Saturday, February 24, 2018
  Home
RSS Feed
Facebook
Twitter
Search:
Media Analyses
Journalists
Middle East Issues
Christian Issues
Names In The News
CAMERA Authors
Headlines & Photos
Errors & Corrections
 Corrected
 Uncorrected
 Dismal Corrections
Film Reviews
CAMERA Publications
Film Suggestions
Be An Activist
Adopt A Library
History of CAMERA
About CAMERA
Join/Contribute
Contact CAMERA
Contact The Media
Privacy Policy
 
Corrected

Egypt

Error (Times of Israel, Dov Lieber, 7/10/16): Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry made a rare visit to Tel Aviv Sunday …

Correction (7/12/16): Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry made a rare visit to Jerusalem Sunday …



Error (Times of Israel, subheadline, 7/10/16): Trip to Tel Aviv by Sameh Shoukry intended to help Cairo push forward peace initiatives …

Correction (7/12/16): Trip to Jerusalem by Sameh Shoukry intended to help Cairo push forward peace initiatives …



Error (Christian Science Monitor, Global News Blog, Ben Rosen, 7/10/16):

Sameh Shoukry, visiting Israel on behalf of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, is set to meet with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Tel Aviv twice on Sunday, Mr. Netanyahu announced in Jerusalem earlier in the day. …
 
According to the Palestinian news outlet Ma'an, Egyptian sources said Shoukry's visit to Tel Aviv may be in preparation for Netanyahu to visit Cairo to meet with Sisi.


Correction (7/11/16): Sameh Shoukry, visiting Israel on behalf of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, is set to meet with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu twice on Sunday, Mr. Netanyahu announced in Jerusalem earlier in the day. …
 
According to the Palestinian news outlet Ma'an, Egyptian sources said Shoukry's visit to Israel may be in preparation for Netanyahu to visit Cairo to meet with Sisi. The Israeli Foreign Ministry refused to comment on any upcoming trip.
 
[Appended]: Editor's note: An earlier version of this story misstated the locale of the meetings between Shoukry and Netanyahu. They took place in Jerusalem.



Error (Reuters, Graphic, 7/10/15): Israel has blockaded Gaza, placing restrictions on people and goods leaving the enclave and goods entering it, since the Islamist group Hamas won power in Gaza in election in 2006.

Correction (7/13/15):

Israel and Egypt have maintained a blockade of Gaza since Hamas seized power there in 2007, although the extent of their restrictions have varied. Israel tightly restricts the movement of goods and people across its borders with Gaza, while Egypt has largely kept its border crossing at Rafah closed and has destroyed smuggling tunnels between Gaza and its territory.
 
Clarification: Like Israel, Egypt has also maintained a blockade of Gaza since Hamas seized power in 2007. An earlier version of this graphic included charts showing the movement of people between Gaza and Egypt, but did not include a description of this situation in the introduction.



Error (Christian Science Monitor Jerome Slater Op-Ed, 1/7/13): Ban lifted: A truck loaded with building materials drives at the Rafah crossing with Egypt, in the southern Gaza Strip Dec. 30. Israel had banned construction materials for Gaza after Hamas seized control there in 2007.

As part of a November ceasefire agreement with Hamas, Israel has partially lifted its blockade of the Gaza Strip, at least allowing construction materials into the region pummeled by Israeli airstrikes. It's a single, forward step that ends a five-year ban on such materials."

Among other measures, it has refused to allow Gaza a functioning airport, seaport, or commercial crossing on its border with Egypt, radically cutting Gazan trade and commerce with the outside world.



Correction (1/10/13): Ban lifted: A truck loaded with building materials drives at the Rafah crossing with Egypt, in the southern Gaza Strip Dec. 30. Israel had banned construction materials for Gaza's private sector after Hamas seized control there in 2007.

As part of a November ceasefire agreement with Hamas, Israel has partially lifted its blockade of the Gaza Strip, allowing private construction materials into the region pummeled by Israeli airstrikes. It's a single, forward step that ends a five-year ban on such materials."

"Among other measures, it has refused to allow Gaza a functioning airport or seaport, radically cutting Gazan trade and commerce with the outside world. [An earlier version of this paragraph was incorrect. See editor's note at the bottom of this article."

Editor's note: An earlier version of this article, based on reporting from the Associated Press, incorrectly described Israel's lifting of a 2007 ban on construction materials into Gaza. AP has issued a correction saying that the ban applied to materials for Gaza's private sector. Since the Hamas takeover of Gaza in 2007, Israel has allowed humanitarian-related construction materials and materials under UN auspices. Lifting the ban allows private business to ship materials to Gaza. Also, an earlier version incorrectly described Israeli embargo efforts at the Gaza-Egypt border. Israel does not control that border.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Jeffrey Fleishman and Edmund Sanders, 8/6/12): A Sinai militant group, which included at least one extremist from Saudi Arabia, released a video last week claiming responsibility for a June attack along the border that killed one Israeli soldier.

Correction (8/8/12): Israeli border violence: In the Aug. 6 Section A, an article about an attack by militants along Israel's border with Egypt said that an Israeli slain during a previous assault in June was a soldier. The victim was a civilian.



Error (Guardian, Sarah Irving, travel piece, 11/18/11): Israeli border authorities control all routes into the West Bank and Gaza.

Correction (12/15/11): Granted, tourism to Palestine still faces many challenges, not least the Israeli border authorities who control all routes into the West Bank. . . .

This article was amended on 15 December 2011. The original said the Israeli border authorities controlled all routes into the West Bank and Gaza. This has been corrected.



Error (Ha'aretz, Barak Ravid, 8/20/11): Cohen presented Egyptian officials with Defense Minister Ehud Barak's statement, released earlier Saturday, in which Barak expressed regret over the deaths of three Egyptian policemen from Israel Defence Forces fire on Thursday.

Correction (Posted online as of 8/26/11): Cohen presented Egyptian officials with Defense Minister Ehud Barak's statement, released earlier Saturday, in which Barak expressed regret over the deaths of three Egyptian policemen on Thursday.



Error (Ha'aretz, Anshel Pfeffer and Barak Ravid, 8/20/11): Defense Minister Ehud Barak said on Saturday that Israel regrets the death of three Egyptian policemen who were killed by Israel Defence Forces soldiers on Thursday.

Correction (Posted online as of 8/26/11): Defense Minister Ehud Barak said on Saturday that Israel regrets the deaths of three Egyptian policemen who were killed on Thursday.



Error (Ha'aretz, subheadline, 8/20/11): Defense Minister Ehud Barak says that Israel regrets the deaths of Egyptian policemen who were killed by IDF fire during Thursday's terror attacks near Eilat

Correction (Posted online as of 8/26/11): Defense Minister Ehud Barak said on Saturday that Israel regrets the deaths of three Egyptian policemen who were killed during Thursday's terror attacks near Eilat



Error (Associated Press, Paul Garwood, 2/3/05): Strong ties with the United States, the source of more than $2 billion worth of military aid and civil aid since Egypt signed its 1979 peace treaty with Israel. . .

Correction (Updated story, 2/3/05): Strong ties with the United States, the source of more than $2 billion per year worth of military and civil aid since Egypt signed its 1979 peace treaty with Israel. . .