contrary to what may have been understood from a previous column, the residents of Kiryat Arba do not have the practice of shooting their Palestinian neighbors.



Error (Ha'aretz, Op-Ed, 10/3/11): It's a fact: From the moment Kaniuk learned of the judge's ruling on the eve of Rosh Hashanah until the news was reported in the newspapers, several outstanding Jews (in their own opinion), residents of the West Bank settlement of Anatot, managed to demonstrate how easily Judaism can be turned into a loaded pistol aimed at the goyim, when they went out, as is their custom, to enhance the joy of the holiday by engaging in a pogrom against Palestinians and the peace activists who came to their assistance.

Correction (10/7/11): In the article by Neri Livneh ("A new movement?" October 3), it was erroneously implied that residents of the Anatot settlement have participated in attacks against peace activists and Palestinians in the past.



Error (International Herald Tribune, Neil MacFarquhar, 9/19/11): They remain under occupation, the number of settlers in the West Bank has tripled to around 600,000, and they have far less freedom of movement in the territories ostensibly meant to become their state.

Correction (10/6/11): An article on Sept. 19 about the Palestinian application to join the United Nations misstated the number of Israeli settlers in the West Bank. There are 600,000 living on land in the West Bank and East Jerusalem captured in 1967, not in the West Bank alone.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Christopher Hawthorne, 2/2/11): "Decolonizing Architecture" is driven by a simple but provocative question: If and when Israel decides, or is compelled, to leave the occupied territories in the Gaza Strip and West Bank, what should returning Palestinians do with the buildings, roads and bridges the army and the settlers leave behind?

Correction (2/4/2011): "Decolonizing Architecture": A review of the exhibition "Decolonizing Architectue" in the Feb. 2 Calendar section implied that Israel continues to occupy the Gaza Strip. In fact, Israeli forces pulled out of the area in 2005.



Error (Ha'aretz, Akiva Eldar, 3/21/10): Twenty-one percent of settlers believe that all means must be employed in to [sic] resist the evacuation of most West Bank settlements, including the use of arms, according to a recent Hebrew University study.

Correction (9/7/10): A few months ago, it was reported here that a survey by the Hebrew University's Truman Institute shows that most settlers support the use of legal means to thwart a government decision to evacuate communities in the West Bank. I also reported that over a fifth of those surveyed "believe that all means must be employed in to resist the evacuation of most West Bank settlements, including the use of arms." Following a reader comment, it should be noted that the appendage, "including the use of arms" was not actually part of the question and was too broad an interpretation for it to be included in "all means."



Error (Washington Post, Howard Schneider, 6/26/09): The plans were set: boost the guard near Rachel's Tomb and other sites Israelis visit, guard against possible snipers shooting at the Jewish settlement of Gilo, put Palestinian intelligence agents on overtime to keep in touch with sources, and call in political party leaders to discourage incitement.

Correction (Washiington Post, 7/16/09): A June 26 A-section article referred to Gilo as a Jewish settlement. It is a Jewish neighborhood built on land captured in the 1967 Arab-Israeli War and annexed to Israel as part of Jerusalem's expanded municipal boundaries. The United Nations has not acknowledged the annexation.



Error (BBC Web site article, 1/28/08): Israel began tightening its blockade of the Gaza Strip after an increase in rocket attacks by militants targeting its settlements near the border. [emphasis added]

Correction (2/2008): Israel began tightening its blockade of the Gaza Strip after an increase in rocket attacks by militants targeting its communities near the border. [emphasis added]



Error (Boston Herald, Marie Szaniszlo, 12/25/05): After 38 years of occupying the Gaza Strip, Israel pulled out, evacuating some 8,000 Israeli settlers and destroying their homes so that Palestinians could not use them.

Correction (1/15/06): A year-end review article on Dec. 25 about the Israeli pullout from the Gaza Strip included an incomplete explanation of why the Israelis tore down the vacated homes left behind by Jewish settlers. Palestinian officials said they wanted the homes to be torn down as unsuitable for their housing needs. Additionally, some Israeli officials were concerned the Palestinian group Hamas would triumphally overrun the empty houses.

CAMERA: The Palestinian Authority called for the demolition of the homes so that they could be replaced with high-density apartments for Palestinians. See here for more details.



Error (Providence Journal, 8/21/05): ... total Palestinian civilians killed by these settlers is now over 400 in just the past four years.

