Wednesday, February 21, 2018
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Corrected

Gaza Strip

Error (AFP captions, 1/14/18): Palestinian security forces loyal to the Palestinian Authority (L), walk at the Kerem Shalom crossing, the main passage point for goods entering Gaza, after is was closed by Israel following the discovery of smuggling tunnels underneath the crossing, in the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafat on January 14, 2018. SAID KHATIB / AFP

Correction (1/17/18): Palestinian security forces loyal to the Palestinian Authority (L), walk at the Kerem Shalom crossing, the main passage point for goods entering Gaza, after is was closed by Israel following the discovery of tunnels underneath the crossing, in the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafat on January 14, 2018.



Error (Haaretz, 1/8/18): Less than two weeks after he wrote this, the army's criminal investigation division announced that it was investigating the death of Abu Thuraya, whose legs had been amputated after an Israeli air strike nine years ago.

Correction (1/14/18): Less than two weeks after he wrote this, the army’s criminal investigation division announced that it was investigating the death of double-amputee Abu Thuraya.



Error (Haaretz, photo caption, 12/31/17): Palestinian mourners carry the body of Ibrahim Abu Thuraya, a double amputee from a 1988 Israeli bombing, who was shot and killed by Israeli troops on the Israeli:Gaza border. Dec. 16, 2017

Correction (1/2/18): Palestinian mourners carry the body of Ibrahim Abu Thuraya, who was shot and killed in clashes on the Israel-Gaza border. Gaza City, Dec. 16, 2017



Error (DPA, photo captions, 12/16/17): Mother of Ibrahim Abu Thuraya (C), an activist who was shot dead by Israeli troops on Friday, during clashes following protests against US President Trump's decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, mourns during his funeral in Gaza City, Gaza, 16 December 2017. Abu Thuraya lost his legs and an eye in Israeli bombing during the 2008 Israel and Gaza war. Photo by Wisam Nassar/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

Correction (12/3/17): CAPTION CORRECTION (WRONG CIRCUMSTANCES) Dear customers, please note that the circumstances of the depicted events in the photos by Wisam Nassar with the image numbers'90-012537; 90-011299; 90-011318; 90-011360; 90-010435; 90-009949; 90-009643 are incorrect. The information to be corrected and the new caption are stated below. All photos will be resend to you. We apologise for the inconvenience. With kind regards dpa picture desk - Ph. +49 - 30 2852 31551. CORRECTS CIRCUMSTANCES THAT IBRAHIM ABU THURAYA LOST AN EYE AND HIS LEGS, CORRECTS THE STATEMENT THE WAS KILLED BY THE ISRAELI ARMY INCLUDES ISRAELI DENIAL OF INTENTIONALLY SHOOTING HIM dpatop - GRAPHIC'CONTENT - Mother of of activist Ibrahim Abu Thuraya (c), shot and killed during clashes with Israeli forces on the border with Gaza, mourns during his funeral in Gaza City, Gaza, 16 December 2017. The Israeli Army denied intentionally shooting Abu Thraya who according to recent media reports lost his legs and an eye in clashes with Israeli forces in April 2008. Relatives have claimed Abu Thraya lost his legs in an Israeli airstrike. Photo by: Wisam Nassar/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images



Error (AP, captions, 12/16/17): Palestinian mourners carry the body of 29-year-old activist Ibrahim Abu Thuraya who was shot and killed by Israeli troops Friday, in clashes on the Israeli border with Gaza, during his funeral in Gaza City, Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017. Abu Thuraya lost legs and an eye in Israeli bombing during the 2008 Israel and Gaza war. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Correction (1/1/18): CORRECTS DATE AND CIRCUMSTANCES THAT IBRAHIM ABU THRAYA LOST AN EYE AND HIS LEGS AND INCLUDES ISRAELI DENIAL OF INTENTIONALLY SHOOTING HIM -- Palestinian mourners carry the body of 29-year-old activist Ibrahim Abu Thraya, who was shot and killed during clashes with Israeli forces on the border with Gaza, at this funeral in Gaza City, Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017. The Israeli Army denied intentionally shooting Abu Thraya who lost his legs and an eye in clashes with Israeli forces April 11, 2008. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)



Error (Times of Israel, 12/15/17): In a post on its Arabic Facebook page, the Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories — Israel’s military liaison to the Palestinians — said the rocket hit a home belonging to an Egyptian family in the northern Gaza city of Beit Hanoun.

Correction (12/19/17): In a post on its Arabic Facebook page, the Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories — Israel’s military liaison to the Palestinians — said the rocket hit the home of the al-Masri family in the northern Gaza city of Beit Hanoun.



Error (Times of Israel, sub-headline, 12/15/17): Military says home in Bet Hanoun belonging to an Egyptian family hit by rocket, 2 days after a Gaza school was damaged in a similar incident

Correction (12/19/17): Military says home in Beit Hanoun hit by rocket, 2 days after a Gaza school was damaged in a similar incident



Error (AP, Josef Federman, 12/10/17): Israel has made neutralizing the tunnel threat a top priority since that war, when Hamas militants on several occasions made their way into Israel. Although they did not manage to reach civilian areas, the attacks caught Israel off guard and terrified the local population.

Correction (12/10/17): Israel has made neutralizing the tunnel threat a top priority since that war, when Hamas militants on several occasions made their way into Israel. Although they did not manage to reach civilian areas, the infiltrations caught Israel off guard, killing five soldiers in one attack, and terrified the local population.



Error (DPA, photo caption, 11/21/17): Young men sell vegetables on the street in Gaza, Palestinian Territories, 20 November 2017. Around three million inhabitants have suffered for years from polluted water, massive power cuts and a high unemployment rate.

Correction (11/21/17): Young men sell vegetables on the street in Gaza, Palestinian Territories, 20 November 2017. Around two million inhabitants have suffered for years from polluted water, massive power cuts and a high unemployment rate.



Error (NBCNews.com, Vivian Salama, 11/15/17): An Israeli-Saudi alliance would also be vastly unpopular on the Arab street given the ongoing occupation of the West Bank and Gaza.

Correction (11/20/17): An Israeli-Saudi alliance would also be vastly unpopular on the Arab street given Israel's actions in the West Bank and Gaza.



Error (Ynet, AP, Fares Akram, 10/2/17): Unemployment [in Gaza] is estimated at nearly 50 percent …

Correction (10/3/17): Unemployment is estimated at nearly 44 percent …



Error (AP, Farkes Akram, 10/2/17): Unemployment [in Gaza] is estimated at nearly 50 percent …

Correction (10/2/17): Unemployment is estimated at over 40 percent …



Error (Huffington Post, Hani Almadhoun, Op-Ed, 9/5/17): According to one report, there are 75 percent fewer trucks bringing food and other supplies into Gaza. That's 2,000 truckloads this year vs 8,000 in the same period of the previous year. This is an indicated of two things: a drop on demand due to a reduced amount of aid, and tougher economic realities.

Correction (9/7/17): [all of the above deleted]



Error (Huffington Post, Hani Almadhoun, Op-Ed, 9/5/17): Here are some dark numbers for you: 80 percent of Gaza residents live under the poverty line …

Correction (9/8/17): Here are some dark numbers for you: nearly 40 percent of Gaza's residents live below the poverty line …



Error (New York Times, Journeys, Seventy Years of the State of Israel): Drive south to meet Major Tal Shamir for a tour of the settlements surrounding the Gaza Strip.

Correction (Online as of 8/1/17): Drive south to meet Major Tal Shamir for a tour of the communities surrounding the Gaza Strip.



