Tuesday, February 20, 2018
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Corrected

Geography

Error (National Geographic, Christine Blau, 9/8/17): Palestine offers plenty of more enjoyable things to visit, like the exceptional stepped landscape of Battir covered in olive trees and grape vines, the renowned food scene of Nablus, or the winding alleyways of the oldest town in history, Jericho.

Correction (9/13/17): Some tourists intend to visit the wall, while others just pass by on the way to more enjoyable places to visit, like the exceptional stepped landscape of Battir covered in olive trees and grape vines, the renowned food scene of Nablus, or the winding alleyways of the oldest town in history, Jericho.



Error (Al Jazeera English, Shafik Mandhai, 8/20/17): Based in the city of northern occupied Palestine, Elbit produces military and civilian-use equipment, including drones, aircraft, weapon control systems, and artillery.

Correction (8/29/17): Based in the city of Haifa, Elbit produces military and civilian-use equipment, including drones, aircraft, weapon control systems, and artillery.



Error (New York Times, Journeys, Seventy Years of the State of Israel): Drive south to meet Major Tal Shamir for a tour of the settlements surrounding the Gaza Strip.

Correction (Online as of 8/1/17): Drive south to meet Major Tal Shamir for a tour of the communities surrounding the Gaza Strip.



Error (DPA/AP Images captions, 3/1/17): An underground room in the Galilee Medical Center in Naharija [sic], Israel, 1 March 2017. Injured Syrians wait for their nex [sic] treatment in the hospital which is partially under ground and bomb-proof due to the close-by Libyan border. Photo by Stefanie J'rkel/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

Correction (3/6/17): The border mentioned in the second sentence in the pictures sent to you on 03 March 2017 via FTP was wrongly identified as Libyan. The correct name of the border is Lebanese rpt. Lebanese. We will resend the picture with the correct version of the caption. We apologize for any inconvenience. With kind regards dpa-i desk. . .



Error (National Geographic, Melody Rowell, 12/8/16): A few years ago, Balilty was on assignment in Yeruham, Israel, photographing a factory that produced concrete bricks for the barrier between Israel and Palestine.

Correction (12/15/16): A previous version of this article incorrectly referred to a barrier between Israel and Palestine. The barrier is between Israel and the West Bank.



Error (Washington Post, Elaine Woo, obituary, 9/23/14): In 1958 [Gerald] Larue joined USC's faculty as a professor of biblical history and archaeology. In the 1960s he took part in digs in Egypt, Palestine and other parts of the Middle East, returning with artifacts preserved in a USC archaeological collection.

Correction (9/25/14): The Sept. 23 obituary for religious scholar Gerald A. Larue inaccurately reported that he participated in archaeological digs in Egypt, Palestine and other parts of the Middle East. He took part in digs in Egypt, Israel and the West Bank, not Palestine.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Elaine Woo, obituary, 9/22/14): In 1958 [Gerald] Larue joined USC's faculty as a professor of biblical history and archaeology. In the 1960s he took part in digs in Egypt, Palestine and other parts of the Middle East, returning with artifacts preserved in a USC archaeological collection.

Correction (9/24/14): Gerald A. Larue: In the Sept. 22 LATExtra section, the obituary of USC religious scholar Gerald A. Larue referred to archaeological digs in Palestine. The digs occurred in Israel and the West Bank.



Error (i24 News, Lily Galili, 6/30/14): They've been trying for decades to "settle in the hearts of all Israelis" and erase the distinction between those living inside the Green Line -- Israel's internationally recognized border -- and those beyond and to convey that life in the settlements is as normal as anywhere inside Israel.

Correction (6/30/14): They've been trying for decades to "settle in the hearts of all Israelis," and erase the distinction between those living inside the Green Line (the 1949 Israel–Jordan demarcation line) and those beyond, and to convey that life in the settlements is as normal as anywhere inside Israel.



