Friday, February 23, 2018
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Corrected

BDS

Error (Jerusalem Post, Daniel Roth, 1/23/18): The Zioness Movement issued a statement via social media on Monday after it was slammed by pro-Palestinian journalist Ali Abunimah, who claimed the group was a spurious front designed to promote the interests of the Israeli government.

Correction (1/24/18): The Zioness Movement issued a statement via social media on Monday after it was slammed by pro-Palestinian activist writer Ali Abunimah, who claimed the group was a spurious front designed to promote the interests of the Israeli government.



Error (AP, 10/26/17): Palestinians in the West Bank do not have citizenship or the right to vote.

[…]

The BDS movement advocates boycotts, divestment and sanctions against Israel in what supporters say is a nonviolent way to promote the Palestinian struggle for independence. Erdan says most of its activists aim to delegitimize and destroy Israel …



Correction (Updated story, 10/26/17): …Palestinians living in the West Bank, which Israel captured in the 1967 Middle East war, do not have Israeli citizenship or the right to vote in Israeli elections.

[...]

The boycott movement, also called the BDS movement, advocates boycotts, divestment and sanctions against Israel in what supporters say is a nonviolent way to promote the Palestinian cause. …

Israel says the campaign, with its call for a return of Palestinian refugees to lost land inside what is now Israel, goes beyond the West Bank occupation and masks a deeper aim of destroying the entire country.



Error (Haaretz, 10/23/17): The second case took place this weekend in Dickinson, Texas, where local residents had to sign a form stating that they don't boycott Israel and the settlements, in order to receive aid relief following Hurricane Harvey.

Correction (10/23/17, online): The second case took place this weekend in Dickinson, Texas, where local residents had to sign a form stating that they don't boycott Israel, in order to receive aid relief following Hurricane Harvey. …

 
This article was amended on October 23, 2017, to clarify that residents of Dickinson, TX, were not asked to declare that they do not boycott Israeli settlements in exchange for Hurricane Harvey relief. Rather, they were asked to declare that they do not and will not boycott Israel.



Error (Haaretz, photo caption, 10/13/17): Israel supporters separated by a police barrier from BDS activists at a New York parade.

Correction (10/16/17): The caption accompanying an Associated Press photograph of a pro-Israel rally in New York ("Exorcising an imaginary BDS demon," by David Rosenberg, October 13) incorrectly identified some of the participants as pro-BDS activists.



Error (Los Angeles Times, editorial, 7/8/17): Refusing entry to the country's critics isn't unprecedented; Israel has turned away travelers for political reasons in the past, including denying a visa this year to a researcher from Human Rights Watch.

Correction (7/19/17): Refusing entry to the country’s critics isn’t unprecedented; Israel has turned away travelers for political reasons in the past, including denying a visa earlier this year to a researcher from Human Rights Watch. (That decision was reversed two months later and he was granted a year-long work visa in April.) …

This editorial was updated to note that Human Rights Watch researcher Omar Shakir was granted a year-long work visa in April.



Error (Newsweek, Jack Moore, 7/12/17): Many premier bands and music acts have played shows in Israel such as Britney Spears but other have decided to cancel their shows, such as Stevie Wonder and Lauryn Hill.

Correction (7/14/17): Many premier bands and music acts have played shows in Israel such as the Rolling Stones and Britney Spears but others have decided to cancel their shows, such as Lauryn Hill.

 
This article originally stated that Stevie Wonder cancelled a show in Israel, he in fact cancelled a performance at a 2012 Los Angeles fundraiser for an organization supporting the Israeli military.



Error (Times of Israel, Sue Surkes, 7/12/17): But the cultural boycott campaign against Israel has had mixed success. Stevie Wonder, Carlos Santana and Lauryn Hill have scrapped shows, but Santana then played in Israel last summer and plenty of other major names have performed in recent years, among them Paul McCartney, the Rolling Stones, Elton John, Lady Gaga, Bon Jovi and Britney Spears. The iconic US rock band Guns N’ Roses is due to perform on July 15.

Correction (7/12/17): The cultural boycott campaign against Israel has had mixed success. Stevie Wonder backed out of a Friends of the IDF benefit concert in Los Angeles, and Lauryn Hill scrapped an Israel show, but numerous major names have performed in Israel in recent years, among them Paul McCartney, the Rolling Stones, Santana, Elton John, Lady Gaga, Bon Jovi and Britney Spears. The iconic US rock band Guns N’ Roses is due to perform on July 15.



Error (Times of Israel, 6/4/14): Some artists have bowed to boycott pressure: US singer Lenny Kravitz cancelled a Tel Aviv concert in October after being petitioned by activists, citing a scheduling conflict.

Correction (6/9/14): Some artists have bowed to boycott pressure.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Kate Linthicum, 4/13/14): [Rapper Tamer Nafar] was channeling Scarlett Johansson for a video sketch skewering the actress for serving as a spokeswoman for SodaStream, a company boycotted by Palestinian activists because it is headquartered in an Israeli settlement in the West Bank.

Correction (4/24/14): Tamer Nafar: A profile of Palestinian rapper Tamer Nafar in the April 13 Arts and Books section said that SodaStream, a company that manufactures beverage carbonation machine, was headquartered in an Israeli settlement in the West Bank. The company has a factory in the West Bank but is headquartered in Lod, Israel.



Error (Toronto Star, Raveena Aulakh, 5/9/13): Celebrities from around the world have refused to perform in Israel in recent years as part of an effort to promote the Palestinian cause, including musicians Elvis Costello and Stevie Wonder, and Hollywood actors Bruce Willis and Meg Ryan.

Correction (5/24/13): A previous version of this article incorrectly stated that Meg Ryan refused to perform in Israel. In fact, Ryan has never boycotted Israel. A previous version also said Stevie Wonder refused to perform in Israel. In fact, Wonder cancelled a planned performance at a Los Angeles fundraising concert sponsored by the Friends of the Israel Defence Forces. He then said he would make a donation to organizations that support Israeli and Palestinian children with disabilities.



Error (Toronto Star, Raveena Aulakh, 5/8/13): Celebrities from around the world have refused to perform in Israel in recent years as part of an effort to promote the Palestinian cause, including musicians Elvis Costello and Stevie Wonder, and Hollywood actors Bruce Willis and Meg Ryan.

Correction (5/15/13): A May 9 article about physicist Stephen Hawking’s refusal to attend an Israeli conference in a show of support for a pro-Palestinian boycott stated that actor Bruce Willis is among celebrities around the world who have refused to perform in Israel in recent years in support of the Palestinian cause. In fact, Willis has never boycotted Israel.