Saturday, October 25, 2014
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Corrected

New York Times

Error (International New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 9/15/14): The United Nations Relief and Works Agency runs schools through the ninth grade for the children of Palestinians who were expelled from or fled homes in Israel and the West Bank, about 70 percent of Gaza's 1.8 million residents.

Correction (9/19/14): Because of an editing error, an article on Monday in the Education section misstated the family history of the students through the ninth grade who attend schools run by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency in Gaza. They are the descendants of Palestinians who were expelled or who fled from homes in Israel and the West Bank, not just the children of those who were expelled or fled. As result of that error, the article misstated the group that makes up about 70 percent of Gaza's 1.8 million residents. It is the descendants of those who were expelled or fled, not the children.



Error (New York Times, editorial, 7/8/14): On Sunday, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel, after days of near silence, condemned that killing and promised that anyone found guilty would "face the full weight of the law.”


Correction (7/9/14): An article on Monday about the arrest of six Israelis in the killing of a Palestinian teenager referred incorrectly to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s response to the killing of Muhammad Abu Khdeir. On the day of the killing, Mr. Netanyahu’s office issued a statement saying he had told his minister for internal security to quickly investigate the crime; it is not the case that “days of near silence” passed before he spoke about it. The error was repeated in an editorial on Tuesday.



Error (International New York Times, photo caption, ): Thousands thronged Friday to Shuafat, the East Jerusalem neighborhood where Muhammad Abu Khdeir, 16, was abducted. The Israeli police braced for violence that did not materialize.

Correction (7/9/14): A caption accompanying an article about the funeral for a Palestinian teenager in the Saturday-Sunday issue incorrectly stated that "the Israeli police braced for violence that did not materialize" on Friday. Clashes between Palestinians and the Israeli police were reported on that day.



Error (International New York Times, photo caption, 4/27/14): A Palestinian with a gas mask on Friday at an Israeli settlement near Nablus, the West Bank.

Correction (4/30/14): A front-page photo caption in Saturday-Sunday editions misidentified the location of a Palestinian protest over the Jewish settlement of Qadomem. The protest took place near Qadomem, not in it.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 2/11/14): Israel opened its first industrial zone in occupied Palestinian territory shortly after the 1967 war, in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Atarot.

Correction (2/20/14): An article on Feb. 11 about a debate over whether Israeli companies operating in West Bank settlements do more to help or hurt the Palestinians they employ referred imprecisely to the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Atarot, where Israel opened an industrial zone after the 1967 war. While the Palestinians and most of the world consider it to be occupied Palestinian territory, Atarot was a Jewish village until 1948, and Israel considers all of Jerusalem to be its capital.

Fact: It is unclear on what basis the newspaper reached the conclusion that "most of the world" sees Atarot as Palestinian territory.



Error (New York Times, Ali Jarbawi, Op-Ed, 1/22/14): In 2000, [Ariel Sharon] entered Al Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem, a holy Muslim site, which triggered the second intifada.

Correction (1/28/14): Because of an editing error, an opinion article on Wednesday incorrectly described a 2000 visit by Ariel Sharon to the contested religious site known as the Temple Mount. He toured the complex, which includes the Al Aqsa Mosque, but did not enter the mosque itself.



Error (New York Times, Lindsay Crouse, 12/19/13): And the Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, included in a message to Secretary of State John Kerry a YouTube video of Mr. Assaf singing longingly about cities in Israel that were once Palestinian.

 
Mr. Assaf group up in the Khan Younis refugee camp in Gaza, an area that often has shortages of water, gas and electricity because of restrictions imposed by Israel.


Correction (12/31/13): An article on Dec. 19 about Mohammed Assaf, a Palestinian singer from Gaza who has become a star in the Arab world after winning the “Arab Idol” competition, referred incorrectly to cities in Israel Mr. Assaf sings about. While they had largely Arab populations before Israel became a state in 1948, they were not “Palestinian” in the sense of being part of a Palestinian political entity. The article also referred incorrectly to shortages of water, gas and electricity in Gaza. While Israel places restrictions on some goods coming into Gaza, and many Palestinians blame Israel for shortages, they were worsened by Egypt’s closing of smuggling tunnels and by a tax dispute between the militant Hamas faction, which governs Gaza, and the Palestinian Authority. The article also referred incorrectly to Mr. Assaf’s travels to Cairo for “Arab Idol” auditions. The Sinai Desert is part of Egypt; he rode for hours through the Sinai from the border with Egypt, not to the border.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 12/9/13): Separately, Israel on Sunday blocked the installation of a high-tech cargo scanner donated by the Netherlands at the commercial crossing from Gaza into Israel, citing security concerns. The scanner was intended to increase Gaza exports to the West Bank.

