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Corrected

Lebanon

Error (New York Times, Laura Boushnak and Mona Boshnaq, 12/30/17): Throughout the Middle East, gay, lesbian and transgender people face formidable obstacles to living a life of openness and acceptance in conservative societies. …

 
If there is one exception, it has been Lebanon.


Correction (12/31/17): Throughout the Arab world, gay, lesbian and transgender people face formidable obstacles to living a life of openness and acceptance in conservative societies. …
 
If there is one exception, it has been Lebanon. …
 
An earlier version of this article misstated the exceptionality of Lebanon in the Middle East. While Lebanon is an exception in the Arab world, it is not an exception in the Middle East; in Israel, gay, bisexual and transgender people have widespread rights and freedoms.



Error (New York Times, subheadline, 12/30/17): Openly gay, lesbian and transgender people face persecution across the Middle East. The exception may be in Lebanon, which has slowly grown more tolerant thanks to the work of activists

Correction (12/31/17): Openly gay, lesbian and transgender people face persecution across the Arab world. The exception may be in Lebanon, which has slowly grown more tolerant thanks to the work of activists. …

 
An earlier version of this article misstated the exceptionality of Lebanon in the Middle East. While Lebanon is an exception in the Arab world, it is not an exception in the Middle East; in Israel, gay, bisexual and transgender people have widespread rights and freedoms.



Error (International Business Times, headline, 11/27/17): Lebanese Newspaper Claims to Reveal Gal Gadot's Alleged Alternate Identity as Mossad Agent

Correction (11/28/17): Lebanese Newspaper Apologizes For Using Gal Gadot Photo in Story About Mossad Agent

 
This story has been updated to reflect that Al Liwaa apologized for using Gal Gadot’s photo to illustrate a story about an alleged Mossad agent. 



Error (International Business Times, Lauren Dubois, 11/27/17): However, at least according to a Lebanese newspaper, Israeli actress Gal Gadot also has another secret identity—as a Mossad agent.

The paper, a daily known as Al Liwaa, published an image of Gadot on their front page Monday, claiming in an unsubstantiated report (via The Times of Israel), that she was actually Collette Vianfi, an agent from Israel’s international spy agency who was allegedly recruited to work with Lebanese actor and playwright Ziad Itani, who was arrested on Friday on charges of “collaborating” with Israel and gathering information about political figures.

Correction (11/28/17): However, at least the way a Lebanese newspaper portrayed her, Israeli actress Gal Gadot has another secret identity—as a Mossad agent.

The paper later apologized for misusing the photo and the implication that Gadot is an Israeli agent.

The paper, a daily known as Al Liwaa, published an image of Gadot on their front page Monday in a report (via The Times of Israel) about Collette Vianfi, an agent from Israel’s international spy agency who was allegedly recruited to work with Lebanese actor and playwright Ziad Itani, who was arrested on Friday on charges of “collaborating” with Israel and gathering information about political figures.

This story has been updated to reflect that Al Liwaa apologized for using Gal Gadot’s photo to illustrate a story about an alleged Mossad agent. 



Error (DPA/AP Images captions, 3/1/17): An underground room in the Galilee Medical Center in Naharija [sic], Israel, 1 March 2017. Injured Syrians wait for their nex [sic] treatment in the hospital which is partially under ground and bomb-proof due to the close-by Libyan border. Photo by Stefanie J'rkel/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

Correction (3/6/17): The border mentioned in the second sentence in the pictures sent to you on 03 March 2017 via FTP was wrongly identified as Libyan. The correct name of the border is Lebanese rpt. Lebanese. We will resend the picture with the correct version of the caption. We apologize for any inconvenience. With kind regards dpa-i desk. . .



Error (NPR, Alice Fordham, 10/2/14): And [in Shatila] they remember one of the worst atrocities of the war - a massacre of mostly Palestinian civilians by Christian militias helped by Israeli forces, in 1982.

