Monday, September 22, 2014
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Corrected

Haaretz

Error (Haaretz, blog live update, 6/22/14): A Palestinian armed with a grenade was apprehended by security forces near the settlement of Sde Avraham.

Correction (6/22/14): A Palestinian armed with a grenade was apprehended by security forces near Sde Avraham, an Israeli community near the Gaza Strip.



Error (Haaretz, headline, 5/19/14): Lag Ba'omer in Hebron: Settlers torch Palestinian orchard

Correction (5/20/14): The headline of an article by Yair Ettinger and Amira Hass in yesterday's paper was incorrect. It should have read: "Lag Ba'Omer in Hebron: Settlers light bonfire in Palestinian orchard."



Error (Haaretz, Op-Ed, Nicolas Pelham, 5/12/14): The Knesset bans Christmas trees, which sprout all over Palestine, from its premises.

Correction (Online as of 5/12/14, not in print): The Knesset bans Christmas trees which sprout all over Palestine from public display on its premises.



Error (Haaretz, headline, 5/5/14): Netanyahu: Israel is home of one people -- the Jewish people

Correction (5/8/14): The headline of an article by Barak Ravid ("Netanyahu: Israel is home to one people -- Jewish," [sic] May 5), incorrectly translated the prime minister's comments at the weekly cabinet meeting. Netanyahu said that Israel "is the nation-state of one people -- the Jewish people," as the body of the article accurately reported.



Error (Haaretz, photo caption, 4/25/14): A Palestinian woman at the West Bank separation barrier near the Israeli city of Modi'in.

Correction (4/28/14): The caption accompanying an article by Peter Beinart's ("A simple lesson for Israel," April 25) incorrectly identified the Israeli city seen in the background of the West Bank separation barrier. The city in question is Modi'in Ilit.



Error (Haaretz, Judy Maltz, 4/23/14): For the past quarter of a century, Tanya's mother has been at the forefront of the battle to grant women the right to pray as they see fit at the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site.

Correction: For the past quarter of a century, Tanya’s mother has been at the forefront of the battle to grant women the right to pray as they see fit at the Western Wall, one of Judaism’s holiest sites.



Error (Haaretz, Judy Maltz, 4/8/14): It was Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu who tapped Sharansky for the job, under pressure from world Jewish leaders upset by the scenes of women in prayer shawls being detained by police at Judaism’s holiest site.

Correction (Online as of 4/8/14): It was Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu who tapped Sharansky for the job, under pressure from world Jewish leaders upset by the scenes of women in prayer shawls being detained by police at one of Judaism’s holiest sites.



Error (Haaretz, subheadline, 4/8/14): A look at 10 key players in the dramatic, but ultimately abortive, plan to integrate women's prayer into Judaism's holiest site.

Correction (Online as of 4/8/14): A look at 10 key players in the dramatic, but ultimately abortive, plan to integrate women's prayer into one of Judaism's holiest sites.



Error (Haaretz, Jack Khoury and Reuters, 3/10/14): Benjamin Netanyahu has been Israel's first prime minister to make recognition of his country as a Jewish state a requirement for peace.

Correction (3/12/14): An article in Ha'aretz ("Arab League backs Abbas' refusal to recognize Israel as a Jewish state," Jack Khoury and Reuters, March 10), incorrectly stated that Benjamin Netanyahu was the first Israeli prime minister to demand Palestinian recognition of Israel as the Jewish state as a condition to peace talks. In fact, a similar demand was made by Ehud Olmert.



Error (Haaretz, Kobi Niv, Op-Ed, 2/17/14): . . where would you find a black woman at the interdisciplinary college of the moneyed and political aristocracy in Herzliya?

Correction (2/20/14): Contrary to what was implied in Kobi Niv's opinion piece ("The right anti-Semitism," February 17), the Interdisciplinary Center, Herzilya indeed has Ethiopian Jewish students, as well as students from Eritrea, South Sudan, Togo and other countries. For the past several years the IDC has run a program called Israel at Heart, in which dozens of Ethiopian-Israelis are enrolled each year.



Error (Ha'aretz, Op-Ed, Shlomo Avineri, 12/9/13): Mandela's reply was, as usual, polite and dignified, but was essentially evasive. He expressed thanks for the invitation, but said that it was premature to visit Israel. He did not elaborate and never visited Israel.