Correction (Online as of 12/15/13): Earlier versions of this article incorrectly stated that Israel had blocked the installation of a high-tech cargo scanner donated by the Netherlands at the commercial crossing between Gaza and Israel. The scanner was installed several weeks ago and is being used on agricultural goods bound for Europe, but Israel has prevented its use for exports to Israel and the West Bank.



Error (New York Times, online slideshow photo caption, 12/7/2013): Bedouins and supporters protested last weekend against the plan to forcibly relocate about 70,000 residents from 35 recognized villages.

Correction (12/8/2013): An earlier version of this picture caption referred imprecisely to the number of Bedouins who are likely to be relocated against their will. It is some of the 70,000 Bedouins who are living in 35 unrecognized villages, not about 70,000.



Error (International New York Times, Mark Landler and Jodi Rudoren, 11/6/13): An absence of progress on the core issues, an ill-timed Israeli plan to build 3,500 more settlements on the West Bank and East Jerusalem. . .

Correction (11/7/13): An article on Wednesday about American efforts to reinvigorate the Middle East peace negotiations stated incorrectly that Israel plans to build 3,500 additional settlements on the West Bank and in East Jerusalem. Israel does not plan more settlements, but it has recently advanced projects for that number of new housing units within existing settlements.



Error (New York Times Web site, Thomas Erdbrink and Jodi Rudoren, 8/2/13): In 2005, Mr. Ahmadinejad was famously quoted as saying Israel must be “wiped off the map,” during a conference called “A world without Zionism.” While it later became clear from tapes of his remarks that he had actually said “Israel must vanish from the pages of history,” it made his international image as a staunch anti-Semitic hard-liner.

Correction (Updated Web story, print story, 8/3/13): Mr. Rouhani, who has sought to portray himself as a moderate, did not use the most inflammatory anti-Israeli invective sometimes heard from other Iranian leaders, most notably Mr. Rouhani’s predecessor, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who has called Israel a cancerous tumor, a virus and an aberration that should be expunged from history.

Fact: The New York Times, in reporting several years earlier about Ahmadinejad's comments, consulted translators who explained that "'wipe off' or 'wipe away' is more accurate than 'vanish' because the Persian verb is active and transitive."



Error (New York Times Web site, Thomas Erdbrink and Jodi Rudoren, 8/2/13): But on Friday, the country’s incoming president, Hassan Rowhani, struck a more moderate tone, by merely calling the Israeli occupation of Palestinian lands "a sore."

Correction (Updated story, print story, 8/3/13): ... Mr. Rouhani told state television that “a sore has been sitting on the body of the Islamic world for many years,” a reference to Israel.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Rudoren, 5/9/13): ... years of mounting tension and legal battles over the treatment of women in Israel's public sphere, particularly the requirement that they sit in the back on bus lines through ultra-Orthodox neighborhoods, which set off civil disobedience campaigns involving many Jews from overseas.

Correction (5/11/13): An article on Thursday about Israel’s moving to end gender segregation in public spaces and public activities misstated the current policy regarding such segregation on buses. Israel’s Supreme Court ruled in 2011 that men and women could sit separately on buses only if they did so voluntarily; women are no longer required to sit in the back of buses.

Fact: The article and the correction failed to note that, although there is on a few specific bus lines a tacit but unenforceable agreement that men and women sit separately, on the vast majority of buses that travel through ultra-Orthodox neighborhoods there is no such separation.

Error (New York Times, Jodi Ruderon and Mark Landler, 12/1/12): Construction in E1, in West Bank territory that Israel captured in the 1967 war, would connect the large Jewish settlement of Maale Adumim to Jerusalem, dividing the West Bank in two. The Palestinian cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem would be cut off from the capital, making the contiguous Palestinian state endorsed by the United Nations last week virtually impossible.

Correction (12/8/12): Because of an editing error, an article last Saturday about Israel’s decision to move forward with planning and zoning for settlements in an area east of Jerusalem known as E1 described imprecisely the effect of such development on access to the cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem from Jerusalem. While development of E1 would limit access to Ramallah and Bethlehem to narrow corridors far from the Old City and downtown Jerusalem, it would not completely separate those cities from Jerusalem.