Error (Haaretz, Gideon Levy, 6/25/17): Between 130 and 150 people – most of them civilians, including women and children – paid with their lives for [Hadar Goldin's] killing and the abduction of his body during the 2014 Gaza war.

Correction (Online as of 6/28/17): Dozens of people – most of them civilians, including women and children – paid with their lives for his killing and the abduction of his body during the 2014 Gaza war.



Error (CNN, Ian Lee, 6/13/17): According to the United Nations, the unemployment rate in the strip hovers around 65% and one million people rely on food handouts from the UN's Palestinian refugee agency.

Correction (6/13/17): According to the United Nations, the unemployment rate in the strip is more than 40% and 1 million people rely on food handouts from the UN's Palestinian refugee agency. …

 
An earlier version of this article had the incorrect unemployment rate for Gaza. Gaza's unemployment rate is above 40%. The article also referred to the new Hamas policy document as a charter. This article has been changed to more accurately reflect this fact.



Error (Washington Post, Colby Itzkowitz, 3/3/17): Now 28 years old, Bashir is dedicating his life to fulfilling his father’s dream of peace among Israelis and Palestinians. It’s a life mission that brought him to the United States to finish high school, to attend college here and to immerse himself in a country that promises more than he could have ever dreamed in occupied Gaza.

Correction (Online as of 3/22/17): Now 28 years old, Bashir is dedicating his life to fulfilling his father’s dream of peace among Israelis and Palestinians. It’s a life mission that brought him to the United States to finish high school, to attend college here and to immerse himself in a country that promises more than he could have ever dreamed in Gaza.



Error (Daily Star (Lebanon), AP, Fares Akram, 2/22/17): In a welcome sign of normalcy, the first indoor shopping mall – complete with an international retail chain, three-story bookstore and bustling food court – has opened in the Gaza Strip.

Correction (2/23/17): In a welcome sign of normalcy, a new Western-style indoor shopping mall — complete with an international retail chain, three-story bookstore and bustling food court — has opened in the Gaza Strip.



Error (Daily Star (Lebanon), headline, 2/22/17): Gazans excited over territory's first indoor mall

Correction (2/23/17): Gazans excited over territory's new indoor mall



Error (Ynet, AP, Fares Akram, 2/22/17): In a welcome sign of normalcy, the first indoor shopping mall – complete with an international retail chain, three-story bookstore and bustling food court – has opened in the Gaza Strip.

Correction (2/23/17): In a welcome sign of normalcy, a new Western-style indoor shopping mall — complete with an international retail chain, three-story bookstore and bustling food court — has opened in the Gaza Strip.



Error (Ynet, AP, headline, 2/22/17): Gazans excited over territory's first indoor mall

Correction (2/23/17): Gazan's excited over territory's new indoor mall



Error (VOA, AP, photo captions, 2/22/17): Palestinians buy fast food from the food court in a shopping mall in the Gaza Strip, in Gaza City, Feb. 18, 2017. In a welcome sign of normalcy, the first indoor shopping mall – complete with an international retail chain, three story bookstore and food court – has opened in the Gaza Strip. The owners have overcome conflict and an Israeli-Egyptian blockade to build the gleaming 1,800 sq. meter (10,000 sq. feet) shopping center.

Correction (2/23/17): Palestinians buy fast food from the food court in a shopping mall in the Gaza Strip, in Gaza City, Feb. 18, 2017. In a welcome sign of normalcy, the mall – complete with an international retail chain, three-story bookstore and food court – has opened in the Gaza Strip. The owners have overcome conflict and an Israeli-Egyptian blockade to build the gleaming 1,800 sq. meter (19,000 sq. feet) shopping center.



Error (VOA, AP, Fares Akram, 2/22/17): In a welcome sign of normalcy, the first indoor shopping mall – complete with an international retail chain, three-story bookstore and bustling food court – has opened in the Gaza Strip.

Correction (2/23/17): In a welcome sign of normalcy, a new Western-style indoor shopping mall - complete with an international retail chain, three-story bookstore and bustling food court - has opened in the Gaza Strip.



Error (VOA, headline, 2/22/17): Gazans excited over territory's first indoor mall

Correction (2/23/17): Gazans excited over territory's new indoor mall



Error (AP, photo captions, 2/18/17): In this Saturday Feb. 18, 2017 photo, Palestinians buy fast food from the food court in the first indoor shopping mall in the Gaza Strip, in Gaza City. In a welcome sign of normalcy, the first indoor shopping mall – complete with an international retail chain, three story bookstore and food court – has opened in the Gaza Strip. The owners have overcome conflict and an Israeli-Egyptian blockade to build the gleaming 1,800 sq. meter (10,000 sq. feet) shopping center.



Correction (2/22/17): In this Saturday Feb. 18, 2017 photo, Palestinians buy fast food from the food court in a new indoor shopping mall in the Gaza Strip, in Gaza City. In a welcome sign of normalcy, the first-of-its-kind shopping mall – complete with an international retail chain, three-story bookstore and food court – has opened in the Gaza Strip. The owners have overcome conflict and an Israeli-Egyptian blockade to build the gleaming 1,800 sq. meter (19,000 sq. feet) shopping center.



Error (AP, Fares Akram, 2/22/17): In a welcome sign of normalcy, the first indoor shopping mall – complete with an international retail chain, three-story bookstore and bustling food court – has opened in the Gaza Strip.

Correction (2/22/17): In a welcome sign of normalcy, a new Western-style indoor shopping mall — complete with an international retail chain, three-story bookstore and bustling food court — has opened in the Gaza Strip.



Error (AP, headline, 2/22/17): Gazans excited over territory's first indoor mall

Correction (2/22/17): Gazan's excited over territory's new indoor mall



Error (Times of Israel, 1/23/17): According to Palestinian reports, the death toll reached 150, though the IDF estimated the number to be closer to 40.

Correction (1/23/17): According to Palestinian reports, the death toll reached approximately 120, though the IDF estimated the number to be closer to 40.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Nicholas Goldberg, book review, 9/2/16): In many circles, you're more likely to hear about Israel's settlements, intransigence and its nearly 50-year-long occupation of the West Bank and Gaza than you are about its pluck or ingenuity.

Correction (9/24/16): "Zionism" Book Review: A review of the book "Zionism" in the Sept. 4 Arts & Books section referred to Israel's "nearly 50-year-long occupation of the West Bank and Gaza." The United Nations, Human Rights Watch and the International Committee of the Red Cross, among others, consider Gaza part of the occupied Palestinian territories; Israel, which withdrew from the region in 2005, and some other scholars reject this characterization.



Error (Jerusalem Post, Arik Bender, 9/12/16): Meanwhile, Israel was prepared to thwart the flotilla from illegally infringing on the maritime blockade of Gaza, which was established in 2007 following the terrorist group Hamas's takeover of the Strip.

Correction (9/22/16): Meanwhile, Israel was prepared to thwart the flotilla from illegally infringing on the maritime blockade of Gaza, which was established in 2009, two years after the terrorist group Hamas's takeover of the Strip.



Error (Times of Israel, 9/9/16): But later on Friday evening army officials said troops were not operating in the area where the Palestinian teen was killed.

Correction (9/12/16): Later, the IDF said that while troops were in the area, they used tear gas only to counter violence across the border, and not live fire. “Dozens of rioters breached the buffer zone and attempted to damage the security (border) fence. … Forces stationed at the border used tear gas that led to the dispersal of the riot. Following a preliminary review, the Israel Defense Forces did not conduct the reported shooting,” said a military statement quoted by Reuters. …

 
This article was updated on September 12 to include that the IDF said its forces were in the area, and used tear gas, not live fire, in the incident.