Correction (Online 12/10/13): This article has been amended to reflect the fact that Mandela did visit Israel in 1999.



Error (Ha'aretz, Op-Ed, Moshe Arens, 12/2/13): [EU bureaucrats] have succeeded in imposing on Israel their demand that scientific cooperation of Israeli scientists with EU scientists, within the framework of the Horizon 2020 program, will be limited to those Israeli scientists who do not reside beyond the 1949 armistice lines or are not associated with institutions located there.

Correction (12/5/13): The article "Science in service of politicians" by Moshe Arens, which was published on Dec. 2, 2013, should have stated that funding limitations in the EU's Horizon 2020 initiative apply to research institutions. They do not apply to individual scientists residing beyond the 1949 armistice lines, as was mistakenly stated.



Error (Ha'aretz, Barak Ravid and Jonathan Lis, 10/28/13): The Prime Minister’s Office stated that all of the prisoners slated for release were involved in attacks before the Oslo Accords were signed, and all received sentences of between 17 and 27 years in prison.

Correction (10/29/13): Due to a translation error, an article by Barak Ravid and Jonathan Lis ("Ministers approve release of 26 Palestinian prisoners for peace talks," October 28) incorrectly stated the length of the sentences handed to the 26 Palestinians due to be released this week. They were all sentenced to life terms or at least 30 years.



Error (Ha'aretz, Amy Klein, 10/24/13): Nor did [the Israeli fans] care when in “Pour it Up,” instead of the lyrics “All I see is signs / All I see is dollar signs,” she subbed in “All I see is Palestine,” . . .

Correction (10/25/13): An article in Haaretz yesterday ("All Rihanna sees 'is Palestine,' TA fans unfazed," by Amy Klein) incorrectly stated that singer Rihanna changed the lyrics to a song she performed in Tel Aviv on Tuesday to include a reference to Palestine. Upon reviewing video footage of the show posted after publication, we have retracted this assertion.



Error (Ha'aretz, Gili Cohen, 9/23/13): For the first time in six years, construction materials like cement and steel were allowed in Gaza yesterday.

Correction (10/18/13): An article by Gili Cohen in Haaretz English Edition ("Cement enters Gaza Strip legally for first time in six years," September 23) incorrectly asserted that Israel has barred the import of cement and steel to the Gaza Strip since 2007. The report should have stated that Israel has further eased restriction on the import of these materials to the Gaza Strip.



Error (Ha'aretz6/30/13): Canceling a scheduled trip to Abu Dhabi, Kerry flew from Jerusalem to Amman for another meeting with Abbas, followed by a third meeting, in Tel Aviv, with Netanyahu.

Correction (7/1/13): Due to an editing error, an article published on June 30 ("Kerry's shuttle diplomacy yet to yield solid results") reported that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu met with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Tel Aviv. All three of their meetings took place in Jerusalem.



Error (Ha'aretz, 6/6/13): The Palestinian teenager, now 19 years old, was raped six years ago by four Palestinian youths near the West Bank's Hizma roadblock, near Jerusalem.

Correction (6/14/13): In the article "Judge who said 'some girls enjoy rape' resigns, loses PM's support for Likud post" (June 6, 2013), the rape victim was mistakenly identified as a Palesitnian. The victim is an Israeli citizen who had returned to the court with the goal of being recognized by the Defense Ministry as a victim of terror.



Error (Ha'aretz, Yair Ettinger, 5/10/13): Just Tuesday, the Temple Mount was the site of violent riots, when 200 Jews were permitted to enter the holy site to pray in honor of Jerusalem Day.

Correction (5/16/13): Due to a translation error, two recent articles ("Jordan grills Israeli ambassador following Temple Mount rioting," May 9, and "Women of Wall, Haredi girls to face off at Kotel," May 10) incorrectly stated that police allowed worshippers to enter the Temple Mount to pray. By Israeli law, Jews are not permitted to pray on the Temple Mount.



Error (Ha'aretz, Barak Ravid, 5/9/13): The rioting ensued Tuesday after the police allowed some 200 Jews to enter the Temple Mount to pray in honor of Jerusalem Day.

