New York Times

The New York Times, one of the most influential newspapers in the world, not only influences its readers but also has significant impact on the news judgment and editorial perspective of other media. The caliber of accuracy, balance and thoroughness in this publication are therefore of particular importance.

 

 

Contact the newsroom: nytnews@nytimes.com

 


 


Media Mislead on Palestinian Elections and Israel’s Oslo Obligations

With Abbas' cancellation of elections on the pretext that Israel has not said it will permit voting in eastern Jerusalem, some reports mislead on Israel's Oslo-mandated responsibilities concerning Palestinian elections. As for Palestinian electoral responsibilities under Oslo, those simply aren't on the radar.

New York Times on Ramadan Events in Israel

The New York Times, once priding itself as the “paper of record,” is better recognized today as the “paper of advocacy.” Rather than documenting the various factors contributing to the unrest in Israel during Ramadan, it ignored rocketing from Gaza, emphasizing instead what could be blamed on Israeli Jews.
MODERNA COVID-19 Vaccine

Israel is Obligated to Vaccinate the Palestinians – and Other Myths

After Israel arranged to get early access to enough COVID-19 vaccine for its entire population, outlets like the New York Times and human rights groups like Amnesty International mangled international law and the Oslo Accords to argue that Israel must also vaccinate Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza.

NY Times Casts Haganah, Defenders of Jewish Community, as Anti-Arab

In 1920, the vulnerable Jewish minority in Palestine formed the Haganah, an underground self-defense organization, after concluding the British authorities weren’t particularly interested in protecting Jews against Arab attackers. Or in New York Times speak: the Haganah was “an underground military organization sometimes battling alongside the colonizing British against the Arabs.”

The Stories Children (and The New York Times) Tell

"Emotional stories" of Palestinian children "crossing the checkpoint on the bus ride in from East Jerusalem to West Jerusalem" are just that: emotional stories. The non-existence of the checkpoint in question begs the question: Did the children really tell the stories, or was that an embellishment on the part of the adult author, Ruth Ebenstein?