Error (New York Times, Jodi Ruderon, 12/2/12): Construction in E1, in West Bank territory that Israel captured in the 1967 war, would connect the large Jewish settlement of Maale Adumim to Jerusalem, dividing the West Bank in two. The Palestinian cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem would be cut off from the capital, making the contiguous Palestinian state endorsed by the United Nations last week virtually impossible. . . Like E1, [construction in Givat Hamatos] too would be a roadblock to plans for a contiguous Palestinian state . .

Correction (12/16/12 (in print); 12/10/12 (online)): An article on Dec. 2 about Israel’s decision to move forward with planning and zoning for settlements in an area east of Jerusalem known as E1 described imprecisely the effect of such development on access to the cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem from Jerusalem, and on the West Bank. Development of E1 would limit access to Ramallah and Bethlehem, leaving narrow corridors far from the Old City and downtown Jerusalem; it would not completely cut off those cities from Jerusalem. It would also create a large block of Israeli settlements in the center of the West Bank; it would not divide the West Bank in two. And because of an editing error, the article referred incompletely to the possibility of a contiguous Palestinian state. Critics see E1 as a threat to the meaningful contiguity of such a state because it would leave some Palestinian areas connected by roads with few exits or by circuitous routes; the proposed development would not technically make a contiguous Palestinian state impossible.



Error (New York Times, Helene Cooper, 3/5/12): Mr. Obama, who has often lamented the United States invasion of Iraq in 2003, made reference to European and American intelligence assessments that have found no evidence that Iran has decided to pursue a nuclear weapon

Correction (3/13/12): Because of an editing error, an article on March 5 about President Obama’s speech to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee referred incorrectly to his comments about intelligence assessments of Iran’s ability to produce a nuclear weapon. Mr. Obama said, “The United States and Israel both assess that Iran does not yet have a nuclear weapon, and we are exceedingly vigilant in monitoring their program.” His speech did not mention some European intelligence reports that have said there is no evidence that Iran has made a final decision to pursue a nuclear weapon.



Error (New York Times, 8/18/10; International Herald Tribune, 8/19/10, Nada Bakri): While about 4.7 million refugees from the Arab-Israeli wars of 1948 and 1967 are spread across the region, many of them in the West Bank, Gaza, Jordan and Syria, the estimated 400,000 in Lebanon have endured some of the most wretched conditions.

Correction (8/21/10 in NY Times, 8/24/10 in Tribune): An article on Wednesday/Thursday [CAMERA notes: Wednesday was noted in the Times and Thursday in the IHT] about the passage of a law in Lebanon granting Palestinian refugees the same rights to work as other foreigners referred imprecisely to the refugees. Although the United Nations now registers about 4.7 million Palestinian refugees throughout the region, most are the descendants of the 700,000 who fled the Arab-Israeli war of 1948 and the 300,000 who fled in 1967.



Error (New York Times, Op-Ed by Rashid Khalidi, 1/8/09): This war on the people of Gaza isn't really about rockets. Nor is it about ''restoring Israel's deterrence,'' as the Israeli press might have you believe. Far more revealing are the words of Moshe Yaalon, then the Israeli Defense Forces chief of staff, in 2002: ''The Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people.''

Correction (Editors Note, 1/30/09): An Op-Ed article on Jan. 8, on misperceptions of Gaza, included an unverified quotation. A former Israeli Defense Forces chief of staff, Moshe Yaalon, was quoted as saying in 2002 that “the Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people.” This quotation, while cited widely, does not appear in the Israeli newspaper interview to which it is usually attributed. Its original source has not been found, and thus it should not have appeared in the article.



Error (New York Times, Robert Worth, 4/22/08): Yona Sabar, a professor of Semitic languages at the University of California, Los Angeles, said that today, Malula and its neighboring villages, Jabadeen and Bakhaa, represent "the last Mohicans" of Western Aramaic, which was the language Jesus spoke in Palestine two millenia ago.

Correction (6/20/08): The Malula Journal article on April 22, about efforts in the village of Malula, Syria, and two neighboring villages to preserve Aramaic, the language spoken by Jesus, referred incorrectly to the name of the region where Jesus spent most of his time. It was Galilee --- not Palestine, which derives from the word Palestina, the name that Roman conquerors gave to the region more than 100 years after Jesus's death. The error was pointed out by a reader in an e-mail message on Monday.



Error (New York Times, online letter by Alison Weir, 2/24/08): In our two-year study -- from Sept. 29, 2000, to Sept. 28, 2001, and in 2004 -- of The Times's coverage of Israel and Palestine, we discovered that the newspaper had covered Israeli children's deaths at a rate seven times greater than it reported on Palestinian children's deaths.

