Thursday, February 22, 2018
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Corrected

U.N. Resolutions

Error (NPR, Tom Gjelten, 12/9/17): Like other Israeli leaders, Barkat rejects U.N. Security Resolution 242, which calls for the withdrawal of Israeli forces from territories occupied during the 1967 war, including East Jerusalem.

Correction (12/11/17): Like other Israeli leaders, Barkat rejects U.N Security Resolution 242, which calls for the withdrawal of Israeli forces from territories occupied during the 1967 war. While those territories include East Jerusalem, the resolution does not list the territories or specifically say forces must be withdrawn from all of them. …

 
A reference to U.N. Security Resolution 242 has been edited to make clear that while it calls for the withdrawal of Israeli forces from "territories occupied" during the 1967 war, the resolution does not list the territories or specifically say forces must be withdrawn from all of them.



Error (AP, Cara Anna, 8/26/15): In a move likely to upset Israel's government, the Palestinians and the Vatican are seeking to raise their flags at U.N. headquarters – just in time for Pope Francis' visit next month.

Correction (8/26/15): In a move likely to upset Israel's government, the Palestinians are seeking to raise their flag, along with the Vatican flag, at U.N. headquarters -- just in time for Pope Francis' visit next month.

 
While the Vatican's mission to the U.N. earlier expressed support for the idea, it circulated a letter this week distancing itself from the draft, asking the Palestinian mission to "kindly to remove in its draft resolution any reference to the 'Holy See' and any generic reference 'on behalf of the Observer States.'"
 
The Holy See's mission did not comment Wednesday. . . .
 
This story has been corrected to reflect that the Vatican's mission to the U.N. this week sent a letter distancing itself from the draft.



Error (Associated Press, Cara Anna and Fares Akram, 6/2/15): The Palestinian Return Center this week was granted consultative status at the United Nations, prompting Israel's U.N. mission to protest that the organization is associated with Hamas and "promotes anti-Israel propaganda." . . .

 
On Tuesday, Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh's office announced that Haniyeh had called the NGO's leader, Majed al-Zeer, and congratulated him on its new U.N. status.


Correction (7/21/15): In a June 2 story about an organization called the Palestinian Return Center, the Associated Press reported erroneously that the group was granted consultative status at the United Nations. The move was a recommendation for consultative status, not the final decision, which came Monday when its accreditation was approved.
 
A corrected version of the story is below: . . .
 
The Palestinian Return Center this week was recommended for consultative status at the United Nations, prompting Israel's U.N. mission to protest that the organization is associated with Hamas and "promotes anti-Israel propaganda." . . .
 
On Tuesday, Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh's office announced that Haniyeh had called the NGO's leader Majed al-Zeer, and congratulated him on its recommended status.



Error (Jerusalem Post, 5/23/15): Both John Paul II and his successor Benedict XVI reiterated calls for "justice" for the Palestinians and respect for UN Resolution 242, which calls for Israeli withdrawal to pre-1967 lines.

Correction (Online as of 5/26/15): Both John Paul II and his successor Benedict XVI reiterated calls for “justice” for the Palestinians and respect for UN Resolution 242, which calls for Israeli withdrawal from territories conquered in 1967.



Error (Voice of America, 12/31/14): The United States has vetoed a United Nations Security Council draft resolution on Palestinian statehood that demanded Israel withdraw from the occupied territories.

Correction (Online as of 1/5/15): Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas on Wednesday signed a Palestinian request to join the International Criminal Court, a day after a bid for independence by 2017 failed at the U.N. Security Council. . . .

 
Even if the measure had received the nine votes needed for passage, the U.S. vote against it would have effectively vetoed the resolution.



Error (Voice of America, 12/31/14, headline): US Vetoes Palestinian Statehood Resolution at UN

Correction (Online as of 1/4/14): Palestinian President Signs Bid to Join ICC

 
Clarification: This story was updated to clarify that, while the U.S. vote against the Palestinian statehood measure had the effect of a veto, U.S. veto power was not needed because the resolution did not get the required nine votes to pass.



Error (International Herald Tribune, Hans Küng, Op-Ed, 3/4-5/06): The Palestinians can likewise demand that first Israel withdraw from all occupied territories in accordance with UN resolution 242. . .

Correction (3/7/06): An opinion article Saturday about preventing a clash of civilizations referred incorrectly to UN Security Council Resolution 242, passed after the 1967 Middle East War, which calls for Israel's armed forces to withdraw "from territories occupied in the recent conflict," not all territories occupied in the war.



Error (Charlotte Observer, Lama Hourani op-ed, 8/12/05): This can be achieved by implementing U.N. resolution 242 leading to a Palestinian state on the land occupied in 1967, including East Jerusalem...

Correction (9/01/05): In "Withdrawal from Gaza won't end the occupation" (Aug. 13 Viewpoint), Lama Hourami said U.N. Resolution 242 calls for a "Palestinian state on the land occupied in 1967, including East Jerusalem." The resolution calls for a withdrawal of Israeli armed forces "from territories occupied in the recent conflict," but does not specifically mention either a Palestinian state or Jerusalem.



Error (Associated Press, Salah Nasrawi, 3/18/05): The Jordanian proposal is meant to amend a Saudi peace initiative adopted at the 2002 Arab summit held in Beirut, which offered Israel peace with all Arab nations on condition it returns all land seized in the six-day war of 1967 - including East Jerusalem, the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Syria's Golan Heights - in line with U.N. resolutions 242 and 338.

