Ariel Sharon

Makdisi Smears Sharon in LA Times

Saree Makdisi, a professor of English and comparative literature at UCLA, and a nephew of Edward Said, has inherited his uncle's political outlook ‑ an opposition to the existence of the state of Israel. Like Said, Makdisi has channeled his animosity into publishing anti‑Israel screeds full of false rhetoric. He has become, for instance, a regular contributor to the Los Angeles Times, despite a November 2004 Op‑Ed which was corrected due to factual errors and distortions.

Hitchens Defames Sharon in Slate

No sooner did Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon suffer a massive stroke, than Slate posted an error-ridden column by regular contributor Christopher Hitchens, falsely suggesting that Ariel Sharon masterminded the 1982 massacre of Palestinians in the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps in Lebanon. Ironically, the article is meant to praise Sharon, albeit grudgingly, for his political transformation from a proponent of the settler movement to a proponent of the creation of a Palestinian state. But to do this, Hitchens demonizes the Israeli leader's past actions, misrepresenting the facts along the way.

Ariel Sharon Timeline

Ariel Sharon has been a key participant in the history of Israel, from his membership in the pre-state Hagana militia to his watershed Gaza disengagement. Here is a timeline of key events in Sharon's life.

On NPR, Arab Journalist Rami Khouri Blames Ariel Sharon for Islamism

Rami Khouri, editor-at-large of Lebanon's Daily Star, and a frequent NPR guest, today on the network actually blamed Ariel Sharon for the rise of Islamism in the Middle East. Perhaps Khouri has never heard of the Wahhabis, or the Saudis and their vast oil wealth, or the Taliban, or Sudan under al-Turabi. That being the case, it's too bad for NPR listeners that the network has heard of Khouri, and invites him on so often.

CAMERA Prompts AP Correction on Temple Mount Visit

In response to CAMERA's communication with Associated Press editors, the wire service today corrected an error and a misrepresentation about Ariel Sharon's September 2000 visit to the Temple Mount. The original and updated, improved versions follow:

IHT Fabricates Purpose of Bush-Sharon Meeting

The International Herald Tribune, published by the New York Times, has taken a page from the Times' book of journalistic wrongdoing. The Times earlier distorted the Bush Administration's decision to not pressure Sharon about West Bank settlements, and now the Tribune falsely claims that the Bush-Sharon meeting yesterday was "intended to press Sharon to move . . . on the West Bank."

CAMERA Letter Published in New Statesman

The following letter was published in the August 1, 2005 edition of the New Statesman. The magazine would not publish a formal correction to the factual error addressed in the letter. An editor told CAMERA that the magazine's policy is to publish letters instead of corrections to rectify errors. But according to a news database, the magazine publishes a fair number of corrections.

CNN Tilts Sharon, Arafat Profiles

In celebration of CNN's first 25 years, the network collaborated with Time magazine to broadcast a special highlighting "the top 25 most fascinating people." Ranking 15 and 10 are Ariel Sharon and Yasir Arafat. CNN's treatment of the two leaders is itself fascinating because it gives disproportionate play to Palestinian grievances against Sharon, and downplays Arafat's terrorism.

New York Review of Books Stonewalls on Correcting Errors

On Dec. 2, 2004, the New York Review of Books ran an error-filled essay by Henry Siegman ("Sharon and the Future of Palestine"). The publication has been alerted to the errors, but has declined to address them.