Saturday, February 24, 2018
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Corrected

Israeli Arabs

Error (Haaretz, Alit Carp, Op-Ed, 1/30/18): I am not comparing the Holocaust to the Nakba, neither in scope nor intent, but we should remember that in Israel it is forbidden by law to mark the Nakba. . .

Correction (1/30/18): I am not comparing the Holocaust to the Nakba, neither in scope nor intent. However, should remember that Israel, too, via the offices of Culture Minister Miri Regev, is doing everything in its power to deny funding for organizations that nonetheless wish to commemorate the Nakba.

 
This article was amended on January 30th, 2018, to remove an incorrect reference to the illegality of commemorating the Nakba in Israel.



Error (Economist, 11/24/16): Arabic songs were banned from Israeli radio for several decades.

Correction (11/29/16): A previous version of this explainer asserted that Arabic songs were banned from Israeli radio. While there was no official ban, some radio stations did not play Arabic music. The text has been updated.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Kenneth Turan, movie review, 7/3/15): . . . "A Borrowed Identity" deals with the situation of the roughly 10% of the state of Israel population (1.617 million people, we are told) who are Palestinians.

Correction (7/18/15): Palestinian population: A July 3 review of the movie "A Borrowed Identity" said Palestinians constitute about 10% of Israel's population. The figure is closer to 20%, according to the Israeli Bureau of Statistics.

CAMERA: The Central Bureau of Statistics' figure of 20 percent refers to Arabs living in Israel. Some, but not all, of them consider themselves Palestinians.



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 3/16/15): Unlike Arabs in the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem, Palestinian citizens of Israel have full voting rights.

Correction (3/18/15): An article on Monday about a political awakening of Arabs in Israel this election year referred incorrectly to voting rights for Arabs in East Jerusalem. A small number — those who hold Israeli citizenship — are entitled to vote in Israeli elections; it is not the case that no Arabs in East Jerusalem can vote.



Error (USA Today, Kate Shuttleworth, 2/19/15): Even though the number of Arabs in high-tech jobs is increasing, they still only account for 1% of those employees despite making up 30% [emphasis added] of Israel’s population.

Correction (2/20/15): A previous version of this article provided the incorrect percentage of the Arab population in Israel. The nation's Arab residents make up about 21% of the population.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 12/9/14): Professor Jamal said the Arab city of Nazareth has twice the population but 5 percent of the land of its neighbor, predominantly Jewish Upper Nazareth. . .

Correction (12/18/14): An earlier version of this article misstated the size of the Arab city of Nazareth relative to a neighboring town, predominantly Jewish Upper Nazareth, using information from a Tel Aviv University political science professor. Nazareth has nearly twice the population but less than half the land of Upper Nazareth, not twice the population and 5 percent of the land.



Error (Haaretz, headline, 5/5/14): Netanyahu: Israel is home of one people -- the Jewish people

Correction (5/8/14): The headline of an article by Barak Ravid ("Netanyahu: Israel is home to one people -- Jewish," [sic] May 5), incorrectly translated the prime minister's comments at the weekly cabinet meeting. Netanyahu said that Israel "is the nation-state of one people -- the Jewish people," as the body of the article accurately reported.



Error (Independent, Robert Fisk, 4/25/14): Since Mr Netanyahu has been demanding that Mr Abbas accept -- even before the latter's renewed love affair with Hamas -- that Israel was a "Jewish state" (thus deleting its tens of thousands of Israeli Arab citizens), no "recognition of Israel" without its Jewish definition would be of any use to him.

Correction (Online as of 4/29/14): Since Mr Netanyahu has been demanding that Mr Abbas accept -- even before the latter's renewed love affair with Hamas -- that Israel was a "Jewish state" (thus deleting its million and more Israeli Arab citizens), no "recognition of Israel" without its Jewish definition would be of any use to him.



Error (Ha'aretz, Talila Nesher, 5/10/12): In January, the High Court of Justice upheld the controversial Nakba Law passed by the Knesset in March, which fines bodies who openly reject Israel as a Jewish state.

Correction (5/11/12): An article by Talila Nesher ("Tel Aviv University students to mark Nakba Day on campus," May 9) incorrectly stated which bodies are affected by the Nakba Law. The law applies to bodies that receive state funding and not as published.

CAMERA: In addition, the law does not allow for a fine. Rather, it enables the Finance Minister to withhold state funds budgeted to the body.



Error (Los Angeles Times Web site, headline, 4/30/12): Israeli-born Islamist [Sheik Raed Saleh] to resume his anti-discrimination campaign

Correction (4/30/12): Hero to Arab-Israelis Returns



Error (Washington Post, AP, 12/30/09): Israel's Supreme Court on Tuesday ordered the military to allow Palestinians to travel on the part of a major highway that runs through the West Bank, handing Palestinians their biggest victory yet against Israel's practice of reserving some roads for Jews.

