Saturday, February 17, 2018
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Corrected

Demographics

Error (Independent, Robert Fisk, 4/25/14): Since Mr Netanyahu has been demanding that Mr Abbas accept -- even before the latter's renewed love affair with Hamas -- that Israel was a "Jewish state" (thus deleting its tens of thousands of Israeli Arab citizens), no "recognition of Israel" without its Jewish definition would be of any use to him.

Correction (Online as of 4/29/14): Since Mr Netanyahu has been demanding that Mr Abbas accept -- even before the latter's renewed love affair with Hamas -- that Israel was a "Jewish state" (thus deleting its million and more Israeli Arab citizens), no "recognition of Israel" without its Jewish definition would be of any use to him.



Error (Washington Post, Sally Quinn, 12/14/13): [Ari] Shavit is most worried about the gradual disappearance of the Christian community in Israel and Palestine.

Correction (12/28/13 print edition): Sally Quinn’s On Faith column in the Dec. 14 Metro section incorrectly referred to the “gradual disappearance of the Christian community” in Israel. According to Israel’s Central Bureau of Statistics, that country’s Christian population has grown over the past year and the past decade.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Laura King, 3/11/06): An estimated 3.2 million Palestinians live in the West Bank.

Correction (3/27/06): West Bank: An article in the March 11 Section A incorrectly reported the Palestinian population of the West Bank as 3.2 million. The population numbers are heavily disputed, but the most generally accepted estimate is 2.3 million.



Error (Reuters, Cynthia Johnston, 10/19/05): In October, the Authority broke ground on a project funded by the United Arab Emirates to build apartment towers for poor or homeless people in the coastal strip, which is the most densely populated place on earth and home to 1.4 million people.

Correction (Updated story, 10/23/05): In October, the Authority broke ground on a project funded by the United Arab Emirates to build apartment towers for poor or homeless people in the coastal strip, which is among the most densely populated places on earth and home to 1.4 million people.



Error (Philadelphia Inquirer, Carol Rosenberg, 11/11/04): He shared the 1994 Nobel Peace Prize ... a prize Israel later came to view as soaked in blood after two violent Palestinian uprisings .... at the end of his life, Mr. Arafat was once again seen in wide portions of the West as an exremist cast as an obstacle to coexistence between 4.4 million Arabs and 4.7 million Jews who live in the land today controlled by Israel.

Correction (2/9/05): An obituary of Yasir Arafat published in The Inquirer on Nov. 11 gave an incorrect breakdown of the population of land controlled by Israel. The 2004 CIA Factbook indicates that more than 5.3 million Jews and more than 4.4 million non-Jews live in Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. The same obituary incorrectly said that Arafat received the 1994 Nobel Peace Prize after two Palestinian uprisings; the second uprising occurred after he had received the prize.

CAMERA: A number of errors in the Rosenberg story were left uncorrected. For details click here.



Error (San Diego Union-Tribune, Khalid Turaani, 11/28/04): The dubious distinction of being the world’s “most densely populated area” teeters back and forth each year between camps like Rafah and Jabaliya, each with populations of around 80,000 people per square mile.

Correction (1/30/05): Khalid Turani's commentary, “Enduring on the other side of the wall,” in the Nov. 28 Insight section erred in stating that the Rafah and Jabaliya Palestinian refugee camps are the world's most densely populated places. Hong Kong’s Kowloon district, with its many high-rise apartment buildings, has a higher population density.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Don Heckman, 12/13/02): Also represented are lesser-known but equally compelling artists such as Yat Kha (Tuva), Gigi (Ethiopia), Amal Murkus (Palestine) and Sabah Habas Mustapha (Indonesia).

Correction (12/14/02): Singer’s citizenship–In Friday’s Calendar, an article on the year’s best world-music CDs said Amal Murkus is from Palestine. The singer is actually an Arab who is a citizen of Israel.



Error (New York Times , Week in Review chart, 3/3/02): Chart indicates that Israel’s population of those under five years old is 264,000.

Correction (3/17/02): A chart on March 3 showing comparative statistics for Israel and the West Bank and the Gaza Strip misstated the population of children under 5 in Israel. It is 614,000, not 264,000.



Error (Reuters AlertNet, Country Profile for Israel): Illiteracy: 95.7 percent (1998)

Correction (Correction (now posted on web site)): Illiteracy: 4.3 percent (1998)