Correction (Online correction, 3/7/08): A letter online on Feb. 24 stated that a two-year study by If Americans Knew -- from Sept. 29, 2000, to Sept. 28, 2001, and in 2004 -- of The New York Times's coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict ''discovered that the newspaper had covered Israeli children's deaths at a rate seven times greater than it reported on Palestinian children's deaths.'' This study examined headlines or first paragraphs of news articles.

CAMERA (See here for more information.):  



Error (New York Times, photo caption, 2/7/08): Bat El Ifrah, 10, removed articles on Wednesday from her home in Sderot, Israel, as her family prepared to flee...Two children on a playground near the Gaza border were also wounded in the attack, which was in retaliation for an Israeli airstrike in southern Gaza that killed seven Hamas policemen. [emphasis added]

Correction (Corrections: For the Record, 2/11/08): A caption on Thursday with a photograph of a home in Israel hit by a Palestinian rocket described the events surrounding the attack imprecisely. While the rocket attack followed an Israeli airstrike in southern Gaza, it was not known whether it was in fact in retaliation for the airstrike.



Error (New York Times, Helene Cooper, news analysis, 11/29/07): Mr. Bush's speech ... was notable in that he explicitly took on only one of the core issues, the fate of Palestinian refugees, and, on that issue, sided with Israel.

Correction (12/14/07): A news analysis article on Nov. 29 about the diplomatic style of Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, including her handling of the Middle East, referred incorrectly to President Bush’s position on the fate of Palestinian refugees in his remarks on Nov. 27 at the Middle East peace conference in Annapolis, Md. While Mr. Bush called Israel “a homeland for the Jewish people,” this was an implicit support for Israel’s view that Palestinians should not be guaranteed a right of return to their former homes inside Israel. Mr. Bush did not “explicitly” take on that issue and side with Israel.



Error (New York Times, photo caption, 9/23/06): Supporters of Fatah rallied yesterday in Jabaliya in the northern Gaza Strip to protest the stance of Hamas leaders on recognizing Israel.

Correction (9/27/06): A picture caption on Saturday about an anti-Hamas rally in Gaza by supporters of the rival Palestinian group Fatah misstated the purpose of the rally. It was to protest what participants called an atmosphere of fear created by Hamas leaders, not over the stance of Hamas on recognizing Israel.



Error (New York Times, Steven Erlanger, 11/5/05): Israel began 10 days of commemorations on the 10th anniversary of the assassination of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin by a settler trying to block progress toward peace with the Palestinians.

Correction (11/9/05): A report in the the World Breifing column on Saturday about commemorations of the 10th anniversary of the assassination of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel misstated the assassin’s background. He was a militant Orthodox opponent of the government, not a settler.



Error (New York Times, Douglas Jehl, 8/1/05): The United States has long listed Syria as a sponsor of terrorism, though the State Department's annual report on terrorism notes that the Syrian government has not been implicated in a terrorist act since 1986, when its intelligence service was involved in the attempted bombing of a British Airways passenger jet.

Correction (8/2/2005): An article yesterday about the Bush administration's order for a freeze on assets controlled by two senior Syrian intelligence officials in American financial institutions misidentified the operator of the flight that was the target of an attempted bombing in which Syria was implicated in 1986. It was El Al, not British Airways.



Error (New York Times, Elisabeth Bumiller, 5/27/05): In a gesture to Palestinians, Mr. Bush used the news conference to restate a longstanding policy outlining what the United States expected of Israel. He said that included no expansion of Jewish settlements in the West Bank and the area around Jerusalem, a halt to construction of a barrier that would intrude into Palestinian territory, the removal of Israeli troops from the West Bank and an easing of checkpoints and roadblocks that disrupt life in the West Bank.

Correction (5/30/05): An article on Friday about President Bush’s meeting in Washington on Thursday with Mahmoud Abbas, the Palestinian president, paraphrased incorrectly from Mr. Bush’s remarks at a news conference regarding the barrier that Israel is building in the West Bank. He said the route should take into account the barrier’s impact on Palestinians not engaged in terrorist activities. He did not call for a halt to construction of a barrier that would intrude into Palestinian territory.



Error (New York Times, Neil MacFarquhar, 12/16/04): Economic issues here often come secondary to the emotional desire to see some sort of overall settlement that will return occupied lands, particularly the holy mosque in Jerusalem, and find some solution for millions of Palestinian refugees stuck for generations in camps.