Correction (5/16/13): Due to a translation error, two recent articles ("Jordan grills Israeli ambassador following Temple Mount rioting," May 9, and "Women of Wall, Haredi girls to face off at Kotel," May 10) incorrectly stated that police allowed Jewish worshippers to enter the Temple Mount to pray. By Israeli law, Jews are not permitted to pray on the Temple Mount.



Error (Ha'aretz, Photo caption, 5/6/13): Palestinians throwing rocks in the West Bank on Saturday.

Correction (5/9/13): A caption accompanying a photograph that was published on Page 4 of Haaretz on May 6 incorrectly identified stone-throwing youths. The photograph depicted both Israeli and Palestinian youths, not just Palestinian youths. Additionally, the incident in question took place on Friday, May 3 and not as published.



Error (Ha'aretz, Jack Khoury, 4/23/13): During the hearing, which took place next door to [Samer] Issawi's hospital room, he stood up and removed his clothes. He looked very thin and skeleton-like, according to witnesses present at the hearing. "You showed this look a few days ago when you showed the victims of the Holocaust," Issawi then told the hearing, referring to Holocaust Remembrance Day earlier this month.

 
People who attended the meeting said that Kaufmann and the military prosecutors were shocked at how Issawi looked and agreed with the comparison.


Correction (4/24/13): Jack Khoury's article on April 23 ("Palestinian hunger striker refuses to participate in trial") contained a translation error. It should have stated that people who attended Samer Issawi's hearing said that Judge Dalia Kaufmann and the military prosecutors were shocked both by Issawi's appearance and by the comparison he made between his appearance and that of a Holocaust survivor.



Error (Ha'aretz, Gili Cohen, 4/3/13): Every professional army officer who does not serve in a front-line unit must spend one week a year protecting these [illegal outpost] settlements.

Correction (4/5/13): An article by Gili Cohen ("IDF regularly deploys soldiers to guard one-quarter of illegal West Bank outposts," April 4), should have stated that every professional army officer who does not serve in a front-line unit must spend one week protecting vulnerable communities on both sides of the Green Line. The original version included a translation of the Hebrew term "yishuvim" as "settlements."



Error (Ha'aretz, Op-Ed, Gideon Levy, 3/31/13): Amnesty International, for instance, enumerated only 92 Palestinian fighters among the dead [in Operation Cast Lead.]

Correction (4/4/13): An article by Gideon Levy ("Deadly turning point," Haaretz, March 31) incorrectly quoted a Amnesty International report as saying that "92 Palestinian fighters were killed during Operation Cast Lead." This figure does not appear in the report.



Error (Ha'aretz, Zvi Bar'el, 2/27/13): [Shin Bet chief Yoram] Cohen is the man who decided whether to arrest Samer Issawi last August after he had been released in the deal in which abducted soldier Gilad Shalit was exchanged for 477 Palestinian prisoners.

Correction (2/28/13): An article by Zvi Bar'el ("Israel's seventh gatekeeper," Haaretz, February 27) incorrectly stated the number of Palestinian prisoners freed as part of the Shalit exchange deal. The correct number is 1,027.

Error (Ha'aretz, Zvi Bar'el, Op-Ed, 2/27/13): [Shin Bet chief Yoram] Cohen is the man who decided whether to arrest Samer Issawi last August after he had been released in the deal in which abducted soldier Gilad Shalit was exchanged for 477 Palestinian prisoners.

Correction (Online as of 2/27/12): Cohen is the man who decided whether to arrest Samer Issawi last August after he had been released as part of the Shalit exchange deal.



Error (Ha'aretz, Chaim Levinson and Barak Ravid, 1/14/13): The evacuation -- which involved about 500 police and Israel Defense Forces soldiers -- was carried out despite a temporary injunction issued by the High Court of Justice preventing the state from evacuating the encampment for six days, pending deliberations.

Correction (2/7/13): In the article "Troops evacuate Palestinians from E-1 tent protest despite court injunction," by Chaim Levinson and Barak Ravid, it should have been made clear that the court injunction referred to tents rather than the protesters.



