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Corrected

Palestinian Prisoners

Error (Reuters, Dan Williams, 8/2/15): According to the Israeli human rights group B'Tselem, 5,442 Palestinians were in detention without trial as of June.

Correction (8/3/15): According to the Israeli human rights group B'Tselem, 391 Palestinians were in detention without trial as of May.

[Note at top of article:] (In August 2 story, corrects number of Palestinians held in detention without trial in paragraph 10 to .. 391 as of May ..not.. 5,442 as of June)



Error (New York Times, Said Ghazali and Isabel Kershner, 2/3/15): Mr. Sabaaneh's cartoons have at times gotten him in trouble with the Israeli authorities. In February 2013 he was detained at the crossing between Jordan and the West Bank and was held for five months in an Israeli prison. He has said that he was charged in a military court with collaboration with the Islamist militant group Hamas because he had published some cartoons in a book written by his brother, who is a member.

Correction (Online as of 2/10/2015): An earlier version of this article referred incompletely to Muhammad Sabaaneh's legal trouble with the Israeli authorities. He received a five-month prison sentence after a conviction for handling funds from an illegal organization on behalf of his brother, a member of Hamas. Because of an editing error, the article also overstated what is known about the genesis of the charges. Although Mr. Sabaaneh has said he was charged because some of his cartoons had been published in a book by his brother, the Israeli authorities have not cited that as a reason.



Error (Independent, Adam Withnall, 1/1/14): An Israeli human rights organisation has accused the government of torturing Palestinian children after it emerged some were kept for months in outdoor cages during winter.

Correction (1/12/14): After original publication of its report, the Public Committee Against Torture in Israel released an amended version, acknowledging that the information from the Public Defender’s Office about child prisoners being kept in cages did not refer specifically to Palestinians.  We have amended our report accordingly and wish to make the position clear.



Error (Ha'aretz, Barak Ravid and Jonathan Lis, 10/28/13): The Prime Minister’s Office stated that all of the prisoners slated for release were involved in attacks before the Oslo Accords were signed, and all received sentences of between 17 and 27 years in prison.

Correction (10/29/13): Due to a translation error, an article by Barak Ravid and Jonathan Lis ("Ministers approve release of 26 Palestinian prisoners for peace talks," October 28) incorrectly stated the length of the sentences handed to the 26 Palestinians due to be released this week. They were all sentenced to life terms or at least 30 years.



Error (Guardian, Harriet Sherwood, 10/13/13): [Tamer] Za’anin, who had been denied permission by Israel to visit her husband in prison since his conviction for membership of the militant organisation Islamic Jihad just a few months after their marriage, consulted [the fertility doctor] by phone.

Correction (10/15/13): Za’anin, who had been denied permission by Israel to visit her husband in prison since his conviction on four counts of aiding in attempted murder and for membership of the militant organisation Islamic Jihad just a few months after their marriage, consulted him by phone.



Error (Ha'aretz, Jack Khoury, 4/23/13): During the hearing, which took place next door to [Samer] Issawi's hospital room, he stood up and removed his clothes. He looked very thin and skeleton-like, according to witnesses present at the hearing. "You showed this look a few days ago when you showed the victims of the Holocaust," Issawi then told the hearing, referring to Holocaust Remembrance Day earlier this month.

 
People who attended the meeting said that Kaufmann and the military prosecutors were shocked at how Issawi looked and agreed with the comparison.


Correction (4/24/13): Jack Khoury's article on April 23 ("Palestinian hunger striker refuses to participate in trial") contained a translation error. It should have stated that people who attended Samer Issawi's hearing said that Judge Dalia Kaufmann and the military prosecutors were shocked both by Issawi's appearance and by the comparison he made between his appearance and that of a Holocaust survivor.



Error (Ha'aretz, Zvi Bar'el, 2/27/13): [Shin Bet chief Yoram] Cohen is the man who decided whether to arrest Samer Issawi last August after he had been released in the deal in which abducted soldier Gilad Shalit was exchanged for 477 Palestinian prisoners.

Correction (2/28/13): An article by Zvi Bar'el ("Israel's seventh gatekeeper," Haaretz, February 27) incorrectly stated the number of Palestinian prisoners freed as part of the Shalit exchange deal. The correct number is 1,027.

Error (Ha'aretz, Zvi Bar'el, Op-Ed, 2/27/13): [Shin Bet chief Yoram] Cohen is the man who decided whether to arrest Samer Issawi last August after he had been released in the deal in which abducted soldier Gilad Shalit was exchanged for 477 Palestinian prisoners.

Correction (Online as of 2/27/12): Cohen is the man who decided whether to arrest Samer Issawi last August after he had been released as part of the Shalit exchange deal.