Error (Independent, Jack Simpson, 6/15/14 ): The students -- two are reported to be 16 and the third 19 -- are said to have disappeared on their journey back to their Israeli settlement from school.

Correction (Online 6/16/14): The students -- two are said to be 16 and the third 19 -- are said to have disappeared close to the Alon Shvut settlement on their journey back home from school.



Error (The Economist, book review, 5/3/14): One of the most fanatical settlements, Kochav Yair, is named after [pre-state Lehi leader Avrahim "Yair" Stern].

Correction (5/8/14): In an earlier version of this article we mistakenly identified Kochav Yair as a fanatical settlement named after Stern. This was incorrect. Kochav Yair is neither a settlement nor fanatical; it is on the Israeli side of the "green line". This was changed on May 8th 2014.



Error (Haaretz, photo caption, 4/25/14): A Palestinian woman at the West Bank separation barrier near the Israeli city of Modi'in.

Correction (4/28/14): The caption accompanying an article by Peter Beinart's ("A simple lesson for Israel," April 25) incorrectly identified the Israeli city seen in the background of the West Bank separation barrier. The city in question is Modi'in Ilit.



Error (New York Times, Lindsay Crouse, 12/19/13): And the Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, included in a message to Secretary of State John Kerry a YouTube video of Mr. Assaf singing longingly about cities in Israel that were once Palestinian.

 
Mr. Assaf group up in the Khan Younis refugee camp in Gaza, an area that often has shortages of water, gas and electricity because of restrictions imposed by Israel.


Correction (12/31/13): An article on Dec. 19 about Mohammed Assaf, a Palestinian singer from Gaza who has become a star in the Arab world after winning the “Arab Idol” competition, referred incorrectly to cities in Israel Mr. Assaf sings about. While they had largely Arab populations before Israel became a state in 1948, they were not “Palestinian” in the sense of being part of a Palestinian political entity. The article also referred incorrectly to shortages of water, gas and electricity in Gaza. While Israel places restrictions on some goods coming into Gaza, and many Palestinians blame Israel for shortages, they were worsened by Egypt’s closing of smuggling tunnels and by a tax dispute between the militant Hamas faction, which governs Gaza, and the Palestinian Authority. The article also referred incorrectly to Mr. Assaf’s travels to Cairo for “Arab Idol” auditions. The Sinai Desert is part of Egypt; he rode for hours through the Sinai from the border with Egypt, not to the border.



Error (Los Angeles Times, news story with no byline, 10/9/12): Originally from Quneitra in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, [Syrian rebel fighter Hanadi] grew up in the poor Damascus neighborhood of Asali.

Correction (10/12/12): Syrian fighter: An article In the Oct. 9 Section A about a female Syrian rebel fighter said that she was originally from Quneitra in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights. Quneitra, in the Golan Heights, was captured by Israel in the 1967 war, but has been back in Syrian hands since 1974.



Error (Guardian, Sarah Irving, travel piece, 11/18/11): Israeli border authorities control all routes into the West Bank and Gaza.

Correction (12/15/11): Granted, tourism to Palestine still faces many challenges, not least the Israeli border authorities who control all routes into the West Bank. . . .

This article was amended on 15 December 2011. The original said the Israeli border authorities controlled all routes into the West Bank and Gaza. This has been corrected.



Error (USA Today, 5/23/11): Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu had rejected the idea of basing Israel’s western border on the armistice lines that have existed since the end of the Six-Day War in 1967, and have yet to be resolved.

Correction (5/27/11): A story Monday on President Obama's speech on Israel-Palestinian peace talks misstated the location of the armistice line between Israel and the West Bank. It is along eastern Israel.



Error (USA Today, Michele Chabin, 9/30/10): Israel encouraged Jews to move to the West Bank. Religious Jews saw it as a divine right of the Jewish people to live in land that was once part of ancient Israel, where God first spoke to the patriarch Abraham. The military wanted settlers to create a buffer zone between Israel and its enemies.