Correction (Updated story, 3/18/05): The Saudi initiative offered Israel peace with all Arab nations on condition that Israel returns all land seized in the six-day war of 1967 in line with the Arab interpretation of U.N. resolution 242. The initiative also calls for the creation of a Palestinian state and a solution to the Palestinian refugee issue. Resolution 242, passed after the 1967 war, calls on Israel to withdraw "from territories occupied in the recent conflict" but does not say explicitly that the pullback should be from all such territories. However, Arabs view the resolution as just that - calling for Israeli withdrawal from East Jerusalem, the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Syria's Golan Heights.



Error (Wall Street Journal, Greg Hitt, 5/7/04): Mr. Bush affirmed his intention that “all final status issues” in Palestinian peace talks be negotiated “in accordance” with U.N. Security Council resolutions that call for Israel to withdraw from all land captured in the 1967 Mideast war.

Correction (5/11/04): United Nations Security Council resolution 242 calls on Israel to withdraw “from territories occupied” in the 1967 Arab-Israeli war, but doesn’t specify that the withdrawal should be from all such territories. An International page article Friday incorrectly stated that Security Council resolutions call for Israel to withdraw from all land captured in the 1967 war.



Error (Boston Globe, Dan Ephron, 5/28/03): But it [the “road map”] does say the final agreement should be anchored in UN resolutions and a Saudi peace initiative that call for Israel’s withdrawal from all of the West Bank and Gaza.

Correction (5/30/03): Because of an editing error, a story on Wednesday’s World page about the Mideast peace process incorrectly described past United Nations resolutions on the issue. Security Council Resolution 242 calls for Israel to withdraw from territories occupied in the 1967 war, without identifying the territories or specifying the extent of the withdrawal.



Error (Associated Press, 1/10/02): Larsen said that a Palestinian state "has to be established," adding that any solution to the Middle East problem has to be based on U.N. Security Council resolutions 242 and 338, which call for a withdrawal from all territory that Israel captured in the Arab-Israeli wars of 1967 and 1973.

Correction (1/10/02): Larsen said that a Palestinian state "has to be established," adding that any solution to the Middle East problem has to be based on U.N. Security Council resolutions 242 and 338, which call for a withdrawal from territory that Israel captured in the Arab-Israeli wars of 1967 and 1973.



Error (New York Times, Deborah Sontag, 9/6/00): Mr. Arafat, the experts say, has been putting forth the compromise position of United Nations resolutions that call for Israeli withdrawal from all territory occupied in the 1967 war – which includes all of East Jerusalem.

Correction (9/8/00): An article on Wednesday about the Middle East peace talks referred incorrectly to United Nations resolutions on the Arab-Israeli conflict. While Security Council Resolution 242, passed after the 1967 Middle East War, calls for Israel’s armed forces to withdraw "from territories occupied in the recent conflict," no resolution calls for Israeli withdrawal from all territory, including East Jerusalem, occupied in the war.



Error (New York Times, John Burns, 8/19/00): Mr. Arafat has toured more than 20 capitals in the Arab world, Europe and Asia since the Camp David talks, seeking backing for his position that Israel must accept United Nations resolutions passed after the Arab-Israeli war in 1967 and hand over all of east Jerusalem, including the Jewish quarter, to a future Palestinian state.

Correction (8/24/00): An article on Aug. 19 about efforts by the American envoy Dennis Ross to revive Israeli-Palestinian talks misstated terms of United Nations Security Council resolutions passed after the 1967 Middle East war. While Resolution 242 called for Israel’s armed forces to withdraw "from territories occupied in the recent conflict," no resolution called for Israel to hand over all of east Jerusalem to a future Palestinian state.



Error (Reuters in Washington Times, 8/8/00): U.N. Resolution 242 demands that Israel withdraw from all lands it occupied in the 1967 Middle East War, including Arab East Jerusalem, claimed by Palestinians as capital of a future state.

Correction (8/10/00): A Reuters news agency article carried in Tuesday’s editions misstated the terms of U.N. Resolution 242, which was passed by the Security Council following the 1967 Middle East War. The resolution says Israel should withdraw "from territories of recent conflict."



Error (Boston Globe, 7/13/00): The Palestinians insist that the peace accord signed on the White House Lawn more than six years ago was established within the framework of Israel complying with UN Resolution 242, which calls for Israeli withdrawal from the West Bank.

Correction (7/14/00): A story in yesterday’s edition on the Mideast summit at Camp David should have made it clear that UN Resolution 242 does not refer to the West Bank by name but calls for Israel to withdraw from territories occupied in the 1967 war. The resolution, which formalizes the principals of land-for-peace in the Arab-Israeli conflict, is ambiguous on the amount of occupied territory from which Israel should withdraw.



Error (New York Times, 7/11/00): The Palestinians want a settlement based on United Nations Resolution 242, which calls for an end to Israeli occupation of the entire West Bank and Gaza, seized in the 1967 war.

Correction (7/14/00): The chart on Tuesday listing issues to be discussed in the Middle East peace talks at Camp David referred incorrectly to Resolution 242 of the United Nations Security Council, which was approved after the Middle East war of 1967. It calls for the withdrawal of Israeli armed forces "from territories occupied in the recent conflict"; it is the Palestinians who associate that language with the West Bank and the Gaza Strip.