Error (Times of Israel, subheadline, 9/9/16): Palestinian sources say army shot at rioters near Gaza Strip fence, but the military says no troops were operating in the area

Correction (9/12/16): Palestinian sources say army shot at rioters near Gaza Strip fence; the military says it used tear gas, not live fire



Error (AFP, photo captions, 9/9/16): Palestinian Territories, Deir el-Balah : Palestinian men mourn the death of 16-year-old Abdel Rahman al-Dabbagh, who according to the health ministry was shot dead by Israeli troops during clashes near the border fence, at a hospital morgue in the central Gaza Strip, on September 9, 2016. Ministry spokesman Ashraf al-Qodra identified the teenager as Abdel Rahman al-Dabbagh, and said he was killed east of Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza, saying the teenager was hit in the head and taken to hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Correction (9/11/16): Palestinian Territories, Deir el-Balah : Palestinian men mourn the death of 16-year-old Abdel Rahman al-Dabbagh, who according to the health ministry was shot dead by Israeli troops during clashes near the border fence, at a hospital morgue in the central Gaza Strip, on September 9, 2016. Ministry spokesman Ashraf al-Qodra identified the teenager as Abdel Rahman al-Dabbagh, and said he was killed east of Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza, saying the teenager was hit in the head and taken to hospital where he was pronounced dead. The Israeli army stressed that forces only used tear gas to disperse the youths.



Error (Reuters, photo caption, 9/9/16): A man mourns the death of Palestinian youth Abdulrahman Al-Dabag, who medics said was shot dead by Israeli troops on Friday, at a hospital in the central Gaza Strip September 9, 2016.

Correction (9/11/16): A man mourns the death of Palestinian youth Abdulrahman Al-Dabag, who medics said was shot dead by Israeli troops on Friday, at a hospital in the central Gaza Strip September 9, 2016. The Israeli army later said troops were not responsible for his death



Error (Reuters, photo caption, 9/9/16): A man mourns the death of Palestinian youth Abdulrahman Al-Dabag, who medics said was shot dead by Israeli troops on Friday, at a hospital in the central Gaza Strip September 9, 2016

Correction (9/11/16): A man mourns the death of Palestinian youth Abdulrahman Al-Dabag, who medics said was shot dead by Israeli troops on Friday, at a hospital in the central Gaza Strip September 9, 2016. The Israeli army later said troops were not responsible for Al-Dabag's death



Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid, 8/14/16): Gaza hospitals are perennially short of medicine, equipment and well-trained staff because of Israeli restrictions on travel and trade, and many Gaza residents struggle to get exit permits for care outside the territory.

Correction (Online 8/22/16): An earlier version of this article overstated the impact of Israeli restrictions on travel and trade in the Gaza Strip. Although they have made the import of some medical equipment difficult, the import of medicine is not restricted. The article also overstated what is known about the financing of Save a Child’s Heart. According to the charity’s director, Simon Fisher, it receives money from the governments of Israel, the European Union and the United States, as well as Christian ministries, Jewish congregations, public and private foundations and individuals worldwide, but he said did not know whether most of the money was from private Jewish donors. The article also misstated part of the name of the group led by Tony Laurance. It is Medical Aid for Palestinians, not Palestine.



Error (Times of Israel, Avi Issacharoff and Judah Ari Gross, 5/22/16): The move to freeze some imports in April caused a shutdown in construction in the Gaza Strip and sent unemployment and the cost of cement skyrocketing. The UN’s Palestinian refugee agency said Sunday that the unemployment rate in the Gaza Strip was 41.2% in the Gaza Strip in the first quarter of 2016.

Correction (5/22/16): The move to freeze some imports in April caused a shutdown in construction in the Gaza Strip and raised the unemployment rate as well as the cost of cement.



Error (New York Times, 7/18/16): A separate study, at Ben Gurion University, found that residents close to attack sites — in this case, those living in Israeli settlements in the Gaza Strip — reported a lower sense of personal threat and stress than those in two other communities, one in a Tel Aviv suburb and one in a larger settlement near the occupied West Bank city of Hebron. The research suggested that the religious fervor of the Gaza residents might have been a key factor.

Correction (Online as of 7/19/16): A separate study, done in 2003-4 at Ben Gurion University, found that residents close to attack sites — in this case, those living in Israeli settlements then in the Gaza Strip — reported a lower sense of personal threat and stress than those in two other communities, one in a Tel Aviv suburb and one in a larger settlement near the occupied West Bank city of Hebron. The research suggested that the religious fervor of the Gaza residents might have been a key factor.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Umar Farooq, 7/13/16): According to the World Health Organization, about 3,000 patients from Gaza with life-threatening illnesses apply each month to get treatment at Israeli hospitals, but fewer than two-thirds receive security clearance to pass through the Erez crossing.

Correction (Online as of 7/13/16): According to the World Health Organization, about  2,000 patients from Gaza with life-threatening illnesses apply each month to get treatment at Israeli hospitals, but fewer than  three-quarters on average receive security clearance to pass through the Erez crossing.



Error (Reuters, Nidal Al-Mughrabi, 5/23/16): Israel resumed cement shipments to the Gaza Strip on Monday, ending a 45-day-old ban it imposed …

Correction (5/24/16): Israel on Monday resumed deliveries to the Gaza Strip of cement for home reconstruction by private individuals, ending a 45-day-old ban it imposed …

 
The Israeli ban had not affected cement deliveries for housing projects overseen by international aid groups and foreign governments. …
 
(This story has been corrected to clarify suspension affected only privately-imported cement)



Error (Reuters, headline, 5/23/16): Israel resumes cement shipments for Gaza reconstruction after 45-day break

Correction (5/24/16): Israel resumes cement shipments for private Gaza reconstruction after 45-day break

Error (New York Times, Diaa Hadid and Majd Al Waheidi, 5/20/16): In April, Israel suspended the delivery of cement to Gaza for the reconstruction of homes destroyed in the 2014 war …

Correction (5/23/16): In April, Israel suspended the delivery of cement to Gaza for private individuals intending to reconstruct homes destroyed in the 2014 war …

 
An earlier version of this article referred incompletely to Israel’s suspension of cement deliveries to Gaza for reconstruction of homes destroyed in the 2014 war. The suspension only affected homes being rebuilt by private individuals; cement continued to flow to housing projects handled by foreign governments and international aid groups.



Error (Haaretz, editorial, 5/17/16): [Israel] also allows the transfer of food and medicines and, in exceptional cases, even permits a few hundred people to leave – a little less than 1,000 people since January 2016.

Correction (Online 5/17/16): It also allows the transfer of food and medicines and, in exceptional cases, even permits a few hundred people to leave the Strip for abroad – a little less than 1,000 people since January 2016.



Error (Haaretz, 3/24/16): The image recalls that of Mohammed al-Dura, the boy who was shot and killed by Israeli forces in the Gaza Strip in September 2000, while his father tried to protect him — but this time the ending is better.

Correction (Online as of 3/27/16): The image recalls that of Mohammed al-Dura, the boy who was shot and killed in the Gaza Strip in September 2000, while his father tried to protect him – but this time the ending is better.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Kate Shuttleworth and Rushdi Abu Alouf, 3/13/16): The last missile attack from the Gaza Strip was in October 2015.

Correction (3/15/16): Gaza airstrikes: In the March 13 Section A, an article about a retaliatory airstrike by Israel reported that four missiles fired from the Gaza Strip into Israel last week were the first such projectiles fired since October. The missiles were the first since October to prompt an Israeli response that led to Palestinian deaths.