Correction (10/7/10): A story Sept. 30 about Israeli settlements gave an incorrect location for where the Bible says God first spoke to Abraham. It was in Mesopotamia.



Error (Boston Globe, AP, 1/12/10): The [planned fence on the Israeli-Egyptian border] would come in addition to a massive fence that surrounds the Hamas-controlled Gaza frontier with the West Bank, biting into chunks of the territory as it runs.

Correction (1/13/10): Because of an editing error, the Globe version of an Associated Press story on yesterday’s World pages about Israel’s plan to build two fences along its southern border with Egypt mischaracterized the project. The story should have stated the structure would be in addition to a massive fence surrounding the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip, as well as a separation barrier that snakes along parts of Israel’s more than 400-mile frontier with the West Bank.



Error (AP, Jerry Harkavy, 6/29/09): The 147 [Seeds of Peace] campers at the first of this summer's two sessions are from Afghanistan, Egypt, India, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine and the United States.

Correction (Updated story 6/29/09): The 147 campers at the first of this summer's two sessions are from Afghanistan, Egypt, India, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, the West Bank and the United States.



Error (Washington Post, Howard Schneider, 6/26/09): The plans were set: boost the guard near Rachel's Tomb and other sites Israelis visit, guard against possible snipers shooting at the Jewish settlement of Gilo, put Palestinian intelligence agents on overtime to keep in touch with sources, and call in political party leaders to discourage incitement.

Correction (Washiington Post, 7/16/09): A June 26 A-section article referred to Gilo as a Jewish settlement. It is a Jewish neighborhood built on land captured in the 1967 Arab-Israeli War and annexed to Israel as part of Jerusalem's expanded municipal boundaries. The United Nations has not acknowledged the annexation.



Error (BBC Web site, 1/21/09): Hamas supporters claim that many more Israelis died in the three weeks of the war than Tel Aviv's official count of only 13 dead.

Correction (2/27/09): Hamas supporters claim that many more Israelis died in the three weeks of the war than Israel's official count of only 13 dead.



Error (Washington Post, Sudarsan Raghavan and Islam Abdel Kareem, 12/29/08): "The leaders of Israel and the leaders of Hamas are to blame. This is the reality," said Taha Hussein, 43, from the West Bank town of Nazareth. "Both sides are wrong."

Correction (12/31/08): A Dec. 29 Page One article incorrectly described Nazareth as part of the West Bank. It is an Israeli town north of the West Bank.



Error (Washington Times, Mel Frykberg of the Middle East Times, 9/11/08): Syria's regional proxy to the north of the Jewish state, Hezbollah, stated that even in the event that Lebanon's Shebaa Farms are returned, the resistance organization would continue to challenge Israel militarily.

Correction (9/16/08): An article from the Middle East Times in Thursday's editions incorrectly described Lake Kinneret, also known as the Sea of Galilee. The lake is in Israel bordering the Golan Heights. The article also incorrectly characterized the Israeli-occupied Shebaa Farms area, which is disputed between Syria and Lebanon.

Fact: The United Nations has certified that Shebaa Farms is Syrian. Syria allows Lebanon to maintain that it is Lebanese, to provide a pretext for Hezbollah's continued existence despite Israel's full withdrawal from Lebanese territory.



Error (Washington Times, Mel Frykberg of the Middle East Times, 9/11/08): . . . the main sticking point for peace will be Israel's lack of enthusiasm for giving up its occupation of Syria's Golan Heights, which provides the thirsty country with access to the waters of Syria's Lake Kinneret.

Correction (9/16/08): An article from the Middle East Times in Thursday's editions incorrectly described Lake Kinneret, also known as the Sea of Galilee. The lake is in Israel bordering the Golan Heights. The article also inaccurately characterized the Israeli-occupied Shebaa Farms area, which is disputed between Syria and Lebanon.