Correction (1/27/05): A news analysis article on Dec. 16 about a thaw in relations between Egypt and Israel referred imprecisely to the numbers of Palestinian refugees living in refugee camps. Currently almost 4.2 million Palestinian refugees are officially registered, of whom 1.3 million live in camps, according to United Nations figures. The number of officially registered refugees passed one million in 1957; the camp population passed one million in 1995. Thus the number of Palestinian refugees who have lived in camps for generations is not in the millions. (Official refugee numbers do not reflect Palestinians who fled the West Bank during the 1967 war or their descendants, now believed to exceed 800,000; they are officially considered displaced persons.) The error was reported to The Times on Dec. 16; this correction was delayed for checking with several refugee organizations.



Error (New York Times, James Bennet, 4/14/04): Mr. Sharon wanted three commitments: backing for the Gaza withdrawal, American recognition that Israel would hold on to parts of the West Bank, and an American rejection of the right of millions of Palestinian refugees from the Arab-Israeli war of 1948 and their descendants to return to their lands in what is now Israel.

Correction (4/17/04): A news analysis article on Thursday about President Bush’s endorsement of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s plan to withdraw the Israelis from Gaza referred imprecisely to the number of Palestinian refugees for whom Arabs have demanded the “right of return.” The reference to millions encompassed not just Palestinian refugees from the Arab-Israel war of 1948 but also their descendants.



Error (New York Times, letter by Rhoda Shapiro of Encinitas, Calif., 3/23/04): The Israelis’ justification [for the killing of Ahmed Yassin], that he has been the cause of Jewish deaths, cannot be taken seriously when the largest military in the Middle East refuses to obey the rule of law. . . .

Correction (3/26/04): A letter on Tuesday about the killing of Sheik Ahmed Yassin, the founder of Hamas, referred incorrectly to the Israeli military. It is not the largest in the Middle East; some Arab countries and Iran have larger military forces.



Error (New York Times, Steven Weisman, 12/5/03): [Under the Geneva Accord,] Israelis would keep most of their settlements in the West Bank and Jerusalem.

Correction (12/12/03): An article last Friday about President Bush’s meeting with King Abdullah of Jordan misstated the effect that an unofficial peace plan drafted by Israelis and Palestinians, known as the Geneva plan, would have on Israeli settlements. Under that plan, Israel would give up most of the settlements in the West Bank, not keep them. But since the 400,000 Israelis in the West Bank and Jerusalem are concentrated in a few settlements and neighborhoods that Israel would keep under the plan, about 300,000 settlers would remain where they live.



Error (New York Times, Steven R. Weisman, 11/26/2003): The Bush administration, in a rare rebuke to Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, has decided to rescind $289.5 mllion in American-backed loan guarantees for Israel as a punishment for illegal construction activities in the West Bank, the Israeli Embassy announced Tuesday.

Correction (12/3/2003): An article last Wednesday about the decision by the Bush administration to cancel $289.5 million in American-backed loan guarantees for Israel referred incorrectly to West Bank construction activities that prompted it. Although federal law requires revoking loan guarantees to penalize certain construction deemed contrary to American policy, the United States does not define the activities as illegal.



Error (New York Times, Christopher Marquis, 10/16/03): Mr. Powell said he spoke with Israel's foreign minister, Silvan Shalom, and with Mr. Qurei on Wednesday. He called on both sides to end terrorism, but, in particular, he warned the Palestinians that their aspirations for statehood could be set back by violence.

Correction (10/18/03): An article on Wednesday about President Bush's condemnation of the assault that killed three Americans in Gaza referred imprecisely to comments by Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, who called the Israeli foreign minister and the Palestinian prime minister to express outrage. While he said he “made clear to them, in the strongest possible terms, the need to move urgently to end terrorism,” he did not call on “both” sides to end terrorism or otherwise suggest that Israel was supporting terrorist activities.



Error (New York Times, James Bennet, 8/31/03): While Hamas has not successfully sent suicide bombers into Israel from the Gaza Strip, it has repeatedly fired crude rockets over Gaza’s fenced boundary. The attacks have not caused any injuries, however.

Correction (9/3/03): Because of an editing error, an article on Sunday about Israeli tank and missile attacks that left two Palestinian militants and an 8-year-old Palestinian girl dead misstated the toll taken by crude rockets fired by Hamas over Gaza's fenced boundary. While they have indeed caused no injuries in recent days, rockets have damaged several homes and factories over the last 18 months, leaving Israelis suffering from shrapnel wounds, broken limbs, smoke inhalation and shock.



