Media Corrections

Accuracy and accountability are among the most important tenets of journalism. In combination, they mean media organizations are expected to publish or broadcast forthright corrections after sharing inaccurate information. The following corrections are among the many prompted by CAMERA’s communication with reporters and editors.

 

Ray Hanania Responds to CAMERA Critique

Ray Hanania is a syndicated columnist whose articles regularly appear in the Chicago Daily Herald. CAMERA has frequently received complaints about the writer's work and has, on occasion, published critiques of it. Below is Mr. Hanania's response to a CAMERA critique:

CAMERA Obtains Correction at LA Times

CAMERA has obtained the following correction from the Los Angeles Times:

Jewish settlements - An article in Saturday's Section A about the Israeli foreign minister's visit to Washington misstated a commitment Prime Minister Ariel Sharon made at a June summit in Aqaba, Jordan. Sharon agreed to dismantle some illegal outposts of Jewish settlements; he did not agree to begin dismantling settlements themselves.

Dissembling Demolitions

Why do photo services feature images of forlorn Palestinian children scampering across rubble if the structures were uninhabited?

CAMERA Obtains Correction at New York Times

CAMERA has obtained the following correction from the <I>New York Times</I>:

Correction (12/12/03): An article last Friday about President Bush's meeting with King Abdullah of Jordan misstated the effect that an unofficial peace plan drafted by Israelis and Palestinians, known as the Geneva plan, would have on Israeli settlements. Under that plan, Israel would give up most of the settlements in the West Bank, not keep them. But since the 400,000 Israelis in the West Bank and Jerusalem are concentrated in a few settlements and neighborhoods that Israel would keep under the plan, about 300,000 settlers would remain where they live.</P>

CAMERA Obtains Clarification from Boston Globe

CAMERA has obtained the following clarification from the Boston Globe:

Clarification (12/11/03): A Dec. 3 column by Tom Wallace stated that the security fence in Israel will confiscate 55 percent of the West Bank. This is a projection by Gush Shalom and other peace groups. The United Nations estimates less than 20 percent of the West Bank will be on the Israeli side of the fence.

CAMERA Obtains Correction at New York Times

CAMERA has obtained the following correction from the New York Times:

Correction (12/3/2003): An article last Wednesday about the decision by the Bush administration to cancel $289.5 million in American-backed loan guarantees for Israel referred incorrectly to West Bank construction activities that prompted it. Although federal law requires revoking loan guarantees to penalize certain construction deemed contrary to American policy, the United States does not define the activities as illegal.

UPDATED: Finally Getting It Straight at Lawrence Eagle-Tribune

A headline in the Lawrence Eagle-Tribune erroneously suggested that Israeli troops carelessly killed a Palestinian child when, in fact, Israeli troops destroyed the home of a Palestinian gunman who had killed an Israeli baby. Apparently, the headline writer's operating assumption was that when it comes to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and a dead baby, the Israelis are culpable and the tiny victim is, of course, Palestinian. No matter what the articles themselves say.

UPDATED: New York Times Wrongly Claims No Injuries From Qassam Rockets

In a report published today ("Israeli Strikes Kill 2 Militants and a Girl"), New York Times correspondent James Bennet mistakenly asserted that no Israelis had been injured in Qassam rocket attacks. Contrary to the Times' claim, a number of Israelis, including infants, have been seriously wounded by Qassam rockets.