Fact: For details about the multiple Gaza rocket attacks against Israel since October 2015, including two each in November, December and January, see here.



Error (AFP, photo caption, 9/19/15): BEIT HANUN: Palestinians look at the damage following an Israeli air strike overnight in the northern Gaza strip of Beit Hanun on September 19, 2015. Two rockets were fired into southern Israel by Palestinian militants in Gaza, causing no casualties but triggering a series of Israeli air raids. AFP PHOTO / MAHMUD HAMS



Correction (9/21/15): JABALIA REFUGEE CAMP: Palestinians looks at a communication tower that was hit in an overnight Israeli air strike on a nearby training base of the Ezzedine al-Qassam Brigades, the military wing of the Islamist movement Hamas, on September 19, 2015 in the Jabalia refugee camp in the northern Gaza strip. Israeli warplanes bombed a base of the Ezzedine al-Qassam Brigades, according to a witness and a security official in Gaza, after two rockets were fired into southern Israel by Palestinian militants in Gaza. AFP PHOTO/MAHMUD HAMS



Error (Time.com, Jack Linshi, 9/1/15): Since the most recent Israeli military operation in 2014, more than 20,000 Palestinian homes, 148 schools and 60 healthcare centers in Gaza have been damaged or destroyed, according to the U.N.

Correction (9/6/15): The most recent Israeli military operation in 2014 left more than 20,000 Palestinian homes, 148 schools and 60 healthcare centers in Gaza damaged or destroyed, according to the U.N. . . .

This article originally misstated the period when buildings in Gaza sustained damage as detailed by the U.N. report. It was during the war of 2014.



Error (Reuters, Graphic, 7/10/15): Israel has blockaded Gaza, placing restrictions on people and goods leaving the enclave and goods entering it, since the Islamist group Hamas won power in Gaza in election in 2006.

Correction (7/13/15):

Israel and Egypt have maintained a blockade of Gaza since Hamas seized power there in 2007, although the extent of their restrictions have varied. Israel tightly restricts the movement of goods and people across its borders with Gaza, while Egypt has largely kept its border crossing at Rafah closed and has destroyed smuggling tunnels between Gaza and its territory.
 
Clarification: Like Israel, Egypt has also maintained a blockade of Gaza since Hamas seized power in 2007. An earlier version of this graphic included charts showing the movement of people between Gaza and Egypt, but did not include a description of this situation in the introduction.



Error (Haaretz, Op-Ed, 7/13/15): . . . I saw that Professor Asa Kasher, author of the Israel Defense Forces code of ethics, was not complaining about the deaths of more than 150 Palestinians on August 1that resulted from the operational interpretation of the army's so-called "Hannibal directive" . . .

Correction (Online as of 7/13/15): . . .I saw that Professor Asa Kasher, author of the Israel Defense Forces code of ethics, was not complaining about the deaths of dozens of Palestinians on August 1 that resulted from the operational interpretation of the army's so-called "Hannibal directive" . . .

 
[Appended to end of article:] This article was amended on 13.7.2015 to correct a translation error.



Error (AFP, 6/16/15): Some 17 journalists were killed covering the July-August Gaza war . . .

Correction (6/16/15): The Hamas-run ministry of information said 17 journalists were killed covering the July-August Gaza war . . .

 
That statistic is disputed by the privately-run Israeli Meir Amit Intelligence and Terrorism Information Centre, which says Hamas-linked media operatives or combatants were counted as journalists in Palestinian figures.
 
The International Federation of Journalists says at least 13 media workers were killed.



Error (CNN, Nic Robertson, 6/1/15): In 2006, Hamas, a group that wants to destroy Israel, and listed by the United States and European Union and others as a terrorist group, won a landslide victory in the Palestinian legislative elections, and Israel unilaterally pulled its forces out of Gaza that year.

Correction (Online as of 6/10/15): Israel pulled its forces out of Gaza in 2005. In 2006, Hamas, a group that wants to destroy Israel, and listed by the United States and European Union and others as a terrorist group, won a landslide victory in Palestinian legislative elections.



Error (New York Times, Somini Sengupta, 2/2/15): . . . .during the Gaza conflict, in which Palestinian militants fired hundreds of rockets into Israel . . .

Correction (2/3/15): Because of an editing error, an article on Tuesday about the resignation of the chairman of a United Nations panel investigating possible war crimes in the 50-day Gaza Strip conflict last summer misstated the volume of rockets fired by Palestinian militants into Israel during the conflict. It was in the thousands, not the hundreds.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Laura King, 8/21/14): Israel has mocked [Hamas leaders] for going into hiding even as more than 2,000 Palestinian civilians have been killed.

Correction (9/2/14): Gaza Strip: An article in the Aug. 21 A section said that more than 2,000 Palestinian civilians had been killed in the conflict in the Gaza Strip. Figures from the United Nations indicate that more than 2,000 Palestinians were killed, but the number who were civilians was less than 2,000.



Error (Washington Post, Sudarsan Raghavan, 7/30/14): After Hamas seized control of Gaza in 2007, Israel imposed a total blockade of the strip.

Correction (8/5/14): A July 30 A-section article on Palestinians in the West Bank who are separated from relatives in the Gaza Strip incorrectly reported that Israel imposed a"total" blockade on Gaza in 2007. Israel restricts, but does not completely prohibit, the movement of goods, resources and people between its territory and Gaza. The article also incorrectly said that the second Palestinian intifada, or uprising, in 2000 was a response to the Israeli occupation and expansion of settlements. While those were long-standing factors that contributed to Palestinian grievances against Israel, there were multiple triggers for the uprising, and whether it was spontaneous or planned is the subject of debate.



Error (Huffington Post UK, Paul Vale, 7/1/14): The deaths [of the three Israeli teens] let to a night of bombing by the Israeli Air Force, after Netanyahu promised Hamas would pay for the killings.

Correction (7/2/14): The Israeli Air Force has continued with airstrikes targeting the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip, in retaliation for militant rocket attacks launched against Jewish communities in southern Israel over the past two days.



Error (Huffington Post UK, headline, 7/1/14): Murdered Israeli Teens Given Joint Funeral As Aistrikes Against West Bank Continue

Correction (7/2/14): Murdered Israeli Teens Given Joint Funeral As Airstrikes Against Gaza Continue



Error (Haaretz, blog live update, 6/22/14): A Palestinian armed with a grenade was apprehended by security forces near the settlement of Sde Avraham.

Correction (6/22/14): A Palestinian armed with a grenade was apprehended by security forces near Sde Avraham, an Israeli community near the Gaza Strip.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 12/9/13): Separately, Israel on Sunday blocked the installation of a high-tech cargo scanner donated by the Netherlands at the commercial crossing from Gaza into Israel, citing security concerns. The scanner was intended to increase Gaza exports to the West Bank.

Correction (Online as of 12/15/13): Earlier versions of this article incorrectly stated that Israel had blocked the installation of a high-tech cargo scanner donated by the Netherlands at the commercial crossing between Gaza and Israel. The scanner was installed several weeks ago and is being used on agricultural goods bound for Europe, but Israel has prevented its use for exports to Israel and the West Bank.



Error (Ha'aretz, Gili Cohen, 9/23/13): For the first time in six years, construction materials like cement and steel were allowed in Gaza yesterday.

Correction (10/18/13): An article by Gili Cohen in Haaretz English Edition ("Cement enters Gaza Strip legally for first time in six years," September 23) incorrectly asserted that Israel has barred the import of cement and steel to the Gaza Strip since 2007. The report should have stated that Israel has further eased restriction on the import of these materials to the Gaza Strip.



