Los Angeles Times Conjures Up International Airport in Jerusalem

Sept. 6 UPDATE:

Los Angeles Times Corrects

In response to communication from CAMERA,  on Sept. 2 The Los Angeles Times published a correction in the print edition making clear that the reference to the UAE likely setting up in Tel Aviv as opposed to Jerusalem due to the capital's disputed status should have been made in reference to the embassy, and not flights. See below for a detailed update.

To accompany the palpable excitement about the Emirati-Israeli breakthrough promising full diplomatic ties between the Gulf country and the Jewish state, The Los Angeles Times inadvertently served up a dose of comedy. The page 4 article in the Aug. 14 print edition blundered ("Israel suspends annexation in pact with UAE; Agreement to pursue diplomatic ties angers Palestinians aiming for a unified Arab bloc"):

Direct flights would be established as well as reciprocal embassies — though Emirati flights would probably go to Tel Aviv and not the holy city of Jerusalem, claimed by both Israel and the Palestinians and controversially recognized as Israeli by Trump, the only world leader to do so.
 
There is no functioning airport in Jerusalem, so discussion about directing flights to Tel Aviv allegedly because of Jerusalem's disputed status is absurd. The Atarot airport in northern Jerusalem, built by the British in 1924, was closed in 2000 with the outbreak of the second intifada. In the 1970s and 1980s it was used primarily for domestic cargo flights. For a look at the condition of Atarot airport's current condition, see the YouTube below.
The political consideration regarding Jerusalem certainly does come into play regarding the question of the UAE's future embassy to Israel – but not its flight destination. Indeed, the digital version of the same article does not contain the misleading reference about probably Emirati flights to Tel Aviv due to Jerusalem's disputed status. Instead, it more accurately reports, apparently referring to the embassy, and not the flights:
Direct flights would be established as well as reciprocal embassies — although it was likely the UAE would go to Tel Aviv and not the disputed holy city of Jerusalem, claimed by both Israel and the Palestinians and controversially recognized as Israeli by Trump, the only world leader to do so.

Meanwhile, the gaffe provided for a good laugh on Twitter.

 

The apocalyptic horror film"World War Z" in which a zombie pandemic overtakes the world features a dramatic escape scene at the Jerusalem airport.

Sept. 6 Update: Los Angeles Times Corrects

On Sept. 2, the newspaper published the following correction in the print edition:

UAE and Israel: In the Aug. 14 Section A, an article about the United Arab Emirates and Israel agreeing to work toward establishing full diplomatic ties said Emirati flights would probably go to Tel Aviv and not the disputed holy city of Jerusalem. It should have said it was likely the Emirates would put an embassy in Tel Aviv and not Jerusalem.