Media Corrections

Accuracy and accountability are among the most important tenets of journalism. In combination, they mean media organizations are expected to publish or broadcast forthright corrections after sharing inaccurate information. The following corrections are among the many prompted by CAMERA’s communication with reporters and editors.

 

Dissembling Demolitions

Why do photo services feature images of forlorn Palestinian children scampering across rubble if the structures were uninhabited?

CAMERA Obtains Correction at New York Times

CAMERA has obtained the following correction from the <I>New York Times</I>:

Correction (12/12/03): An article last Friday about President Bush's meeting with King Abdullah of Jordan misstated the effect that an unofficial peace plan drafted by Israelis and Palestinians, known as the Geneva plan, would have on Israeli settlements. Under that plan, Israel would give up most of the settlements in the West Bank, not keep them. But since the 400,000 Israelis in the West Bank and Jerusalem are concentrated in a few settlements and neighborhoods that Israel would keep under the plan, about 300,000 settlers would remain where they live.</P>

CAMERA Obtains Clarification from Boston Globe

CAMERA has obtained the following clarification from the Boston Globe:

Clarification (12/11/03): A Dec. 3 column by Tom Wallace stated that the security fence in Israel will confiscate 55 percent of the West Bank. This is a projection by Gush Shalom and other peace groups. The United Nations estimates less than 20 percent of the West Bank will be on the Israeli side of the fence.

CAMERA Obtains Correction at New York Times

CAMERA has obtained the following correction from the New York Times:

Correction (12/3/2003): An article last Wednesday about the decision by the Bush administration to cancel $289.5 million in American-backed loan guarantees for Israel referred incorrectly to West Bank construction activities that prompted it. Although federal law requires revoking loan guarantees to penalize certain construction deemed contrary to American policy, the United States does not define the activities as illegal.

UPDATED: Finally Getting It Straight at Lawrence Eagle-Tribune

A headline in the Lawrence Eagle-Tribune erroneously suggested that Israeli troops carelessly killed a Palestinian child when, in fact, Israeli troops destroyed the home of a Palestinian gunman who had killed an Israeli baby. Apparently, the headline writer's operating assumption was that when it comes to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and a dead baby, the Israelis are culpable and the tiny victim is, of course, Palestinian. No matter what the articles themselves say.

UPDATED: New York Times Wrongly Claims No Injuries From Qassam Rockets

In a report published today ("Israeli Strikes Kill 2 Militants and a Girl"), New York Times correspondent James Bennet mistakenly asserted that no Israelis had been injured in Qassam rocket attacks. Contrary to the Times' claim, a number of Israelis, including infants, have been seriously wounded by Qassam rockets.

UPDATED: NPR Discovers Terror in the West Bank

National Public Radio, which routinely calls Hamas suicide bombers "militants" or "activists," rather than terrorists, has finally found some West Bankers it can comfortably refer to with the "T" word. And no, these terrorists are not from Islamic Jihad, or the Al- Aqsa Martyr's Brigades, or the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, or the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine ...

New York Times Veers Off the ‘Road Map’

The New York Times has trouble reporting the facts straight about Middle East documents, repeatedly distorting their terms and shifting responsibility — and fault — to Israel. Recent misinformation about the road map by correspondent Steven Weisman is fuel for critics who see the paper increasingly marshaling its news pages to advance an editorial agenda.

Road Map Corrections

With past Israeli-Palestinian peace plans, the media tended to minimize or ignore Palestinian obligations while highlighting or exaggerating Israeli obligations.