Media Corrections

Accuracy and accountability are among the most important tenets of journalism. In combination, they mean media organizations are expected to publish or broadcast forthright corrections after sharing inaccurate information. The following corrections are among the many prompted by CAMERA’s communication with reporters and editors.

 

CAMERA Obtains Correction at the Washington Post

A letter from CAMERA to the Washington Post prompted a correction on an article which vastly overstated the number of Palestinian refugees. Today's correction is similar to a New York Times correction two days ago which CAMERA also elicited. 

CAMERA Obtains Correction at New York Times

In response to correspondence from CAMERA, the New York Times printed the following correction concerning the number of Palestinian refugees from the 1948 war:

UPDATED: Tom Friedman’s Grudging Correction

Friedman admits he was wrong, sort of, about Israel's release of Palestinian prisoners during the tenure of Palestinian Prime Minister Abbas. But he maintains that Sharon was responsible for Abbas's resignation, a claim which Abbas himself refuted this week.

UPDATED: CAMERA Staff, Members Prompt NPR Correction

CAMERA staff and members prompted an NPR correction concerning the extent of destruction incurred by the Jenin refugee camp in the 2002 Israeli operation.Ombudsman Jeffrey Dvorkin discusses the error and correction on the network's Web site. A CAMERA staff member provided NPR with a European Union statistic from a United Nations report disproving McCarthy's claim that the camp had been "largely destroyed." Jeffrey Dvorkin's March 24 commentary follows:

CAMERA Obtains Correction on New York Times Letter

CAMERA prompted the following correction about a letter by Rhoda Shapiro of Encinitas, Calif., who erroneously claimed that Israel's military is the largest in the region. CAMERA applauds the Times' forthright willingness to correct a letter-to-the-editor.

CAMERA Obtains Correction at NPR

At CAMERA's urging, NPR corrected its inaccurate February 28 statement that an Israeli couple had been murdered near the "settlement of Meitar." The town of Meitar is located fully within Israel, just south of the Green Line.