Correction (11/1/05): In his Aug. 21 column, "Illegal occupation of Palestine," Mazin Qumsiyeh misstated the number of Palestinian civilians killed by Israeli settlers in the past four years. The figure is not 400 in the four years ending in August, as asserted by Mr. Qumsiyeh. According to the Israeli human-rights group B'tselem, only 22 Palestinian civilians were killed by Israeli settlers in that period. Perhaps more significantly, according to the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group, only 27 Palestinians were killed by Israeli settlers between Sept. 28, 2000, and July 31, 2005.



Error (American Journalism Review, Barbara Matusow, June/July 2004): To understand the particular tensions in Gaza, for example, and why Israel is contemplating a pullout, it’s necessary to know that this tiny strip of land is home to 1.2 million Palestinians, while 7,500 Israeli settlers occupy 25 percent of the land and control most of the water resources.

Correction (August/September 2004): In “Caught in the Crossfire” (June/July), Barbara Matusow wrote that Israeli settlers occupy 25 percent of the land in the Gaza Strip and control most of the water resources. According to the Institute of Applied Research in Jerusalem, the Palestinians control 95 percent of the water resources in Gaza. Estimates vary widely when it comes to control of the land, however. A June 2004 report on Gaza by the World Bank states that 15 to 20 percent of the land is occupied by settlements.



Error (Washington Post, John Ward Anderson, 7/23/04): A little more than 8,000 settlers occupy approximately 40 percent of the land in the Gaza Strip. . . .

Correction (7/28/04): A July 23 article misstated the amount of land in the Gaza Strip occupied by Jewish settlers. Although there is disagreement on the exact amount, estimates range from about 12 percent to about 15 percent. When Israeli military installations, roads and security zones are included, estimates range from about 15 percent to about 38 percent.



Error (Christian Science Monitor, David Clark Scott, 7/19/04): “We stopped at a little store in Efrat, another settler outpost, and he emerged with bottles of mineral water and orange juice,” says Ben.

Correction (7/19/04): Not an Outpost: In this column on July 9, under the title “Principles in Conflict,” we erroneously described a West Bank town where Ben and his Peace Now guide stopped for refreshments. Efrat is a large, well-established settlement under Israeli law.



Error (Boston Globe, Farah Stockman, 4/15/04): Since the 1967 war, when Israel captured Gaza and the West Bank, US policy has regarded settlements in those territories as illegal under international law.

Correction (5/5/04): Because of a reporting error, an April 15 Page One story on US policy on the Middle East incorrectly stated that since 1967 US government policy has regarded Israeli settlements in the West Bank and the Gaza strip as illegal under international law. The Carter administration held that settlements were illegal. Subsequent administrations, including the current Bush administration, have opposed settlement activity, but have taken no position on the legality of the settlements.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Sonni Efron, 12/13/03): Washington is pressuring Sharon to make good on the commitment made to Bush in Aqaba, Jordan, in the spring to begin dismantling Jewish settlements in the Palestinian territories, knowledgeable sources said.

Correction (12/17/03): Jewish settlements–An article in Saturday’s Section A about the Israeli foreign minister’s visit to Washington misstated a commitment Prime Minister Ariel Sharon made at a June summit in Aqaba, Jordan. Sharon agreed to dismantle some illegal outposts of Jewish settlements; he did not agree to begin dismantling settlements themselves.



Error (New York Times, Steven R. Weisman, 11/26/2003): The Bush administration, in a rare rebuke to Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, has decided to rescind $289.5 mllion in American-backed loan guarantees for Israel as a punishment for illegal construction activities in the West Bank, the Israeli Embassy announced Tuesday.

Correction (12/3/2003): An article last Wednesday about the decision by the Bush administration to cancel $289.5 million in American-backed loan guarantees for Israel referred incorrectly to West Bank construction activities that prompted it. Although federal law requires revoking loan guarantees to penalize certain construction deemed contrary to American policy, the United States does not define the activities as illegal.



Error (NPR, "Morning Edition," Julie McCarthy, 10/29/03): Not the outposts, but the settlements that now house some 225 million Israeli settlers in the occupied West Bank and Gaza.

Correction (11/4/03): First, a correction in an interview about Israel’s plan to extend services such as electricity to some West Bank settlements. NPR’s Julie McCarthy said that 250 million Israelis live in settlements. She meant to say 250,000.