Error (Ha'aretz, Op-Ed, Gideon Levy, 3/31/13): Amnesty International, for instance, enumerated only 92 Palestinian fighters among the dead [in Operation Cast Lead.]

Correction (4/4/13): An article by Gideon Levy ("Deadly turning point," Haaretz, March 31) incorrectly quoted a Amnesty International report as saying that "92 Palestinian fighters were killed during Operation Cast Lead." This figure does not appear in the report.



Error (USA Today, Michele Chabin and Vanessa O'Brien, 3/20/13): Palestinians here said Obama should focus on the Israeli checkpoints and a cement security barrier that has prevented Palestinian terrorists from blowing up buses in Israel, but bar all but a few thousand Palestinians from accessing jobs, universities and hospitals in Israel.

Correction (3/25/13): A story on Palestinians in the West Bank on March 20 should have made clear that the number of Palestinians who work in Israel annually exceeds 30,000, and the number who receive medical treatment in Israeli hospitals surpassed 200,000 in 2012, according to Israel's Ministry of Foreign Affairs.



Error (Ha'aretz, Chaim Levinson and Jack Khoury, 1/16/13): The incidents came a day after Israeli soldiers shot and killed a Palestinian man in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya near the border with Israel. Gazan officials said Mustafa Abu Jarad, 21, was a farmer. He was taken to Shifa hospital, where doctors said he died from his wounds.

Correction (Online as of 1/24/13): The incidents came a day after Palestinian sources said that Israeli soldiers shot and killed a Palestinian man in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya near the border with Israel. Gazan officials said Mustafa Abu Jarad, 21, was a farmer. He was taken to Shifa hospital, where doctors said he died from his wounds. The IDF denied involvement in the incident.



Error (Ha'aretz, Chaim Levinson and Jack Khoury, 1/16/13): The incidents came a day after Israeli soldiers shot and killed a Palestinian man in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya near the border with Israel. Gazan officials said Mustafa Abu Jarad, 21, was a farmer. He was taken to Shifa hospital, where doctors said he died from his wounds.

Correction (2/7/13): In the article "IDF kills fourth Palestinian in a week," by Jack Khoury and Chaim Levinson, published on January 16, the reported shooting death of a Palestinian man by Israeli forces should have been attributed to Palestinian sources. It should also have been noted that the IDF denied involvement in the incident.



Error (Christian Science Monitor Jerome Slater Op-Ed, 1/7/13): Ban lifted: A truck loaded with building materials drives at the Rafah crossing with Egypt, in the southern Gaza Strip Dec. 30. Israel had banned construction materials for Gaza after Hamas seized control there in 2007.

As part of a November ceasefire agreement with Hamas, Israel has partially lifted its blockade of the Gaza Strip, at least allowing construction materials into the region pummeled by Israeli airstrikes. It's a single, forward step that ends a five-year ban on such materials."

Among other measures, it has refused to allow Gaza a functioning airport, seaport, or commercial crossing on its border with Egypt, radically cutting Gazan trade and commerce with the outside world.



Correction (1/10/13): Ban lifted: A truck loaded with building materials drives at the Rafah crossing with Egypt, in the southern Gaza Strip Dec. 30. Israel had banned construction materials for Gaza's private sector after Hamas seized control there in 2007.

As part of a November ceasefire agreement with Hamas, Israel has partially lifted its blockade of the Gaza Strip, allowing private construction materials into the region pummeled by Israeli airstrikes. It's a single, forward step that ends a five-year ban on such materials."

"Among other measures, it has refused to allow Gaza a functioning airport or seaport, radically cutting Gazan trade and commerce with the outside world. [An earlier version of this paragraph was incorrect. See editor's note at the bottom of this article."

Editor's note: An earlier version of this article, based on reporting from the Associated Press, incorrectly described Israel's lifting of a 2007 ban on construction materials into Gaza. AP has issued a correction saying that the ban applied to materials for Gaza's private sector. Since the Hamas takeover of Gaza in 2007, Israel has allowed humanitarian-related construction materials and materials under UN auspices. Lifting the ban allows private business to ship materials to Gaza. Also, an earlier version incorrectly described Israeli embargo efforts at the Gaza-Egypt border. Israel does not control that border.



Error (Washington Post, Abigail Hauslohner, 1/6/13): . . . last Sunday, Israel allowed a cargo of building materials to enter Gaza for the first time in years.

Correction (1/9/13): A Jan. 6 A-section article about children growing up in the Gaza Strip incorrectly said that Israel recently allowed building materials to enter Gaza for the first time in years. The materials were the first for the private sector in five years; Israel had previously allowed the entry of some construction materials for Israeli-approved projects carried out by international aid organizations.



Error (Washington Post, Joel Greenberg, 1/5/13): The Fatah party of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas held a mass rally in Gaza on Friday to mark the 48thanniversary of its founding ….

Correction (1/8/13): A Jan. 5 A-section article about a mass rally in the Gaza Strip incorrectly said that it marked the 48th anniversary of the founding of the Palestinian political party Fatah. The rally commemorated the 48th anniversary of Fatah's first armed mission against Israel.



Error (NPR, "All Things Considered, Audie Cornish, 1/1/13): For the first time in five years, Israel is allowing shipments of gravel, cement, and other construction materials into Gaza.

Correction (1/8/13): First, we want to expand on and clarify a story that aired on New Year's Day. It was about Israel's decision to ease restrictions on the shipment of construction materials to Gaza. Our story failed to note that Israel previously allowed aid organizations to ship construction material into Gaza. The eased rules apply to private sector builders.



Error (NPR, "All Things Considered," Audie Cornish, 1/1/13): For the first time in five years, Israel is allowing shipments of gravel, cement and other construction materials into Gaza.

Correction (1/7/13, online transcript only): POST-BROADCAST CLARIFICATION: Previously, aid organizations had been allowed to import construction material into Gaza. The eased rules apply to private-sector builders.



Error (Guardian, Harriet Sherwood, 12/28/12): Meanwhile, Israel is to allow construction materials to enter Gaza from next week for the first time since 2007. Despite easing its blockade of the enclave two and a half years ago, it has continued to ban the import of almost all construction materials, such as cement and steel, saying they could be used for military purposes.

Correction (Online as of 1/7/13): This article was amended on 7 January 2013. The original said that “Israel is to allow construction materials to enter Gaza from next week for the first time since 2007. To clarify: limited quantities of building materials, for UN sponsored projects, were allowed to enter Gaza during that time, as was made clear in the next sentence.



Error (Los Angeles Times, wires, news brief, 12/31/12): In a major concession to the Gaza Strip's Hamas leaders, Israel dropped its 5-year-old ban on construction materials crossing into the territory . . .

Correction (1/4/13): A brief article in the Jan. 1 Section A said that Israel had dropped a 5-year-old ban on construction materials crossing into the Gaza Strip. That ban applied to the private sector; Israel had allowed some construction goods into Gaza for humanitarian projects during that time.



Error (International Herald Tribune, headline, 12/31/12): Israel allows building materials into Gaza for first time in 5 years

Correction (1/3/13): The headline accompanying an article Monday about Israel's decision to allow building materials into Gaza said incorrectly that recent shipments were the first in five years. They were the first for use by the private sector in that period; Israel had strictly controlled the entry of building materials, limiting them in recent years to internationally supervised projects.



