Wednesday, July 30, 2014
  Home
RSS Feed
Facebook
Twitter
Search:
Media Analyses
Journalists
Middle East Issues
Christian Issues
Names In The News
CAMERA Authors
Headlines & Photos
Errors & Corrections
Film Reviews
CAMERA Publications
Film Suggestions
Be An Activist
Adopt A Library
History of CAMERA
About CAMERA
Join/Contribute
Contact CAMERA
Contact The Media
Links
Privacy Policy
 
Media Analyses





Economist's Nicolas Pelham Deceives About Christians


May 25 Update: Haaretz Republishes Pelham's Op-Ed
 
On Friday, May 23, two days before Pope Francis' scheduled visit to Israel, Haaretz's English print edition took the highly irregular step of republishing Nicolas Pelham's May 12 Op-Ed, a piece which had been grossly misleading on several counts. While some of the specific problems that CAMERA noted last week do not appear in the more recent publication, at least two basic underlying deceptions remain. CAMERA's original May 13 post is below, and is followed by details about revisions made to the Op-Ed which reappeared in the print edition on Friday.
 
May 13 -- Charging "Israel's multiple self-professed lobbyists" for having "donned the mantle of Christian saviors," The Economist's Nicolas Pelham cites Proverbs to excoriate: "Deceive not with thy lips." Writing yesterday in Haaretz ("Christians in Israel and Palestine"), it is Pelham himself who repeatedly deceives. 
 
Population Decline or Growth?
 
First, he completely misleads about Israel's Christian population, claiming it has declined, when in fact it has increased by 268 percent since 1949. He writes:
What [Israel's lobbyists] do not say is that Israel's population of native Christians has fallen by roughly the same proportion. From 8 percent in 1947 (in all of mandatory Palestine), it numbered 4 percent in 1948, and is now less than 2 percent. The reasons for the decline are largely the same. Jewish, as Muslim, birth-rates are much higher. [Note: The last sentence appears only online. It is not in the print edition.]
What Pelham does not say is that according to The Statistical Abstract of Israel, there were approximately 34,000 Christians living in Israel in 1949. This figure was not broken down by ethnicity, but the vast majority of these people were Arab Christians. And at the end of 2011, there were approximately, 125,000 Arab Christians living in Israel. By citing relative figures instead of absolute figures, Pelham deceives readers into believing Israel's Christian population "has fallen," when the opposite is true.
 
Deceive not with thy lips.
 
St. George's Harmony of Violence?
 
Painting a dubious picture of mutual respect and harmony among Muslim and Christian Palestinians, Pelham deceives:
On St. George's Day, Muslims join Christians to commemorate his martyrdom at his shrine in Al-Khader, near Bethlehem.
Hardly the picture of coexistence, last week's celebration of the feast of St. George at St. George's Orthodox Church ended in a violent clash, as was documented on a YouTube video that went viral:
 
 
According to Lela Gilbert, author of Saturday People, Sunday People, Israel through the Eyes of a Christian Sojourner:
A Bethlehem Greek Orthodox Church (St. George's Church - Khadar - near Beit Jala) was attacked by Muslims during its annual St. George's Day services on May 6. ... Some local Muslims either tried to park a car too close the church and/or tried to enter the church during a service honoring St. George - the initial instigation isn't clear. But when the intruders were asked to leave, one of them stabbed a Christian man who was outside the church serving as a guard. He was hospitalized. Several then started throwing stones at the church. 7 or 8 Christians were injured and some physical damage was done - broken windows etc. The police didn’t show up for an hour.
"Despite the contradictory reports, it seems pretty obvious that whatever police presence there was at St. George’s on its feast day, it was insufficient to prevent an outbreak of violence, which resulted in several injuries including one broken nose," observed Dexter Van Zile, CAMERA's Christian Media Analyst. "In sum, stones were thrown at Christianity’s living stones near the city of Christ’s birth."
 
"No matter how you look at it, the episode represents a failure on the part of the Palestinian Authority, one that local journalists and Christian leaders are – for understandable reasons – reluctant to highlight," Van Zile added.
 
Deceive not with thy lips.
 
Islamist Bullying in Gaza A Thing of the Past?
 
Pelham depicts a false rosy picture for Gaza's Christians, falsely suggesting that intimidation was limited to "the early days of Hamas rule in Gaza." He writes:
In the early days of Hamas rule in Gaza, militants firebombed a church and attacked its worshippers uncannily close to a police station. But the Islamists have since clamped down on their own; their prime minister, Ismail Haniyeh, pointedly attended church to honor a local Christian politician.
 
The U.S. State Department's International Freedom Report for 2012 (the most recent report available) paints a more sober picture of the status of Gaza's Christians. "The de facto Hamas authorities in Gaza continued to restrict religious freedom in both law and practice, and the negative trend for respect of this right was reflected in such abuses as arresting or detaining Muslims in Gaza who did not abide by Hamas' strict interpretation of Islam . . . " The report noted:
Hamas largely tolerated the small Christian presence in Gaza and did not force Christians to abide by Islamic law. However, Hamas' religious ideology negatively affected Christians, according to church leaders. For example, local religious leaders received warnings ahead of Christian holidays against any public display of Christianity. Christians raised concerns that Hamas failed to defend their rights as a religious minority. Local officials sometimes advised converts to leave their communities to prevent harassment against them. Hamas officials on July 19 publicly denied allegations from the Greek Orthodox Church in Gaza that Hamas-affiliated officials coerced Ramez Ayman and Hiba Abu Dawoud and her three children to convert to Islam. Christians staged a protest at Gaza's main church in late July.
What Pelham does not say is that as recently as July 2012, Palestinian Christians living in the Gaza Strip were reportedly kidnapped and forced to convert to Islam. "According to the Greek Orthodox Church in the Gaza Strip, at least five Christians have been kidnapped and forced to convert to Islam in recent weeks," Khaled Abu Toameh reported in Gatestone Institute ("Who Will Save the Christians in the Gaza Strip"?). He added:
The church blamed an unidentified terror group of being behind the forced conversions and called on the international community to intervene to save the Christians.

