Media Corrections

Accuracy and accountability are among the most important tenets of journalism. In combination, they mean media organizations are expected to publish or broadcast forthright corrections after sharing inaccurate information. The following corrections are among the many prompted by CAMERA’s communication with reporters and editors.

 

CAMERA Obtains NPR Correction on UN Vote

CAMERA prompted the following correction on a July 21 newscast by NPR's Carl Kasell, who erroneously reported that the U.N. vote against Israel's West Bank barrier was unanimous.

WASHINGTON POST-WATCH: Stand Corrected

So when is a correction not a correction? Often, when it's a Washington Post attempt to remedy a mistake in the paper's Arab-Israeli coverage.

‘Crossfire’ Fallout at AJR

In the June/July issue of American Journalism Review, Barbara Matusow covered the contentious topic of criticism of Middle East news coverage. In avoiding any substantive assessment of the content of the criticism, Matusow's overarching message was that journalists are a blameless, beleaguered group, assailed by propagandists and baseless accusations. Her implication was proven baseless when CAMERA prompted the following correction on Matusow's own report.

UPDATED: CAMERA Elicits Washington Post Correction

CAMERA prompted the following correction concerning a July 12 article by John Ward Anderson which erroneously reported on Palestinian attacks on Israel. The San Francisco Chronicle and the Boston Globe later ran the correction. NPR also corrected the same error. 

CAMERA Prompts CSM Correction: Efrat Not an Outpost

In a July 9 "Reporters on  the Job" segment, the Christian Science Monitor erroneously described the West Bank town of Efrat as a "settler outpost." In response to CAMERA's July 14 email about the error, the paper's International Editor thanked CAMERA for "bringing it to [his] attention," and today the paper printed the following correction:

Updated: AP Caption Writers Take Sides in Arab-Israeli Conflict

July 1 update follows. With AP photographers around the world producing 1,000 photographs of breaking news daily, it is puzzling that AP would resort to distributing old file photos of events that have no apparent connection to the day's events. But that is exactly what AP did on June 19, 2004, re-releasing five file unrelated photos from the Gaza Strip with only a biased caption in common.

Updated: AP Finally Corrects

July 2 update follows. The foreign desk at the Associated Press wire service apparently has no mechanism in place to correct factual errors. Over the last year, evidence regarding more than half a dozen straight-forward substantive errors was passed from editor to editor until it fell by the wayside. This was the case in a June 10 error by correspondent Ali Daraghmeh, who falsely reported that in the West Bank, "Israel does not allow Palestinian officers to patrol in uniform."