Error (AP, Aron Heller and Ibrahim Barzak, 12/31/12): In a major concession to Gaza's Hamas leaders Monday, Israel dropped its five-year ban on construction materials crossing into the territory and raised hopes there that rebuilding could begin following a damaging eight-day Israeli air campaign.

Correction (1/1/13): In a story Dec. 31, The Associated Press reported that Israel dropped a 5 1/2-year-old ban that prevented construction materials from entering the Gaza Strip. The story should have made clear that the ban applied to Gaza's private sector. Under the closure, imposed following the Hamas militant group's takeover of Gaza in June 2007, Israel allowed small amounts of construction goods into Gaza for humanitarian projects. In 2010 it began allowing such materials for projects under the auspices of the United Nations. Monday's announcement by Israel, part of a cease-fire deal reached with Hamas in November, further eases the ban by allowing private businesses to ship in building materials.



Error (Ha'aretz, Anshel Pfeffer, 11/23/12): . . . Egyptian Prime Minister Hisham Kandil, during his visit on Friday to Gaza, posed for a joint photograph with Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh, holding together the body of a dead baby boy killed in an Israeli air strike.

Correction (Online as of 11/28/12): . . . Egyptian Prime Minister Hisham Kandil, during his visit on Friday to Gaza, posed for a joint photograph with Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh, holding together the body of a dead baby boy, the circumstances of whose death are the subject of much debate, with evidence emerging that he was not killed in an Israeli air strike, as the Palestinians claim, but by an errant missile fired from inside Gaza.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Edmund Sanders, 11/20/12): On Monday, Israel attacked the Sharouk communications building in Gaza City where it said four senior members of the Islamic Jihad militant group were meeting.

Among the dead was Ramez Harb, a Palestinian journalist. Israel said he was a legitimate target because he served in the information department of Islamic Jihad.

Correction (11/23/12): Gaza fighting: In the Nov. 20 Section A, an article about attacks by Israel and Hamas referred to Ramez Harb, who was killed in an Israeli strike on the Gaza Strip, as a journalist. Although initial reports said Harb worked for a Palestinian news agency, he was a member of the militant group Islamic Jihad.



Error (El Pais, Ignacio Cembrero and Ramon Besa, 9/28/12): Shalit, who wanted to do military service in a combat unit, was captured by Hamas in 2006, and spent five years in captivity until he was exchanged in 2011 for 477 Palestinian prisoners.

Correction (9/29/12): Corporal Gilad Shalit was not involved in any killing in Gaza, in contrast to what was stated in the subheading of a September 26 Sports section article regarding his attendance at a Barca-Real Madrid [football match] on October 7, at Camp Nou. Shalit was apprehended by Hamas on the Gaza border in 2006 and was held captive for five years until he was exchanged for 1027 Palestinian prisoners, not 477 as stated on Wednesday and yesterday.



Error (El Pais, Ignacio Cembrero and Ramon Besa, 9/26/12): . . . Shalit wasn't liberated until October 2011 in exhange for Israel's release of 477 Palestinian prisoners, many of them in administrative detention without trial

Correction (9/29/12): Corporal Gilad Shalit was not involved in any killing in Gaza, in contrast to what was stated in the subheading of a September 26 Sports section article regarding his attendance at a Barca-Real Madrid [football match] on October 7, at Camp Nou. Shalit was apprehended by Hamas on the Gaza border in 2006 and was held captive for five years until he was exchanged for 1027 Palestinian prisoners, not 477 as stated on Wednesday and yesterday



Error (El Pais, sub-headline, 9/26/12): Controversy over the alleged invitation by Barca [Football Club] to an Israeli soldier, involved in a Gaza massacre, to attend the Camp Nou classic Oct. 7 against Madrid.

Correction (9/29/12): Corporal Gilad Shalit was not involved in any killing in Gaza, in contrast to what was stated in the subheading of a September 26 Sports section article regarding his attendance at a Barca-Real Madrid [football match] on October 7, at Camp Nou. Shalit was apprehended by Hamas on the Gaza border in 2006 and was held captive for five years until he was exchanged for 1027 Palestinian prisoners, not 477 as stated on Wednesday and yesterday.

Error (ABC News Web site, Abby D. Phillip, 10/22/12): Obama's relationship with Netanyahu has been rocked by several public strains in the past four years, including disagreements about Israel's expansion of settlements in the Gaza Strip.

Correction (Posted as of 11/4/12): Obama's relationship with Netanyahu has been rocked by several public strains in the past four years, including disagreements about Israel's expansion of settlements in the West Bank.



Error (Guardian, Sarah Irving, travel piece, 11/18/11): Israeli border authorities control all routes into the West Bank and Gaza.

Correction (12/15/11): Granted, tourism to Palestine still faces many challenges, not least the Israeli border authorities who control all routes into the West Bank. . . .

This article was amended on 15 December 2011. The original said the Israeli border authorities controlled all routes into the West Bank and Gaza. This has been corrected.



Error (Washington Post, Map by Laris Karklis, 12/4/11): Israel withdrew from Gaza in 2005, but still controls all border crossings, the waters off its coast and its airspace.

Correction (12/7/11): Text on a map with a Dec. 4 Page One article about Israel's use of drone aircraft incorrectly said that Israel controls all border crossings with Gaza. It controls the crossings between Gaza and Israel but not the Rafah crossing between Gaza and Egypt.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Christopher Hawthorne, 2/2/11): "Decolonizing Architecture" is driven by a simple but provocative question: If and when Israel decides, or is compelled, to leave the occupied territories in the Gaza Strip and West Bank, what should returning Palestinians do with the buildings, roads and bridges the army and the settlers leave behind?

Correction (2/4/2011): "Decolonizing Architecture": A review of the exhibition "Decolonizing Architectue" in the Feb. 2 Calendar section implied that Israel continues to occupy the Gaza Strip. In fact, Israeli forces pulled out of the area in 2005.



Error (Philadelphia Inquirer headline, 1/11/11): Rockets Strike Gaza Town

Correction (1/12/11): A headline Tuesday on a story about Israeli-Palestinian tensions misidentified the target of rocket attacks that took place Monday. The rockets were fired from Gaza and struck the Israeli city of Ashkelon.



Error (AFP, 1/6/11): Mahmud Zahar made the remarks during a memorial ceremony for 43 Palestinians who were killed at a UN school in the Jabaliya refugee camp during Israel's 22-day war on Gaza that began in December 2008. . .

Zahar was speaking on the second anniversary of an Israeli air strike on the United Nations' Al-Fakhura school in the northern Gaza Strip. . . .

Before an auidence that included members of the Hamas leadership in Gaza, Zahar paid tribute to those who died in the school where they had taken refuge from the heavy fighting.



Correction (1/11/11): ATTENTION - CORRECTION: In Israel-Palestinians-conflict-Gaza-Holocaust-Jews moved Jan. 6, please read in paras 2,4 and 6 xxx near a UN school xxx sted at as sent. Herewith a corrected repeat:///

Mahmud Zahar made the remarks during a memorial ceremony for 43 Palestinians who were killed near a UN school in the Jabaliya refugee camp during Israel's 22-day war on Gaza that began in December 2008. . . .

Zahar was speaking on the second anniversary of an Israeli air strike near the United Nations' Al-Fakhura school in the northern Gaza Strip. . . .

Before an audience that included members of the Hamas leadership in Gaza, Zahar paid tribute to those who died near the school where they had taken refuge from the heavy fighting.



