Monday, February 19, 2018
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Uncorrected

Geography

Error (Los Angeles Times, Patrick McDonnell, 11/10/06): The bombing inquiry [in Argentina] has drawn praise from Washington, Tel Aviv and the Jewish community worldwide. . .

Fact: While Israel did praise the Argentinean inquiry, the praise originated in Jerusalem, not Tel Aviv. In particular, the Foreign Ministry’s Spokesman Bureau, located in the Israeli capital of Jerusalem, issued a statement on the inquiry.



Error (Ha'aretz, Nehemia Shtrasler, 3/21/06): . . the Ma'ale Adumim bloc will be connected to Jerusalem via E1, and cut the West Bank in half.

Fact: Even if E1 construction is completed, Palestinian-controlled areas would be connected by land east of Ma’aleh Adumim that is at its narrowest point approximately 15 kilometers wide. (It’s worth noting that is approximately the same distance as the strip of land separating the Green Line from the Mediterranean Sea near Herzliya.) Furthermore, three routes are available for West Bank Palestinians to travel freely from south to north, and a fourth is on the way. All of these are totally unaffected by the E-1 building plan. USA Today has already corrected the identical error.



Error (Philadelphia Inquirer, Trudy Rubin, 4/13/05): ... plans to build 3,500 housing units on the West Bank to connect the settlement of Maaleh Adumim with Jerusalem. This would cut the West Bank in half and isolate it from Arab areas of East Jerusalem.

Fact: The proposed neighborhood of Maaleh Adumim will neither cut the West Bank in half nor isolate it from eastern Jerusalem. For details, click here.



Error (Detroit News, Hasan Newash and David Finkel, 4/6/05): The completion of this wall -- under the cover of the "peace process" -- would leave less than half the West Bank (10 percent of historic Palestine) in Palestinian hands, divided into two disconnected mini-Bantustans ... .

Fact: Israel's separation barrier leaves at least 92 percent of the West Bank on the "Palestinian side" of the barrier. This land is not disconnected, but rather is one contiguous land mass.



Error (Los Angeles Times, Tyler Marshall, 2/28/05): During the Clinton administration, in what has been described as a painful dialogue, the United States pressured Israel in 2000 to cancel a potentially lucrative sale to China of its Phalcon airborne early warning and control system, and then persuaded Tel Aviv to impound a fleet of anti-radar drone aircraft that was delivered in China in the mid-1990s but returned to Israel for upgrading.

Fact: This passage erroneously suggests that Tel Aviv is the capital of Israel. The correct reference is Jerusalem. In addition, while Marshall reports as fact that Israel cancelled its harpy drone deal with China, there are conflicting news reports about whether Israel did so. There were scattered reports that Israel cancelled the deal by either impounding the drones or sending them back to China without upgrading them. (See, for example, AFP’s “Israel fears huge fine over nixed drones export to China,” Jan. 12, 2005.) However, other news sources note that Israeli officials promptly denied those reports. Thus, Voice of Israel reported Jan. 11, 2005: “Israeli defence sources have ‘categorically denied’ reports that Israel has suspended a deal with China to upgrade drone aircraft.” And, Peter Enav of Associated Press reported the same day: “The Israeli military on Tuesday denied reports that Israel had suspended an upgrade for drone aircraft it sould to China in the 1990s. Rachel Niedak-Ashkenazi, spokeswoman for the Israeli Denfense Ministry, said Israel had not returned parts to the Chinese military as earlier reported.” Furthermore, Marshall’s language suggests that the Harpy drone aircraft issue arose during the Clinton administration, when it happened at the beginning of 2005.



Error (AFP, captions for several Mohammed Abed photos, 10/26/03): Israeli troops blew up scores of apartments in the southern Gaza Strip after three soldiers were killed Oct. 24 as they guarded Netzarim Jewish settlement.

Fact: First, the three soldiers were not killed as they guarded a Jewish settlement. As reported by countless news agencies, including AFP, the three were murdered while in their living quarters, probably asleep. For example, AFP’s Abdel Zaanoun accurately reported Oct. 24: “The army said two of the soldiers killed in the night-time raid on the heavily guarded settlement were women and the third a male colleague. They were killed in their sleep in a caravan, according to military radio.”

Second, the dynamited buildings are located in Al-Zahara, which is in the northern Gaza Strip, not the southern Gaza Strip. It is about a mile south of Gaza City, and nearby Netzarim, both of which are north.



Error (AFP, Sakher Abu El Oun, 10/26/03): Israeli troops blew up scores of apartments in the southern Gaza Strip Sunday after three soldiers were killed as they guarded a nearby Jewish settlement.

Fact: First, the three soldiers were not killed “as they guarded a nearby Jewish settlement.” As reported by countless news agencies, including AFP, the three were murdered while in their living quarters, probably asleep. For example, AFP’s Abdel Zaanoun accurately reported Oct. 24: “The army said two of the soldiers killed in the night-time raid on the heavily guarded settlement were women and the third a male colleague. They were killed in their sleep in a caravan, according to military radio.”

Second, the dynamited buildings are located in Al-Zahara, which is in the northern Gaza Strip, not the southern Gaza Strip. It is about a mile south of Gaza City, and nearby Netzarim, both of which are north.



Error (New York Times, AP reporter Hussein Dakroub, 5/31/03): While the United States lists Hezbollah as a terrorist group, Lebanon regards it as a political party fighting Israeli occupation of a tiny piece of land in south Lebanon.

Fact: “A tiny piece of land in south Lebanon” under Israeli occupation is presumably a reference to a region called Chebaa Farms. However, in its June 16, 2000 report of the Secretary-General (S/2000/590), the United Nations ruled that Israel had fully withdrawn from Lebanese territory. According to the United Nations, Chebaa Farms is Golan Heights land which Israel conquered from Syria in the 1967 war, and thus is not part of Lebanon at all. In a Feb. 21, 2001 correction, the New York Times was clear on this point.



Error (Associated Press, Hussein Dakroub, 5/30/03): While the United States lists Hezbollah as a terrorist group, Lebanon regards it as a political party fighting Israeli occupation of a tiny piece of land in south Lebanon.

Fact: “A tiny piece of land in south Lebanon” under Israeli occupation is presumably a reference to a region called Chebaa Farms. However, in its June 16, 2000 report of the Secretary-General (S/2000/590), the United Nations ruled that Israel had fully withdrawn from Lebanese territory. According to the United Nations, Chebaa Farms is Golan Heights land which Israel conquered from Syria in the 1967 war, and thus is not part of Lebanon at all. In multiple past articles, Dakroub had correctly covered the status of Chebaa Farms. (See, for example, April 15, 2001 and April 22, 2001).



Error (ABC World News Tonight, Elizabeth Vargas, 5/11/02): In Tel Aviv tonight, tens of thousands of Israelis held an anti-war protest. The demonstrators were calling for peace with the Palestinians. Members of the Peace Now Coalition took part in the rally in Israel's capital.

Fact: Israel's capital is Jerusalem, not Tel Aviv.