Correction (1/28/10): A Dec. 30 A-section item from the Associated Press, about an Israeli Supreme Court ruling giving Palestinians access to a section of West Bank highway previously closed to them, incorrectly said that Israel reserves some roads for Jews. The country closes some roads to virtually all Palestinians, but they are open to all Israeli citizens and to other nationals, regardless of religious background.



Error (Boston Globe, AP article by Amy Tiebel, 12/30/09): Israel's Supreme Court ordered the military yesterday to allow Palestinians to travel on the part of a major highway that runs through the West Bank, handing Palestinians their biggest victory yet against Israel's practice of reserving some roads for Jews.

Correction (1/5/09): An Associated Press story on Dec. 30 incorrectly stated Israeli restrictions on road travel. Israel reserves some roads for the use of Israeli citizens.



Error (Wall Street Journal, Charles Levinson, 2/6/09): Ms. Livni said in December that if elected she would tell Israel's Arab citizens "your national aspirations lie elsewhere," comments widely interpreted as an endorsement of Mr. Lieberman's plan to transfer Israel's Arabs to Palestinian control.

Correction (2/27/09): Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni said she didn't support forcing Israel Arabs to be transferred to Palestinian control when she said in December that their "national aspirations lie elsewhere." A Feb. 6 World News article said the comment was widely interpreted as endorsing such a policy, but didn't include Ms. Livni's subsequent clarification.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Richard Boudreaux, 10/31/07): Unlike Israeli Arabs, who number 1.4 million and make up one-fifth of the country's population, Druze serve in the military.

Correction (11/3/07): Israeli army: An article in Wednesday's Section A about a raid on a Druze village in Israel said that Arabs did not serve in the Israeli army. Military service is not compulsory for Arab citizens of Israel, but they can enlist voluntarily. A small number of them do so.



Error (Ynetnew.com, Yossi Beilin Op-Ed, 10/15/07): All of the 250,000 Palestinians residing in Jerusalem continue to remain Israeli citizens (albeit without the right to vote in Israel's Knesset and without an Israeli passport, but with full social benefits such as health and education.) 

Correction (Online as of 10/25/07): All 250,000 Palestinians in Jerusalem are entitled to Israeli citizenship, but if they decline, they are automatically considered permanent residents (albeit without the right to vote in Israel's Knesset and without an Israeli passport, but with full social benefits such as health and education).

Fact: Israeli citizenship grants Jerusalem Arabs a vote in national elections and an Israeli passport.



Error (Christian Science Monitor, Aaron David Miller op-ed, 5/17/05): The status of Israeli Arabs, without access to military or national service, and constantly under suspicion as a potential fifth column, is indeed nation-dividing.

Correction (5/20/05): A May 17 Opinion page article, "Why the Gaza pullout matters" sugggest that Israeli Arabs cannot serve in Israel's army. In fact, they are not barred by law from doing so.

Error (Los Angeles Times, Aaron David Miller, 5/11/05): Without access to military or national service and constantly under suspicion as a potential fifth column, the status of Israeli Arabs is indeed nation-dividing.

Correction (5/19/05): Gaza Strip pullout – A May 11 Commentary article about Israel’s proposed withdrawal from the Gaza Strip said Israeli Arabs are “without access to military or national service.” In fact, although they cannot be drafted and most choose not to serve, Israeli Arabs can enlist in the Israeli armed forces.



Error (Los Angeles Times, George Bisharat, oped, 1/25/04): . . . they [Israeli Arabs] cannot serve in the armed forces.

Correction (2/1/04): Israeli Arabs — A Jan. 25 Opinion article by George Bisharat, “Right of Return” stated that Israeli citizens who are Palestinians cannot serve in the Israeli armed forces. In fact, although they cannot be drafted and most choose not to serve, Israeli Palestinians can enlist in the service.



Error (Boston Globe, letter headline, 9/19/03): Real Root of Palestinian Alienation Is Their Second-Class Status in Israel

Correction (9/20/03): Also, the letter [yesterday] from S.H. Grossman had a misleading headline. Grossman contended that the reason Israeli Arabs are alienated is not their second-class status in Israel but, possibly, “the destructive influence of the Palestinian movement.”



Error (Boston Globe, Patrick Healy, 1/29/03): With Sharon’s Likud party coasting to victory, several Palestinians living in Jerusalem–and barred from voting because of citizenship laws–said that the only assured result of yesterday’s election would be more bloodshed.

Correction (2/4/03): Clarification: A Jan. 29 story on the World pages about the Israeli elections was unclear on the voting rights of Palestinians living in Jerusalem. Palestinians living there can seek Israeli citizenship and, if they obtain it, can vote in Israeli elections. If they do not become citizens, they can still vote in municipal elections.