Error (Wall Street Journal, Heading for World Watch; World Watch; 7/10/08): Palestine. . .[Israeli raids] "undermine grossly our efforts aimed at rebuilding our capacity and reestablishing law and order," Falam Fayyad said at a news conference he held Wednesday in the West Bank city of Ramallah with visiting Italian Foreign Minister Franco Frattini.

Correction (7/11/08): Salam Fayyad is the prime minister of the Palestinian Authority. An item in Thursday's World Watch column incorrectly gave his name as Falam Fayyad and indicated he was prime minister of Palestine.



Error (BBC Web site article, 1/28/08): Israel began tightening its blockade of the Gaza Strip after an increase in rocket attacks by militants targeting its settlements near the border. [emphasis added]

Correction (2/2008): Israel began tightening its blockade of the Gaza Strip after an increase in rocket attacks by militants targeting its communities near the border. [emphasis added]



Error (Los Angeles Times, Rone Tempest, 8/2/06): Family members in Beirut are hopeful that Israel will release [Samir] Kuntar, who is serving multiple life sentences for murder and terrorism in Hadarim Prison for his role in the 1979 raid on a Jewish settlement that left four people dead, including a 4-year-old girl.

Correction (8/11/06): Prisoners in Israel: An Aug. 2 article in Section A about Arabs in Israeli custody identified Nahariya as a Jewish settlement. It is a town in northern Israel.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Arden Reed, 12/11/05): Fifty-three artists and art groups participated, some from Western Europe or the New World, but most from the old Ottoman Empire or environs: Croatia Albania, Kazakhstan, Iran, Israel, Palestine, Romania.

Correction (12/23/05): Istanbul Biennial -- An article in the Dec. 11 Calendar section about an international art exhibition included Palestine in a list of nations from which artists had contributed works. It should have said the Palestinian territories.



Error (AFP, 6/10/05): The compound which houses Al-Aqsa, the third holiest site in Judaism, also contains the Western Wall, the most sacred site in Judaism.

Correction (Updated story, 6/10/05): The compound which houses Al-Aqsa, the third holiest site in Islam, also contains the Western Wall, the most sacred site in Judaism.

Fact: Left uncorrected is the false statement that the Western Wall is the most sacred site in Judaism. The Temple Mount is the most sacred site.

Error (AP, 5/23/05): The statement by Bishop M. Thomas Shaw clears the way for a joint Jewish-Episcopal trip to Israel and Palestine this winter.

Correction (Updated story, 5/23/05): The statement by Bishop M. Thomas clears the way for a joint Jewish-Episcopal trip to Israel and the Palestinian territories late this year or early next year.



Error (Associated Press Worldstream, Mark Lavie, 4/28/05): The main focus of tension in the city is a holy site revered by both Christians and Muslims - the traditional burial site of the biblical Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and three of their wives.

Correction (Updated story, 4/28/05): The main focus of tension in the city is a holy site revered by both Jews and Muslims - the traditional burial site of the biblical Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and three of their wives.



Error (USA Today, Richard Benedetto, 4/12/05): The future expansion [of Maale Adumim] would cut the West Bank in two and seal off East Jerusalem from the West Bank.

Correction (4/17/05): Israel's planned expansion of the Maale Adumim settlement near Jerusalem would separate Palestinian-populated areas. It would not split the West Bank in two, as a story Tuesday incorrectly stated.



Error (International Herald Tribune, Alan Cowell, 2/28/05): It broke a truce between Israelis and Palestinians that was declared on Feb. 8, and put President Mahmoud Abbas of Palestine under strong pressure to demonstrate his ability to rein in militants prepared to sabotage peace efforts with bloody attacks on civilians inside Israel.

Correction (3/2/05): Because of an editing error, a front-page article Monday about the suicide bombing in Tel Aviv misidentified Mahmoud Abbas as the president of Palestine. He is president of the Palestinian Authority.



Error (USA Today, Andrea Stone, 2/8/05): Arafat had dreamed of spending eternity on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem.

