Sunday, February 25, 2018
  Home
RSS Feed
Facebook
Twitter
Search:
Media Analyses
Journalists
Middle East Issues
Christian Issues
Names In The News
CAMERA Authors
Headlines & Photos
Errors & Corrections
 Corrected
 Uncorrected
 Dismal Corrections
Film Reviews
CAMERA Publications
Film Suggestions
Be An Activist
Adopt A Library
History of CAMERA
About CAMERA
Join/Contribute
Contact CAMERA
Contact The Media
Privacy Policy
 
Corrected

Judaism in Israel

Error (Boston Globe, AP article by Amy Tiebel, 12/30/09): Israel's Supreme Court ordered the military yesterday to allow Palestinians to travel on the part of a major highway that runs through the West Bank, handing Palestinians their biggest victory yet against Israel's practice of reserving some roads for Jews.

Correction (1/5/09): An Associated Press story on Dec. 30 incorrectly stated Israeli restrictions on road travel. Israel reserves some roads for the use of Israeli citizens.



Error (BBC Web site, 7/25/08): The Western, or Wailing, Wall, is the holiest place in Judaism.

Correction (12/18/08): The Western, or Wailing, Wall, is one of the holiest places in Judaism.

Update 18 December 2008: This story originally referred to the Wailing Wall as the holiest place in Judaism. This reference has been amended.



Error (AFP, 6/10/05): The compound which houses Al-Aqsa, the third holiest site in Judaism, also contains the Western Wall, the most sacred site in Judaism.

Correction (Updated story, 6/10/05): The compound which houses Al-Aqsa, the third holiest site in Islam, also contains the Western Wall, the most sacred site in Judaism.

Fact: Left uncorrected is the false statement that the Western Wall is the most sacred site in Judaism. The Temple Mount is the most sacred site.

Error (Associated Press Worldstream, Mark Lavie, 4/28/05): The main focus of tension in the city is a holy site revered by both Christians and Muslims - the traditional burial site of the biblical Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and three of their wives.

Correction (Updated story, 4/28/05): The main focus of tension in the city is a holy site revered by both Jews and Muslims - the traditional burial site of the biblical Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and three of their wives.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Mike Anton, 3/31/04): And, while waning, it [polygamy] is still practiced in the Muslim world and illegally in Israel by some ultra-Orthodox Jews, among other places.

Correction (4/9/04): Polygamy -- an article in the March 31 Calendar section about the history of marriage said polygamy is still practiced illegally in Israel by some ultra-Orthodox Jews. While there are a very small number of Yemenite polygamists in Israel, they are not part of the tradition of the broader ultra-Orthodox community.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Laura King, 4/5/04): What is traditionally one of the Jewish year’s most joyous occasions–the eight-day celebration of Passover, which begins tonight at sundown–is shadowed by a sense of foreboding.

Correction (4/7/04): Passover–An article in Section A on Monday about Passover jitters in Israel referred to the holiday as an eight-day celebration. Passover is celebrated for seven days in Israel, and eight days in the diaspora.