Error (New York Times, Ian Fisher, 6/10/03): To the angry Israeli settlers who live nearby, the downed tower was a frightening portent: that Mr. Sharon may be willing to bargain away the right they believe that Jews have to inhabit land in the West Bank and Gaza that was seized from Palestinians after the 1967 war.

Correction (6/11/03): An article yesterday about the dismantling of a rusty tower by an Israeli settlement in the West Bank as a gesture of compliance with the American-led peace initiative misstated the origin of Israeli control of the territory. During the 1967 war, Israel seized the West Bank from Jordan and took Gaza from Egypt, not from the Palestinians.



Error (New York Times, photo caption, 3/17/03): A photo taken by the International Solidarity Movement shows Rachel Corrie trying to talk to the driver of an Israeli bulldozer before it killed her.

Correction (3/26/03): A picture caption on March 17 with an article about an American protester who was crushed by an Israeli Army bulldozer in Gaza referred incorrectly to the bulldozer shown. It was one that the protester, Rachel Corrie, had earlier tried to stop from destroying a Palestinian home. It was not the one that killed her.



Error (New York Times, Ian Fisher, 11/21/02): But Turkish news reports quote investigators there as saying that Mr. Foqara confessed to planning to turn the plane around and crash it into Tel Aviv, the capital of Israel.

Correction (11/22/02): An article yesterday about a man accused of having tried to hijack an El Al plane en route to Istanbul from Tel Aviv referred incorrectly to Tel Aviv. It is not the capital of Israel; Jerusalem is.



Error (New York Times, Serge Schmemann, 8/15/02): Mr. Barghouti was first arrested and deported by the Israelis at the age of 16, but he returned to become president of the student body at Birzeit University, a hotbed of Palestinian nationalism in the West Bank. That led to another deportation, from which he returned in 1993. . .

Correction (9/17/02 ): An article on June 14 about potential successors to Yasir Arafat and one on Aug. 15 about the indictment of Marwan Barghouti, a Palestinian leader who is being tried by Israel on murder charges, misstated the history of his arrests and deportation. He was first arrested in 1978 at the age of 19, not 16. He was deported once, in 1987, not twice, and returned to the West Bank in 1994, not 1993. (A reader reported the errors by e-mail on Sept. 2; this correction was delayed for fact checking.)



Error (New York Times, Serge Schmemann, 7/14/02): They [Palestinians] voted for Yasir Arafat in 1997 because he was their national symbol. . .

Correction (7/21/02): A brief article last Sunday introducing a photo essay about Palestinians and their views about the United States and reform in the Palestinian Authority misstated the date Yasir Arafat was elected as the Palestinians’ president. It was 1996, not 1997.



Error (New York Times on the web, headline, 6/24/02): Israel Asked to Halt Settlements and Pull Back Troops

Correction (6/24/02): Bush Demands Arafat’s Ouster Before U.S. Backs a New State; A New Condition for Palestinians Is Set by Bush



Error (New York Times on the web, David Stout, 6/24/02): [Mr. Bush] called on Israel to stop building settlements in Gaza and the West Bank and eventually pull back to the boundaries it held before its triumph in the 1967 war.

Correction (6/24/02): Ultimately, the president suggested, Israel should withdraw from much of the land occupied since 1967.



Error (New York Times, James Bennet and John Kifner, 6/14/02): He [Marwan Barghouti] logged six years in Israel prisons, even before his recent arrest, having first been arrested by Israel at 16. He was deported in 1978. He returned five years later.

Correction (9/17/02): An article on June 14 about potential successors to Yasir Arafat and one on Aug. 15 about the indictment of Marwan Barghouti, a Palestinian leader who is being tried by Israel on murder charges, misstated the history of his arrests and deportation. He was first arrested in 1978 at the age of 19, not 16. He was deported once, in 1987, not twice, and returned to the West Bank in 1994, not 1993. (A reader reported the errors by e-mail on Sept. 2; this correction was delayed for fact checking.)



Error (New York Times, John Kifner, 5/29/02): This afternoon the army was digging a huge ditch enclosed by barbed wire coils piled high to form a barrier between Bethlehem and Gilo, a nearby East Jerusalem neighborhood, where a sprawling Jewish area has been built on land seized after the war of 1967.

Correction (6/5/02): An article last Wednesday about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict misstated the location of Gilo, a Jewish neighborhood built on land captured by Israel in the 1967 Middle East war. It is in southern Jerusalem, not East Jerusalem.



