Ethan Bronner

      The New York Times Still Spinning the News

      The New York Times continues to spin the news about the Palestinian-Israeli conflict through its framing and placement of stories. Take, for example, the Saturday, Nov. 17 edition.

      At the New York Times: Inflammatory Photo Fit to Print?

      muzzle_flashThe March 8th edition of the New York Times inexplicably placed on the front page above the fold "Mideast Din Drowns Out Palestinians," featuring an inflammatory photo apparently showing Israeli soldiers firing rifles at “Palestinian stone-throwers.” But that's not what the photo actually showed, and this was only the beginning of the report's problems.

      Ethan Bronner and Facts Too Good to Check

      Ethan BronnerAccording to a report by Ethan Bronner of the New York Times, Israel imprisoned a Palestinian child merely for "throwing stones and hanging Palestinian flags from telephone poles." In fact the teenager in question was convicted for attempted murder and possession of explosives.

      The New York Times’ War Against Israeli Settlers

      As part of its general lopsided coverage of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the New York Times has stepped up its attacks on Israeli settlers. According to Jerusalem bureau chief Ethan Bronner, "for much of the world, the very presence of ... Israeli settlers in the West Bank amounts to a kind of violent crime."

      CAMERA Op-Ed: Bronner’s Flotilla Bias

      For The New York Times bureau chief, the latest flotilla campaign organized by terrorist groups and anti-Israel radicals brought to mind, amazingly, Holocaust survivors seeking refuge in pre-state Israel on the Exodus. The sum of the "news analysis" was one more example of fact-anemic bias by the paper.

      Media Misreport on 1967 Ceasefire Lines

      After a policy speech in which Barack Obama said the “1967 lines” should be the basis of a future border between Israelis and Palestinians, major media organizations wrongly announced that the president referenced “1967 borders.” The difference between the two terms — borders and lines — is extremely significant.