Correction (2/9/05): The late Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat said he wanted to be interred in Jerusalem on what Muslims call the Noble Sanctuary and Jews call the Temple Mount. A story Tuesday misstated his wishes.



Error (USA Today, Barbara Slavin, 10/7/04): The flap came as Israel pursued its biggest military offensive in Gaza, in response to rocket attacks on Israeli settlements.

Correction (10/12/04): A story in Thursday's editions should have said that an Israeli offensive in Gaza was in response to Palestinian rocket attacks within Israel's pre-1967 borders as well as on Israeli settlements.



Error (Los Angeles Times, H.G. Reza and Christine Hanley, 9/26/04): The family, which, according to court documents, has ties to Palestine and Jordan, diverted some of the cash to Israel and other Middle East countries, sources close to the investigtaion said.

Correction (9/29/04): Bail bonds investigation–An article in the California section Sunday about the arrest of American Liberty Bail Bonds owner Adnan “Dan” Yousef and members of his family reported that they had ties to Palestine. The reference should have been to the Palestinian territories.



Error (BBC News Web site, 3/22/04): Hezbollah says the Shebaa Farms area is Lebanese territory, but Israel says the farms are on the Syrian side of the border and so are part of the Golan Heights, which it has occupied since 1967.

Correction (Posted as of 3/25/04): Hezbollah says the Shebaa Farms area is Lebanese territory, but Israel, backed by the UN, says the farms are on the Syrian side of the border and so are part of the Golan Heights, which it has occupied since 1967.



Error (NPR, Peter Kenyon, 2/28/04): Earlier, two other Palestinian armed factions claimed responsibility for a shooting attack that killed two Jewish settlers, a young husband and wife near the settlement of Meitar. The couple is survived by a two-year-old daughter.

Correction (3/13/04): We have one correction to make. In a newscast report on Saturday, February 28th, about an attack on Jewish settlers, we referred to the incident occurring near the settlement of Meitar. Meitar is not a settlement.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Calendar, 1/8/04): Of the 56 films under consideration to be best foreign language film nominees, 52 will be screened at the 12-day event, including “Osama” (Afghanistan), “Divine Intervention” (Palestine). . .

Correction (1/13/04): Palestinian film–Articles about Palm Springs International Film Festival that ran in Calendar on Dec. 20 and Jan. 8 referred to the movie “Divine Intervention” as coming from Palestine. They should have said the Palestinian territories.



Error (Philadelphia Inquirer, AP article, Mark Fritz, August 23, 2003): [Jericho] is the most revered biblical site in Jordan, yet only a trickle of tourists wander through the church in which Moses himself is buried.

Correction (September 6, 2003): An Associated Press article in the Aug. 23 Inquirer erred in stating the location of Jericho and the burial place of Moses. Jericho is in the West Bank and the exact location of Moses' burial is unknown.



Error (LA Weekly, Nancy Updike, 7/18-24/03): This barrier–which is a fence at some points and a wall at others–is not being built on the Green Line (the only internationally recognized border of Israel). . .

Correction (8/8-14/03): Nancy Updike’s story on the Israeli security barrier (“Fences Make Bad Neighbors,” July 18-24) contained an error. The Green Line is an armistice demarcation, not a border. Israel has internationally recognized borders with Egypt, Jordan and Lebanon.



Error (Boston Globe, 7/14/03): The refugees and many other Palestinians publicly say there can be no peace with Israel until Tel Aviv recognizes the refugees’ right to return.

Correction (7/17/03): Because of an editing error, a story on a Palestinian protest in Monday’s World pages incorrectly suggested that Tel Aviv is the capital of Israel. The capital is Jerusalem.



Error (ABC World News Tonight, Peter Jennings, 4/24/03): In the Israeli- occupied Palestinian territories today, a Palestinian suicide bomber killed an Israeli security guard and injured 14 other people. He blew himself up at a train station during the morning rush hour. This is the first suicide attack in nearly a month.