Error (AP, photo caption, Tara Todras Whitehill, 10/23/11): In this photo taken Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011, freed Palestinian prisoner Hamuda Saleh, age 38, who was originally from the West Bank city of Nablus, prays near the pool at a hotel in Gaza City. Palestinian prisoners exiled to the Gaza Strip in a dramatic swap for a captive Israeli soldier last week are contemplating the rest of their lives after years behind bars. Some say they want to put their violent pasts behind them and move on with their lives, now that the celebrations marking their release have faded. In 1989 Saleh claims he was sentenced to multiple life sentences for being part of the 'Ezz Al-Din Al Qassam' militia, the military wing of Hamas.

Correction (10/24/11): In this photo taken Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011, freed Palestinian prisoner Hamuda Saleh, age 38, who was originally from the West Bank city of Nablus, prays near the pool at a hotel in Gaza City. Palestinian prisoners exiled to the Gaza Strip in a dramatic swap for a captive Israeli soldier last week are contemplating the rest of their lives after years behind bars. Some say they want to put their violent pasts behind them and move on with their lives, now that the celebrations marking their release have faded. In 1989 Saleh claims he was sentenced to multiple life sentences for being part of the 'Ezz Al-Din Al Qassam' militia, the military wing of Hamas. A list of prisoners released by Israel's Prison service states Saleh was born in 1976, arrested in 2000 and sentenced to 22 years in jail for premeditated murder, membership in an unrecognized organization, planting a bomb and shooting at people.



Error (AP, Steve Weizman, 5/7/07): Israel's Justice Ministry, which received a copy of the [B'Tselem] report, said in response that Shin Bet interrogations are "performed in accordance with the law." The report is "fraught with mistakes, groundless claims and inaccuracies," the ministry said, without elaborating.

Correction (5/7/07): The report is "fraught with mistakes, groundless claims and inaccuracies," the ministry said, but added that it could not give a detailed rebuttal to the allegations of illegal interrogation methods "due to confidentiality reasons." The ministry did respond specifically to other charges in the report, unequivocally denying that interrogators sought to isolate and alienate prisoners, used bad language in front of them and served intentionally unappetizing food. "This bizarre claim is unfounded and is indicative of the lack of seriousness and tendentiousness of the person claiming it," the ministry said of the food allegation.



Error (AP, Ali Daraghmeh, 6/2/05): . . . . Israel refuses to free anyone involved in attacks on Israelis.

Correction (Updated story, 6/2/05): . . . . Israel refuses to free anyone directly involved in attacks that injured or killed Israelis.



Error (Ha'aretz Magazine, Gideon Levy, 1/21/05): Have you ever stopped for a moment next to a sign that leads to the Ofer camp, a euphemism for a mass detention facility in which about 800,000 Palestinians are now imprisoned, most of them without trial?

Correction (On Web site as of 1/28/05, not corrected in print): Have you ever stopped for a moment next to a sign that leads to the Ofer camp, a euphemism for a mass detention facility in which about 800 Palestinians are now imprisoned, most of them without trial?



Error (NPR, "All Things Considered," Julie McCarthy, 8/6/03): Newly released Ahmad Gnamat served five years for throwing stones at Israeli soldiers and said there was no reason to rejoice.

Correction (8/14/03): In an August 6th story on the Israeli release of Palestinian prisoners, we mistakenly described one of the freed men as having served five years in prison for throwing stones at Israeli soldiers. In fact, he was sentenced for involvement in Hamas and producing explosives.



Error (Chicago Tribune, Uli Schmetzer, 7/5/03): Israel is obliged under the peace process to release prisoners, and Prime Minister Ariel Sharon is in a bind.

Correction (7/10/03): A story in the main news section Saturday about the Middle East incorrectly stated that Israel is obliged under the peace process to release prisoners. It is not.



Error (Associated Press, Sari Bashi, 5/17/00): Israel has released hundreds of prisoners as part of detailed peace accords but says it will not release Palestinians jailed for killing Israelis.

Correction (6/6/00): The Associated Press erroneously reported on May 14 that Israel has released hundreds of Palestinians prisoners as part of peace agreements.

Since the 1993 Oslo peace accords, Israel has freed more than 7,000 Palestinians jailed for anti-Israel activities as part of peace deals.



Error (Boston Globe, Charles Sennott, 12/3/98): Israel released 150 Palestinian prisoners last month, but Palestinian leaders say half of them were common criminals and not the political prisoners they had expected to be freed.

Correction (12/5/98): Because of a reporting error, a Page One story on Thursday incorrectly stated that the Israeli government recently released 150 Palestinian prisoners last month. The correct number, as the Globe has reported in the past, is 250 prisoners.