Correction (Online, 10/6/14): In the audio of this report, it is said that Israeli forces "helped" Christian militias during the massacres of mostly Palestinian civilians at two Lebanese camps in 1982. An earlier Web version of this report said the same. The massacres were at the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps in Beirut, which at the time were surrounded by Israeli forces. A commission established by Israel's government later concluded that the massacres were "perpetrated" by the militias. The commission also concluded that Israel bore "indirect responsibility" because it allowed the militias to enter the camps "without consideration of the danger" and because "no energetic and immediate actions were taken to restrain" the militias or stop the massacres.



Error (New York Magazine, Caroline Bankoff, 1/11/14): In 1983, [Ariel Sharon] was forced to resign from his role as defense minister after he was found to be "indirectly responsible" for the massacres in Sabra and Shatila, two Palestinian refugee camps in West Beirut where hundreds of civilians were killed by Israel soldiers during Israel's invasion of Lebanon.

Correction (Online as of 1/20/14): .  . two Palestinian refugee camps in West Beirut where hundreds of civilians were killed by Lebanese Christian militia* during Israel's invasion of Lebanon.

 
(Correction appended to online article): This story originally said, incorrectly, that the civilians were killed by Israeli soldiers.
 


Error (McClatchy, Dion Nissenbaum, 7/20/08): Israeli planes, tanks and artillery batteries staged relentless attacks that killed more than 1,200 Lebanese civilians...

Correction (Online update, 7/28/08): Israeli planes, tanks and artillery batteries staged relentless attacks that killed more than 1,200 Lebanese citizens...

Fact: Because McClatchy only corrected the online version of story, the erroneous language remains in news databases.



Error (NPR, "All Things Considered," Michelle Norris, 8/14/07): The conflict erupted when Hezbollah launched a cross-border raid and captured two Israeli soldiers. Israeli warplanes unleashed waves of airstrikes against Lebanon and sent troops and tanks across the border. Hezbollah then retaliated by firing Katyusha rockets at Israeli cities and towns.

Correction (8/23/07): In a recent story we stated that last year's conflict between Israel and Hezbollah erupted when Hezbollah launched a cross border raid and captured two Israeli soldiers. We then said that Israel unleashed air strikes and sent troops and tanks across the border. And Hezbollah retaliated by firing Katyusha rockets into Israel. In fact, Hezbollah launched an initial round of Katyushas at the time of its cross border raid. The katyusha attacks escalated and expanded to most parts of northern Israel after the Israeli air strikes began.



Error (Los Angeles Times, sidebar, 5/1/07): Hezbollah militants begin a series of deadly rocket strikes into Israel that will continue for the duration of the conflict, striking as far south as Haifa, Israel's third-largest city.

Correction (5/11/07): Lebanon: A background box accompanying a May 1 article in Section A about Israel Prime Minister Ehud Olmert incorrectly said that during last summer's war in Lebanon, Hezbollah fired rockets "as far south as Haifa, Israel's third-largest city." Some of the rockets landed farther south than Haifa.



Error (Philadelphia Inquirer headline to AP article by Ramit Plushnick-Masti, 10/23/06 ): Israel says it used banned shells in war

Correction (10/27/06): A headline Monday incorrectly stated that Israel used "banned" shells during the war with Hezbollah. While the article said the Geneva Conventions ban the use of white phosphorous as an incendiary against civilians or civilian areas, Cabinet Minister Yaakov Edri said Israel used the shells against Hezbollah "in attacks against military targets in open ground."



Error (AP, Mark Lavie, 8/2/06): The Israeli military's inquiry on the bombing of a building in the south Lebanese village of Qana that killed 56 civilians ...

Correction (Updated story, 8/3/06): The Israeli military's inquiry on the bombing of a building in the south Lebanese village of Qana that killed at least 28 civilians ...