Error (Ha'aretz, Chaim Levinson and Jack Khoury, 1/16/13): The incidents came a day after Israeli soldiers shot and killed a Palestinian man in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya near the border with Israel. Gazan officials said Mustafa Abu Jarad, 21, was a farmer. He was taken to Shifa hospital, where doctors said he died from his wounds.

Correction (Online as of 1/24/13): The incidents came a day after Palestinian sources said that Israeli soldiers shot and killed a Palestinian man in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya near the border with Israel. Gazan officials said Mustafa Abu Jarad, 21, was a farmer. He was taken to Shifa hospital, where doctors said he died from his wounds. The IDF denied involvement in the incident.



Error (Ha'aretz, Chaim Levinson and Jack Khoury, 1/16/13): The incidents came a day after Israeli soldiers shot and killed a Palestinian man in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya near the border with Israel. Gazan officials said Mustafa Abu Jarad, 21, was a farmer. He was taken to Shifa hospital, where doctors said he died from his wounds.

Correction (2/7/13): In the article "IDF kills fourth Palestinian in a week," by Jack Khoury and Chaim Levinson, published on January 16, the reported shooting death of a Palestinian man by Israeli forces should have been attributed to Palestinian sources. It should also have been noted that the IDF denied involvement in the incident.



Error (Ha'aretz, Anshel Pfeffer, 11/23/12): . . . Egyptian Prime Minister Hisham Kandil, during his visit on Friday to Gaza, posed for a joint photograph with Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh, holding together the body of a dead baby boy killed in an Israeli air strike.

Correction (Online as of 11/28/12): . . . Egyptian Prime Minister Hisham Kandil, during his visit on Friday to Gaza, posed for a joint photograph with Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh, holding together the body of a dead baby boy, the circumstances of whose death are the subject of much debate, with evidence emerging that he was not killed in an Israeli air strike, as the Palestinians claim, but by an errant missile fired from inside Gaza.



Error (Ha'aretz, photo caption, 5/16/12): Palestinians clashing with IDF forces in Ramallah yesterday

Correction (5/17/12): A photograph in Haaretz on May 16 incorrectly identified the location of clashes between Palestinians and IDF soldiers. The incident took place at the Ofer detention center, on the outskirts of Ramallah, and not as published.



Error (Ha'aretz, Talila Nesher, 5/10/12): In January, the High Court of Justice upheld the controversial Nakba Law passed by the Knesset in March, which fines bodies who openly reject Israel as a Jewish state.

Correction (5/11/12): An article by Talila Nesher ("Tel Aviv University students to mark Nakba Day on campus," May 9) incorrectly stated which bodies are affected by the Nakba Law. The law applies to bodies that receive state funding and not as published.

CAMERA: In addition, the law does not allow for a fine. Rather, it enables the Finance Minister to withhold state funds budgeted to the body.



Error (Ha'aretz, Karni Eldad, Op-Ed, 3/25/12): Jewish settlement in Judea and Samaria can be broken down into a number of periods - the settlement period, during which dozens of communities were established (mostly under the Labor Party, and much of it due to President Shimon Peres ); the agricultural period, during which settlers took over land, expelled, planted and sowed . . .

Correction (3/26/12): Due to a translation error, one phrase in an opinion piece by Karni Eldad ("Agricultural apartheid," March 25) was incorrect. The phrase in question should have read: "the agricultural period, during which settlers took over land, cleared stones, planted and sowed."



Error (Ha'aretz, Op-Ed, 10/3/11): It's a fact: From the moment Kaniuk learned of the judge's ruling on the eve of Rosh Hashanah until the news was reported in the newspapers, several outstanding Jews (in their own opinion), residents of the West Bank settlement of Anatot, managed to demonstrate how easily Judaism can be turned into a loaded pistol aimed at the goyim, when they went out, as is their custom, to enhance the joy of the holiday by engaging in a pogrom against Palestinians and the peace activists who came to their assistance.

Correction (10/7/11): In the article by Neri Livneh ("A new movement?" October 3), it was erroneously implied that residents of the Anatot settlement have participated in attacks against peace activists and Palestinians in the past.



Error (Ha'aretz, Barak Ravid, 8/20/11): Cohen presented Egyptian officials with Defense Minister Ehud Barak's statement, released earlier Saturday, in which Barak expressed regret over the deaths of three Egyptian policemen from Israel Defence Forces fire on Thursday.