CAMERA: Furthermore, the figure of 43& casualties from the Al-Fakhura Street incident is heavily disputed, and has not been proven. The Goldstone Report (hardly friendly towards Israel), acknowledged that it did not have definitive information on the number of casualties, but cited far fewer than 43. Paragraph 661 says that the reported three shells which hit "al-Fakhura Street killed at least 24 people. The witnesses estimate that up to another 40 were injured by the blasts. The Mission has not been able to verify those figures, but having inspected the site and viewed the footage, it does not consider these numbers to be exaggerated." (Emphasis added.) The Palestinian Center for Human Rights (PCHR), in its list of casualties from the winter fighting, only identifies 18 Palestinians who were killed "opposite" or "near" the Al-Fakhura school on Jan. 6.  The Israeli military, in an investigation of the incident, found that 12 to 17 people were killed in the strike, including several fighters (Jerusalem Post, April 24, 2009).
 
In addition, the tendentious language ought to have been corrected. Israel did not launch a war "on Gaza," as witnessed by the tons of aid that Israel transferred to the Gaza Strip during the fighting. Rather, Israel launched a war on Hamas.



Error (Ha'aretz, headline, 11/1/2010): Report: Hamas admits for first time losing 200-300 men in Gaza war

Correction (Updated headline): Report: Hamas admits for first time losing more than 600 men in Gaza war



Error (International HeraldTribune, Neil MacFarquhar, 9/16/09): The [Goldstone] report did not take a position on the hotly contested number of civilian casualties during the Gaza war. It noted that they range from the Israeli government figure of 1,166 to the Hamas figure of 1,444, with a couple of humanitarian organizations' estimates somewhere between.

Correction (9/25/09): An article Sept. 16 on casualties in the Gaza Strip war said 1,116 Palestinian civilians had been killed in the fighting. The figure actually covers the overall number of Palestinian casualties: civilians, combatants and unknowns. The proportion of civilian casualties remains in dispute.

CAMERA: In addition, Hamas' number of 1,444 relates to the group's claim about the total number of Palestinian casualties in the Gaza fighting, civilians and combatants alike.



Error (Charlston Gazette, Op-Ed by Eva Knapp, 4/12/09): A 2008 study by the Red Cross ... shows half of Gazan children under the age of 12 have lost their "will to live." ...

In 2002, then Israeli Defense Forces chief of staff said, "The Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people."

Correction (7/19/09): An April 12 commentary "America must stop blessing killings of Palestinians" by Eva Knapp contained an unverified quotation. Moshe Yaalon, a former Israeli Defense Forces chief of staff, was quoted as saying that "the Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people." Although cited often, the quote does not appear in the Israeli newspaper interview where it is usually attributed and should not have appeared in the Sunday Gazette-Mail.

The same commentary also attributes to an unpublished 2008 Red Cross study the conclusion that "half of Gazan children under the age of 12 have lost their 'will to live.'" A news account of that study by the Independent includes no such statement.



Error (Wall Street Journal, Charles Levinson, 1/12/09): The U.N. resumed aid deliveries in the Gaza Strip on Sunday, two days after it halted them following an incident in which Israeli soldiers fired on U.N. workers in two separate incidents, killing one and injuring two, a spokesman said

Correction (1/18/09): Israel's military investigated an incident in which a United Nations spokesman alleged Israeli forces fired on a U.N. truck on Jan. 8. Israel said the investigation showed its forces had not fired on the truck. A Jan. 12 World News article citing the U.N. allegation didn't include Israel's statement on the event.



Error (San Diego Union-Tribune, column by Miko Peled, 1/2/09): The people of Gaza live in a population density of 8,000 people per square mile, the highest in the world

Correction (1/15/09): A Jan. 2 Opinion page column by Miko Peled, "Recognizing good people in Gaza," incorrectly stated that the population density in Gaza is the highest in the world. In fact, there are several areas with a higher population density, including Singapore and Hong Kong.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Richard Boudreaux, 1/28/08): Israel began reducing the flow of electricity . . . across Gaza's borders after the militant Islamic movement Hamas, which had won parliamentary elections in 2006, seized full control of the territory in June.

Correction (3/25/08): Gaza electricity: A Section A article on Jan. 28 reported that Israel had begun reducing the flow of electricity to the Gaza Strip after the Islamic movement Hamas seized full control of the territory in June. Although Israeli sanctions had caused electricity shortages by curtailing supplies of diesel fuel to Gaza's only power plant, Israel did not reduce the amount of electricity it sells to Gaza until early February.



Error (Washington Times, Nicholas Kralev, 3/6/08): Mr. [Mahmoud] Abbas suspended talks with Israel over the weekend because of its military offensive against Hamas in Gaza in response to the rocket attacks. More than 120 civilians have died, including women and children

Correction (3/7/08): The Washington Times incorrectly reported yesterday the number of Palestinian civilians killed by Israeli military action in the Gaza Strip. Of more than 120 people killed during Israeli incursions into Gaza, the Israeli military estimates that about 10 percent were civilians. The Israeli human rights group B'Tselem said earlier this week that about half of the Palestinians killed in Gaza were noncombatants.



Error (Boston Globe, Reuters photo caption, 12/13/06): Palestinians displayed an image of the slain sons of an intelligence official at a rally yesterday in Gaza

Correction (12/14/06): The placement of a photograph on yesterday's World page of three slain Palestinian children with a story about an Israeli court ruling allowing Palestinians to sue Israel's military for damages may have implied that Israelis were responsible for the children's killings.  Palestinian gunmen are suspected of carrying out the killings.



Error (International Herald Tribune, Patrick Seale, Op-Ed, 10/28/06): The killing continues on a daily basis – by tank and sniper fire, by air and sea bombardment, and by undercover teams in civilian clothes sent into Arab territory to ambush and murder, an Israeli specialty perfected over the past several decade. . . . Five Israelis have been killed by these [Qassam] rocket attacks in the past six years.

Correction (11/08/06): An article on Oct. 28, "Israel's scandalous siege of Gaza," gave an incorrect number for the Israelis killed by rockets fired from Gaza. The correct number is nine. The article also misstated that Palestinians in Gaza have been bombed and killed "on a daily basis" since June 25. According to the Palestine Red Crescent Society, 347 Palestinians have been killed in that period in the West Bank and Gaza, but the casualties have not occurred on every day. 



Error (Los Angeles Times, Op-Ed by Henry Siegman, 6/18/06): The death of an entire Palestinian family -- a father and his six children -- on a Gaza beach earlier this month, followed just a few days later by an Israeli missile strike that killed nine more Palestinian civilians, has reopened the controversy ....

[S]ince Israel's disengagement from Gaza last year ... Palestinian civilians have been killed by Israeli artillery and airstrikes virtually on a daily basis.

Correction (7/17/06): A June 18 article on the Mideast conflict stated that a father and his six children were killed in a June 9 Israeli artillery strike on a Gaza beach. A man, his wife and five children in their family died. The article also said that Palestinian civilians have been killed "virtually every day" since Israel's disengagement from Gaza. Statistics from B'Tselem, the Israeli human rights group, show that Palestinian civilians have been killed on fewer than half the days since the disengagement last year.

Fact: The newspaper's correction claims the Palestinians were killed in an "Israeli artillery strike on a Gaza beach." But Israel has denied the explosion was caused by an IDF shell, and even Siegman avoided blaming an incoming Israeli shell. The correction also refers to the number of days in which "Palestinian civilians have been killed." Siegman's Op-Ed, however, referred more specifically to civilians killed by Israeli artillery or airstrikes, something which has happened on only few of the days since Israel's withdrawal from Gaza. Regardless, the correction's claim that Israel has killed Palestinian civilians on "fewer than half the days since the disengagement" is misleadingly imprecise. Based on B'tselem documentation, on fewer than 25 percent of those days were Palestinian civilians killed by Israel.