Church leaders also accused a prominent Hamas man of being behind the kidnapping and forced conversion of a Christian woman, Huda Abu Daoud, and her three daughters. Shortly after she disappeared, the woman sent a message to her husband's mobile phone informing him that she and her daughters had converted to Islam.

In a rare public protest, leaders and members of the 2,000-strong Christian community in the Gaza Strip staged a sit-in strike in the Gaza Strip this week to condemn the abductions and forced conversions in particular, and persecution at the hands of radical Muslims in general.

Deceive not with thy lips.
 
Christmas Tree Ban in the Knesset?
 
The Jerusalem-based journalist and writer on Arab affairs erred when he wrote:
 
 
The online article helpfully provides a link to a Dec. 26, 2013 AP story which appeared at the time in Haaretz. The AP article does not support Mr. Pelham's claim that the Knesset bans Christmas trees "from its premises." In fact, it states:
Knesset speaker Yuli Edelstein says he refused to display a Christmas tree in the parliament because of the "painful memories" it evoked among Jews.
 
Edelstein told Israel Radio Thursday such a public display of a Christian symbol could be construed as offensive.
 
Earlier this week, Edelstein rejected the request of a Christian-Arab lawmaker. He said the parliamentarian could display a tree in his office and party's conference room. (Emphasis added.)
Thus, while a Christmas tree was not permitted in public space in the Knesset, it was permitted in private offices and party conference rooms. In other words, Christmas trees are not banned from the Knesset "premises."
 
What Pelham does not say is that it is prohibited to publicly display Christmas trees in all of Gaza City and the rest of the Strip, while Christmas trees are distributed for free in Jerusalem and elsewhere in Israel. In fact, the free Christmas trees are available twice a year in Israel, once for western Christians and then a few days later for Greek Orthodox Christians.
 
There hasn't been a Christmas tree in Gaza City's main square since Hamas pushed the Palestinian Authority out of Gaza in 2007 and Christmas is no longer a public holiday. . . .
 
[Peter Qubrsi, a Catholic from Gaza] describes being stopped in the street by a Hamas official who told him to remove the cross. "I told him it's not his business and that I wouldn't," Peter said. After being threatened with arrest he was eventually let go, but the incident scared him.
Deceive not with thy lips.
 
Following communication from CAMERA's Israel office, Haaretz editors changed the online text to the following accurate wording:
 
 
Editors also appended a vague note at the bottom of the article which fails to make clear what was amended and why:
 
 
Haaretz has not yet corrected in print.
 
Why Did Azmi Bishara Leave?
 
In another deception, Nicolas Pelham asserts:
 
The country's most prominent Christian politician, Azmi Bishara, was hounded out of Israel amid cries of treachery after he dared to suggest that Israel should be a state for all its citizens.
 
In fact, Haaretz itself reported at the time a very different account of Bishara's departure to Jordan shortly before he was charged with passing information to Hezbollah:
 
 
Haaretz added:

A senior Shin Bet official told reporters earlier in the day that Bishara had had prolonged contact with Hezbollah members who were involved in gathering information on Israel.

Bishara allegedly provided "information, suggestions and recommendations," including censored material, to his contacts in Lebanon during the war.

The Shin Bet official said that Bishara was fully aware of the sensitivity of the information. According to the Shin Bet, he was given "missions" from Hezbollah, which he then carried out.

Bishara allegedly advised Hezbollah on the ramifications of firing missiles further south than Haifa. At the time, Hezbollah was debating whether to strike at targets deeper inside Israel. A few days later, missiles struck south of Haifa for the first time.

The former lawmaker is also suspected of helping Hezbollah with assessments regarding a possible Israeli assassination attempt on Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah, as well as offering advice on waging psychological warfare against the Israelis.

Deceive not with thy lips.
 
Many of the pieces in The Economist are unsigned, so it's hard to know whether or not Pelham is responsible for the now infamous (and since corrected) reference to Kochav Yair as a "fanatical settlement." (It is neither.)
 
Revisions in the May 23 Publication
 
1) Pelham's underlying demographic deception remains unchanged. Readers are led to believe that Israel's Christian population has "fallen" since 1949, when in fact in absolute numbers it has increased 268 percent since that time.
 
2) The May 23 version does not include any reference to supposed Christian-Muslim harmony at the St. George's ceremony earlier this month. The reference to St. George's has been deleted entirely.
 
3) The more recent version continues to dissemble about Hamas' treatment of Christians in Gaza, stating that since Hamas' early days of governing Gaza, "the Islamists have since clamped down on their own." There has been no change to that passage, and uninformed readers would still have no idea that as of 2012 there were still reports of kidnappings and forced conversions of Christians. 
 
In addition, unknowledgeable readers would still gain the misimpression that Christians are free to publicly display Christmas trees and other Christian symbols anywhere in Gaza, while it is only the Israeli Knesset which bans the public display of Christmas trees.
 
4) Haaretz editors have improved the reference to former MK Azmi Bishara, adding the fact that he was charged for spying for Hezbollah. It reads:
The country's most prominent Christian politician, former Knesset member Azmi Bishara, was hounded out of the country in 2007 amid cries of treachery. The police had launched an investigation into his ties with Lebanon's Shi'ite group Hezbollah, but opponents also denounced him for wanting Israel to be a state for all its citizens.

Bookmark and Share