Correction (Posted online as of 8/26/11): Cohen presented Egyptian officials with Defense Minister Ehud Barak's statement, released earlier Saturday, in which Barak expressed regret over the deaths of three Egyptian policemen on Thursday.



Error (Ha'aretz, Anshel Pfeffer and Barak Ravid, 8/20/11): Defense Minister Ehud Barak said on Saturday that Israel regrets the death of three Egyptian policemen who were killed by Israel Defence Forces soldiers on Thursday.

Correction (Posted online as of 8/26/11): Defense Minister Ehud Barak said on Saturday that Israel regrets the deaths of three Egyptian policemen who were killed on Thursday.



Error (Ha'aretz, subheadline, 8/20/11): Defense Minister Ehud Barak says that Israel regrets the deaths of Egyptian policemen who were killed by IDF fire during Thursday's terror attacks near Eilat

Correction (Posted online as of 8/26/11): Defense Minister Ehud Barak said on Saturday that Israel regrets the deaths of three Egyptian policemen who were killed during Thursday's terror attacks near Eilat



Error (Ha'aretz, Anshel Pfeffer, news brief, 7/14/11): Military police are launching an investigation into the killing of a Palestinian civilian by an IDF force yesterday in a Jordan Valley refugee camp.

Correction (Online as of 7/17/11): Military police are launching an investigation into the killing of a Palestinian youth by an IDF force yesterday in a Jordan Valley refugee camp... Hamas later confirmed that the youth was a member of the organization."

Fact: The "youth" was 22.



Error (Ha'aretz, Danna Harman, 5/1/11): Al-Dura had sued Yehuda for libel after the doctor, who operated on him in 1994, exposed details from his medical file in order to back claims that the elder al-Dura's scars were the result of surgery - and not caused by the IDF fire that killed his son in September, 2000.

Correction (Posted online as of 5/17/11): Al-Dura had sued Yehuda for libel after the doctor, who operated on him in 1994, exposed details from his medical file in order to back claims that the elder al-Dura's scars were the result of surgery - and not caused by the IDF fire that he claims killed his son in September, 2000.



Error (Ha'aretz, Zvi Bar'el, Op-Ed, 1/16/11): Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat proposed a reasonable real estate swap: Beit Yonatan would not be evacuated or sealed, and in exchange, the municipality would delay the evacuation of the Abu Na'eb home where Palestinians live. A house in which Jews live illegally will be exchanged for a house in which Palestinians live entirely legally.

Correction (1/17/11): Due to a translation error, Zvi Bar'el's op-ed ("From Beit Bialik to Beit Yonatan," Haaretz, January 16), contained an inaccurate reference to Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat's proposed solution to the Beit Yonatan issue. The sentence in question should have read: "A house in which Jews live illegally will be exchanged for a house in which Palestinians live illegally."



Error (Ha'aretz, headline, 11/1/2010): Report: Hamas admits for first time losing 200-300 men in Gaza war

Correction (Updated headline): Report: Hamas admits for first time losing more than 600 men in Gaza war



Error (Ha'aretz, Akiva Eldar, 3/21/10): Twenty-one percent of settlers believe that all means must be employed in to [sic] resist the evacuation of most West Bank settlements, including the use of arms, according to a recent Hebrew University study.

Correction (9/7/10): A few months ago, it was reported here that a survey by the Hebrew University's Truman Institute shows that most settlers support the use of legal means to thwart a government decision to evacuate communities in the West Bank. I also reported that over a fifth of those surveyed "believe that all means must be employed in to resist the evacuation of most West Bank settlements, including the use of arms." Following a reader comment, it should be noted that the appendage, "including the use of arms" was not actually part of the question and was too broad an interpretation for it to be included in "all means."



Error (Ha'aretz Magazine, Gideon Levy, 1/21/05): Have you ever stopped for a moment next to a sign that leads to the Ofer camp, a euphemism for a mass detention facility in which about 800,000 Palestinians are now imprisoned, most of them without trial?

Correction (On Web site as of 1/28/05, not corrected in print): Have you ever stopped for a moment next to a sign that leads to the Ofer camp, a euphemism for a mass detention facility in which about 800 Palestinians are now imprisoned, most of them without trial?