Error (International Herald Tribune, Ian Fisher and Steven Erlanger, 6/29/06): Two Palestinians, aged 2 and 17, were reported killed Wednesday while playing with an unexploded Israeli shell in the southern town of Khan Yunis.

Correction (7/12/06): An article June 29 on the deaths of two Palestinians in an explosion in the southern Gaza town of Khan Yunis misstated the cause. Palestinians initially blamed an Israeli shell for the blast, but Palestinian security officials and Palestinian journalists later said that the blast appeared to be a Palestinian explosive that went off unintentionally.



Error (Guardian, Patrick Seale, 7/3/06): Qassam rockets being fired from Gaza "have so far not killed anyone..."

Correction: (7/7/2006): We said in error in a column that the homemade rockets launched from northern Gaza into Israel had not so far killed anyone (Anything but negotiation, page 29, July 3). In fact 13 deaths have been recorded, according to various sources.



Error (AFP, 2/8/06): Closed since September 24 under the complete cutting off of the Palestinian territories by Israel, it [the Karni crossing] was reopened on Sunday.

Correction (Updated story, 2/8/06): The crossing had been closed since mid-January after a security alert but it was reopened on Sunday.



Error (San Francisco Chronicle, David Biale, 1/29/06): Israel still controls 60 percent of Palestinian land, much of its water sources and all of its borders.

Correction (2/5/06): In last Sunday's Insight, the story "Barbarians at the gate, or just prgmatists?" misstated the extent of Israel's administration of Gaza's borders. Israel controls all of the borders except Gaza's border with Egypt, which is controlled by the Palestinians.



Error (Boston Herald, Marie Szaniszlo, 12/25/05): After 38 years of occupying the Gaza Strip, Israel pulled out, evacuating some 8,000 Israeli settlers and destroying their homes so that Palestinians could not use them.

Correction (1/15/06): A year-end review article on Dec. 25 about the Israeli pullout from the Gaza Strip included an incomplete explanation of why the Israelis tore down the vacated homes left behind by Jewish settlers. Palestinian officials said they wanted the homes to be torn down as unsuitable for their housing needs. Additionally, some Israeli officials were concerned the Palestinian group Hamas would triumphally overrun the empty houses.

CAMERA: The Palestinian Authority called for the demolition of the homes so that they could be replaced with high-density apartments for Palestinians. See here for more details.



Error (BBC Web site, "In pictures" caption, 11/26/05): For the first time in nearly 40 years, Palestinians took back control of the Rafah border crossing between Gaza and Egypt. (Emphasis added.)

Correction (11/28/05): Palestinians took control of the Rafah border crossing between Gaza and Egypt for the first time. The crossing is a vital gateway to the outside world for Gaza's residents and the strip's economy. (Emphasis added.)



Error (Boston Globe, Thannassis Cambanis, 12/31/2005): Palestinian firms have risen to the occasion, repairing greenhouses sabotaged by departing settlers and by Palestinian looters.

Correction (11/3/2005): Because of a reporting error, a Page One story Monday about greenhouses in former Israeli settlements in the Gaza Strip stated that Israeli settlers sabotaged greenhouses before withdrawing from Gaza in August. The article should have said some settlers dismantled their own greenhouses before leaving, and that Palestinians looted some greenhouses after the Israelis withdrew. A Palestinian official, Mahmoud Abu Samra, asserted to the reporter that Israelis had sabotaged some greenhouses, but he did not provide evidence to substantiate the allegation.



Error (Reuters, Cynthia Johnston, 10/19/05): In October, the Authority broke ground on a project funded by the United Arab Emirates to build apartment towers for poor or homeless people in the coastal strip, which is the most densely populated place on earth and home to 1.4 million people.

Correction (Updated story, 10/23/05): In October, the Authority broke ground on a project funded by the United Arab Emirates to build apartment towers for poor or homeless people in the coastal strip, which is among the most densely populated places on earth and home to 1.4 million people.



Error (Washington Post, Abdallah al Salmi, 10/2/05): With 1.3 million Palestinians living in heavily packed refugee camps, subject to IDF jets and militants’ rockets, the 140-square-mile Strip is not a likely setting for a stable and prosperous state.

Correction (10/13/05): An Oct. 2 Outlook article by Abdallah al Salmi, describing life in Gaza since the Israeli withdrawal, stated incorrectly that there are 1.3 million Palestinians living in Gaza refugee camps. That figure is the estimated number of Palestinians in Gaza, of which 961,000 are registered as refugees with the U.N. Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA). An estimated 471,000 live in refugee camps, according to UNRWA.



Error (Philadelphia Inquirer, 8/12/05): This will restore freedom of movement for Palestinians who have lived hemmed in by fences on three sides and the Mediterranean on the fourth since 1967.

Correction (8/20/05): In an Aug. 12 story on the challenges facing Palestinians in the Gaza Strip, an incorrect date was given for when the Israelis constructed fences to enclose three sides of Gaza. The fences were constructed in 1994.



Error (USA Today, Andrea Stone, 4/19/05): About 8,000 Jewish settlers control 40% of Gaza, a 139-square-mile strip along the Mediterranean Sea that is home to more than 1.3 million Palestinians.

Correction (4/25/05): An article in Tuesday’s editions should have explained that estimates vary on the amount of land controlled by Israel and Jewish settlers in Gaza. When roads, Israeli military installations and temporary security zones are included, the estimate is as high as 40%, according to Palestinian academics Mohammed El-Samhouri and Hazim Abu Shanab. Estimates by Israel’s Foreign Ministry and Peace Now don’t include those areas and range from 15%-25%.



Error (American Journalism Review, Barbara Matusow, June/July 2004): To understand the particular tensions in Gaza, for example, and why Israel is contemplating a pullout, it’s necessary to know that this tiny strip of land is home to 1.2 million Palestinians, while 7,500 Israeli settlers occupy 25 percent of the land and control most of the water resources.

Correction (August/September 2004): In “Caught in the Crossfire” (June/July), Barbara Matusow wrote that Israeli settlers occupy 25 percent of the land in the Gaza Strip and control most of the water resources. According to the Institute of Applied Research in Jerusalem, the Palestinians control 95 percent of the water resources in Gaza. Estimates vary widely when it comes to control of the land, however. A June 2004 report on Gaza by the World Bank states that 15 to 20 percent of the land is occupied by settlements.



Error (Washington Post, John Ward Anderson, 7/23/04): A little more than 8,000 settlers occupy approximately 40 percent of the land in the Gaza Strip. . . .

Correction (7/28/04): A July 23 article misstated the amount of land in the Gaza Strip occupied by Jewish settlers. Although there is disagreement on the exact amount, estimates range from about 12 percent to about 15 percent. When Israeli military installations, roads and security zones are included, estimates range from about 15 percent to about 38 percent.



Error (AP, 2003 photos re-released 6/19/04 with new captions): In Gaza, a fenced-in, poverty stricken territory where only a tiny portion of the 1.3 million residents has a job and where brutal military incursions are a daily fact of life, the militant group Hamas has won wide support for its welfare work, and is asking to have a greater role in running the Gaza Strip once Israel withdraws.

Correction (Revised captions in AP Photo Archives, 7/1/04): In Gaza, a fenced-in, poverty stricken territory where only a tiny portion of the 1.3 million residents has a job and where Israeli military incursions are a daily fact of life, the militant group Hamas has won wide support. Hamas is asking to have a greater role in running the Gaza Strip, should Israel withdraw.