Correction (4/25/03): Speaking of the violence, we made a mistake last night on our broadcast. Yesterday's suicide attack by a Palestinian on Israelis took place in Israel itself, very near but not in the occupied territories, as we said.



Error (Guardian, Sarah Crown, 3/18/03): British Airways today announced that all its flights to Israel’s capital, Tel Aviv, will be cancelled from Thursday, and will remain suspended until further notice.

Correction (Posted on Web site as of 3/21/03): British Airways today announced that all its flights to Tel Aviv, Israel, will be cancelled from Thursday, and will remain suspended until further notice.



Error (Slate, David Plotz, 1/22/03): In 1966, the British finally surrendered Aden, and the remaining Jews left with them, moving mostly to Palestine or Great Britain.

Correction (1/23/03): In 1966, the British finally surrendered Aden, and the remaining Jews left with them, moving mostly to Israel or Great Britain.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Don Heckman, 12/13/02): Also represented are lesser-known but equally compelling artists such as Yat Kha (Tuva), Gigi (Ethiopia), Amal Murkus (Palestine) and Sabah Habas Mustapha (Indonesia).

Correction (12/14/02): Singer’s citizenship–In Friday’s Calendar, an article on the year’s best world-music CDs said Amal Murkus is from Palestine. The singer is actually an Arab who is a citizen of Israel.



Error (New York Times, Ian Fisher, 11/21/02): But Turkish news reports quote investigators there as saying that Mr. Foqara confessed to planning to turn the plane around and crash it into Tel Aviv, the capital of Israel.

Correction (11/22/02): An article yesterday about a man accused of having tried to hijack an El Al plane en route to Istanbul from Tel Aviv referred incorrectly to Tel Aviv. It is not the capital of Israel; Jerusalem is.



Error (WBUR, NPR affiliate in Boston, "The Connection," Dick Gordon, 9/19/02): Today, in Tel Aviv, in the center of Israel’s capital in front of a synagogue in the middle of the day–five dead, fifteen injured.

Correction (posted later on web site): There is an error in the opening moments of this program. Dick Gordon says, “Today, in Tel Aviv, in the center of Israel’s capital in front of a synagogue in the middle of the day – five dead, fifteen injured.” The capital of Israel is Jerusalem. We regret the error.



Error (New York Times, John Kifner, 5/29/02): This afternoon the army was digging a huge ditch enclosed by barbed wire coils piled high to form a barrier between Bethlehem and Gilo, a nearby East Jerusalem neighborhood, where a sprawling Jewish area has been built on land seized after the war of 1967.

Correction (6/5/02): An article last Wednesday about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict misstated the location of Gilo, a Jewish neighborhood built on land captured by Israel in the 1967 Middle East war. It is in southern Jerusalem, not East Jerusalem.



Error (Los Angeles Times, editorial, 12/14/01): Leaders in Jordan, Egypt and Europe are rightly furious with Arafat for not quelling violence that threatens to spread outside Palestine and Israel. . .

Correction (12/15/01): Mideast–An editorial Friday mistakenly referred to Palestine. It should have said Palestinian territories.



Error (St. Petersburg Times, Bill Maxwell, 6/24/01, and Patriot Ledger of Quincy, Mass., 7/2/01): I came to understand the real meaning of the terms "occupation" and "settlers" in the Israeli and Palestinian conflict two years ago as I looked out the window of my room at the Marriott Hotel in Nazareth, a northern city in the West Bank.

Correction (St. Petersburg Times, 6/28/01: Patriot Ledger, 7/4/01): (St. Petersburg Times, 6/28/01): In his Sunday column, Bill Maxwell incorrectly referred to Nazareth as "a northern city in the West Bank." Nazareth is within Israel’s 1948 borders and is not part of any "occupied" territory.

(Patriot Ledger, 7/4/01): A column by Bill Maxwell of the St. Petersburg Times, published on this page Monday, referred to Nazareth as being on the West Bank. Nazareth is in Israel proper.