Error (New York Times, front page photo, 5/6/02): The photo prominently depicts anti-Israel protesters with a large sign "End Israeli Occupation." Pro-Israel supporters with Israeli flags are less visible in the background.

Correction (Editor’s Note: 5/7/02): An article yesterday about a parade in Manhattan marking Israel’s 54th anniversary reported that 100,000 people had registered to march and hundreds of thousands more lined Fifth Avenue in support. The article also said that anti-Israel protesters numbered in the hundreds. A front-page photograph, however, showed the parade in the background, with anti-Israel protesters prominent in the foreground, holding a placard that read, "End Israeli Occupation of Palestine." Inside the newspaper, a photo of a pro-Israel marcher was juxtaposed with a picture of protesters, one waving a sign that likened Zionism to Nazism. Although the editors’ intent in each case was to note the presence of opposing sides, the effect was disproportionate. In fairness the total picture presentation should have better reflected The Times’s reporting on the scope of the event, including the disparity in the turnouts.



Error (New York Times , Week in Review chart, 3/3/02): Chart indicates that Israel’s population of those under five years old is 264,000.

Correction (3/17/02): A chart on March 3 showing comparative statistics for Israel and the West Bank and the Gaza Strip misstated the population of children under 5 in Israel. It is 614,000, not 264,000.



Error (New York Times, photo caption, 10/16/01): Israeli soldiers spray-painted graffiti on Palestinian homes before pulling out of Hebron on Monday.

Correction (10/18/01): A picture caption on Tuesday with an article about Israeli troops’ withdrawal from Palestinian-controlled areas of Hebron referred incorrectly in some editions to Israelis who had spray-painted graffiti on homes. They were Israeli settlers, not Israeli soldiers.



Error (New York Times, William Orme, 7/12/01): Though Palestinians have made no fatal attacks on Israelis in the last several days, Mr. Peres said he did not believe the Palestinians were yet making the requisite ‘100 percent effort’ to control violence.

Correction (7/14/01): An article on Thursday about Foreign Minister Shimon Peres’s views on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict misstated the extent of recent violence by Palestinians. There had in fact been a fatal attack by Palestinians on an Israeli in the previous several days; an Israeli officer died after a bomb exploded under his vehicle Sunday night.



Error (New York Times, Alessandra Stanley, 5/7/2001): On Monday the pope plans to deliver a prayer for peace at Quneitra, a city on the Golan Heights that was captured by Israel during the June 1967 Arab-Israeli war and destroyed just before the area was returned under a 1974 agreement. Syria has left it ruined as a museum of Israeli aggression.

Correction (5/9/2001): An article on Monday about the visit of Pope John Paul II to Syria referred imprecisely to the destruction in the Golan Heights city of Quneitra, where he has since delivered a prayer for peace. The city was captured by Israel during the 1967 Arab-Israeli war. It is the Syrians who contend that the Israelis used dynamite and bulldozers to level the town before they left in 1974. Israel says the damage was a byproduct of fighting in the wars of 1967 and 1973.



Error (New York Times, Deborah Sontag, 3/28/01): Miki Levy, the Jerusalem police chief, said that a suicide bomber wearing an explosive belt had blown himself up while standing beside a bus headed for the settlement of Pisgat Zeev.

Correction (4/2/01): An article on March 28 about pressure on Prime Minister Ariel Sharon to retaliate against Palestinians for attacks on Israelis referred imprecisely to Pisgat Zeev, a Jewish neighborhood built in 1984, which was the destination of a bus attacked by a Palestinian suicide bomber. While the Palestinians consider it a settlement, the Israelis say it is part of municipal Jerusalem.



Error (New York Times, 2/17/01): Headline: Rocket Kills Israeli Soldier in Lebanon. Caption: An Israeli who was wounded yesterday when a Hezbollah rocket hit an Israeli military vehicle in Lebanon.

Correction (2/21/01): An article on Sunday reported the killing of an Israeli soldier by Hezbollah guerillas in the disputed Shabaa Farms area, controlled by Israel. The headline and the picture caption said that the attack occurred in Lebanon. That is the contention of the Hezbollah guerillas, who say Israel is illegally occupying the 10 square miles at the far southeastern corner of Lebanon. But the United Nations has agreed with Israel that compliance with Security Council Resolution 425, which called for the Israelis’ withdrawal from Lebanon, need not entail giving up Shabaa Farms, which they captured in 1967. The headline and the caption should have used impartial terminology, as the article did.