Error (Los Angeles Times, headline, 7/29/06): Israel Rejects Peace Offer

Correction (8/2/06): Middle East warfare: A Page One headline on Saturday saying "Israel Rejects Peace Offer" inaccurately summarized Israel's response to Lebanon's seven-point proposal. No formal offer had been presented to the Israeli government, so none had been rejected.



Error (New London Day, Hassan Fouda op-ed, 7/24/05): During Israel's two-decade-long occupation of southern Lebanon, Israeli forces murdered over 20,000 Lebanese and Palestinians, including more than 1,000 in a single day in the refugee camps of Sabra and Shatila, overseen by none other than then Israeli Defense Minister Ariel Sharon.

Correction (8/9/05): Hassan Fouda's July 24 column inaccurately claimed that Israeli forces murdered 1,000 people in a single day in the refugee camps of Sabra and Shatila in Southern Lebanon in 1982. In fact, no Israelis were directly involved and the murders were carried out by Lebanese Christian militiamen. Israel's Kahan Commission later concluded that Defense Minister Ariel Sharon was indirectly responsible since he should have taken stronger steps to prevent the violence.

Error (BBC News Web site, 3/22/04): Hezbollah says the Shebaa Farms area is Lebanese territory, but Israel says the farms are on the Syrian side of the border and so are part of the Golan Heights, which it has occupied since 1967.

Correction (Posted as of 3/25/04): Hezbollah says the Shebaa Farms area is Lebanese territory, but Israel, backed by the UN, says the farms are on the Syrian side of the border and so are part of the Golan Heights, which it has occupied since 1967.



Error (MSNBC, "Holy War, Holy Land," John Seigenthaler, 10/25/01): But when Time Magazine claims Sharon incited the Christian Phalangists before the murder spree [in Sabra and Shatilla], he sues for libel. Sharon and the magazine settle out of court.

Correction (Correction (in multiple reruns)): But when Time Magazine claims Sharon incited the Christian Phalangists before the murder spree, he sues for libel. A jury calls the article false and defamatory, but not libelous.



Error (Seattle Times, 10/7/01): Sharon is widely hated among Arabs for leading attacks on refugee camps in Lebanon in 1982.

Correction (10/14/01): In 1983, an Israeli commission found that Ariel Sharon, now Israel’s prime minister, was indirectly responsible for a 1983 attack on Palestinian refugee camps by Lebanese Christian soldiers. Sharon’s role as Israel’s former minister of defense was incorrectly stated in an article accompanying this map.



Error (New York Times, 2/17/01): Headline: Rocket Kills Israeli Soldier in Lebanon. Caption: An Israeli who was wounded yesterday when a Hezbollah rocket hit an Israeli military vehicle in Lebanon.

Correction (2/21/01): An article on Sunday reported the killing of an Israeli soldier by Hezbollah guerillas in the disputed Shabaa Farms area, controlled by Israel. The headline and the picture caption said that the attack occurred in Lebanon. That is the contention of the Hezbollah guerillas, who say Israel is illegally occupying the 10 square miles at the far southeastern corner of Lebanon. But the United Nations has agreed with Israel that compliance with Security Council Resolution 425, which called for the Israelis’ withdrawal from Lebanon, need not entail giving up Shabaa Farms, which they captured in 1967. The headline and the caption should have used impartial terminology, as the article did.



Error (Boston Globe headline, 5/31/00): Last Israeli soldier to die in Lebanon is mourned.

Correction (6/1/00): Because of an editing error, a headline in yesterday’s A section incorrectly described the circumstances of the death of the last Israeli soldier killed before Israel pulled its troops out of south Lebanon. The soldier was on the Israeli side of the border when he was hit by a rocket.



Error (New York Times, photo caption, 3/15/00): Classmates of a girl killed by Israeli shelling of Mansuri in southern Lebanon at her funeral.

Correction (3/17/00): A photo caption on Wednesday about Israeli air raids on Lebanon misidentified the force whose shelling killed a student in southern Lebanon. It was the South Lebanon Army, a militia backed by Israel that was attacking the area along with Israeli forces, not the Israeli military.