Media Corrections

Accuracy and accountability are among the most important tenets of journalism. In combination, they mean media organizations are expected to publish or broadcast forthright corrections after sharing inaccurate information. The following corrections are among the many prompted by CAMERA’s communication with reporters and editors.

 

DPA Corrects Captions: Rocket Attacks On Israel Are Actual, Not Alleged

CAMERA prompts correction of numerous Deutsche Presse-Agentur photo captions today which erroneously referred to hundreds of rocket attacks on Israel as "alleged," as if it wasn't yet certain that Gaza terrorists have carried out hundreds of these attacks since yesterday morning.

In New York Times Israel Coverage, Anything Goes

A photo caption misidentifies a billboard showing the Prime Minister alongside far-right politicians as "a campaign ad for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his right-wing allies." In fact, it's an ad for the competing Blue and White party, keen to paint Netanyahu as a close ally of extremists.

In Rafi Eitan Obit, New York Times Casts Unproven Uranium Allegation As Fact

Foreign Policy labeled the disappearance of enriched uranium decades ago from a Pennsylvania facility "one of the most confounding puzzles of the nuclear era" despite investigations involving CIA, Congress, FBI and others. But The New York Times states as fact: Rafi Eitan played an important role. UPDATE: Times corrects: "that allegation was never proved."