Error (New York Times, Susan Sachs, 11/13/00): Jerusalem, once controlled by Jordan and conquered by Israel in 1967, contains sites that Jews, Muslims and Christians consider holy and is at the heart of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

Correction (11/15/00): An article on Monday about a meeting of Muslim countries in Qatar at which Israel was denounced misstated the extent of Jordan’s control of Jerusalem before the 1967 Middle East war. Jordan controlled only East Jerusalem and the Old City; Israel controlled the rest of Jerusalem.



Error (New York Times, Deborah Sontag, 9/6/00): Mr. Arafat, the experts say, has been putting forth the compromise position of United Nations resolutions that call for Israeli withdrawal from all territory occupied in the 1967 war – which includes all of East Jerusalem.

Correction (9/8/00): An article on Wednesday about the Middle East peace talks referred incorrectly to United Nations resolutions on the Arab-Israeli conflict. While Security Council Resolution 242, passed after the 1967 Middle East War, calls for Israel’s armed forces to withdraw "from territories occupied in the recent conflict," no resolution calls for Israeli withdrawal from all territory, including East Jerusalem, occupied in the war.



Error (New York Times, John Burns, 8/25/00): The surprise, and uncertainty about Barak’s motives, were all the greater for the fact that it was only 15 months ago that he won a landslide victory in Israel’s first direct election contest for the post of prime minister.

Correction (8/26/00): A front-page article yesterday about a coalition proposal by Prime Minister Ehud Barak of Israel referred incorrectly to the history of direct elections for his office. The 1996 election, won by Benjamin Netanyahu, was the first in which Israelis voted directly for prime minister. The election won by Mr. Barak last year was the second.



Error (New York Times, John Burns, 8/19/00): Mr. Arafat has toured more than 20 capitals in the Arab world, Europe and Asia since the Camp David talks, seeking backing for his position that Israel must accept United Nations resolutions passed after the Arab-Israeli war in 1967 and hand over all of east Jerusalem, including the Jewish quarter, to a future Palestinian state.

Correction (8/24/00): An article on Aug. 19 about efforts by the American envoy Dennis Ross to revive Israeli-Palestinian talks misstated terms of United Nations Security Council resolutions passed after the 1967 Middle East war. While Resolution 242 called for Israel’s armed forces to withdraw "from territories occupied in the recent conflict," no resolution called for Israel to hand over all of east Jerusalem to a future Palestinian state.



Error (New York Times, John Burns, 8/17/00): The aim of the accords was to reach a final agreement within seven years that would settle contentious issues like Jerusalem, and seal Israeli and Palestinian recognition of each other’s sovereignty and border.

Correction (8/24/00): An article on Aug. 17 about a decision by Palestinian leaders to reassess their plan to declare statehood on Sept. 13 misstated the timetable for an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement under the Oslo accords of 1993. The accords spelled out a five-year interim process; they did not specify a seven-year goal for a final agreement.



Error (New York Times, Jane Perlez, 7/20/00): It was in these Stockholm talks that some progress was made in defining the territorial shape of a Palestinian state and what might be a possible solution to dealing with the three million Palestinian refugees who were forced to leave Israel after the 1948 Arab-Israeli war and have since been scattered around the Middle East.

Correction (7/21/00): An article yesterday about President Clinton’s decision to hold a Middle East summit meeting at Camp David misstated the number of Palestinian refugees who fled Israel after the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. The United Nations estimated that 725,000 Arabs fled Palestine or Israel between April and December 1948. (Israel declared independence in May 1948.) The number of refugees was not three million.



Error (New York Times, 7/11/00): The Palestinians want a settlement based on United Nations Resolution 242, which calls for an end to Israeli occupation of the entire West Bank and Gaza, seized in the 1967 war.

Correction (7/14/00): The chart on Tuesday listing issues to be discussed in the Middle East peace talks at Camp David referred incorrectly to Resolution 242 of the United Nations Security Council, which was approved after the Middle East war of 1967. It calls for the withdrawal of Israeli armed forces "from territories occupied in the recent conflict"; it is the Palestinians who associate that language with the West Bank and the Gaza Strip.



Error (New York Times, photo caption, 3/15/00): Classmates of a girl killed by Israeli shelling of Mansuri in southern Lebanon at her funeral.

Correction (3/17/00): A photo caption on Wednesday about Israeli air raids on Lebanon misidentified the force whose shelling killed a student in southern Lebanon. It was the South Lebanon Army, a militia backed by Israel that was attacking the area along with Israeli forces, not the Israeli military.