Haaretz
Media Corrections

Accuracy and accountability are among the most important tenets of journalism. In combination, they mean media organizations are expected to publish or broadcast forthright corrections after sharing inaccurate information. The following corrections are among the many prompted by CAMERA’s communication with reporters and editors.

 

In Wadi Hummus Demolitions Story, Journalistic Precision Is a Casualty

Given the complicated geopolitical realities of the disputed city of Jerusalem, journalists have a particular responsibility to be precise. That was not the case, however, when several news reports this week inaccurately placed the demolished Wadi Hummus buildings in Jerusalem.

Haaretz Corrects: Israel Hopes to Strengthen Coordination with Russian, Not Syrian, Army

CAMERA prompts correction of a series of articles in Haaretz's English edition which erroneously reported that a Russian-Israeli meeting was dedicated to the "strengthening of the security coordination between Israel and Syria's armies." In fact, Benjamin Netanyahu's meeting with Vladminir Putin will address coordination with the Russian, not Syrian, army.

Haaretz Corrects Again About Nakba Law

For the third time, CAMERA prompts a Haaretz correction on Israel's "Nakba Law," which enables the Finance Minister to withhold funding from state-funded bodies which mourn the founding of Israel. Haaretz clarifies today that the law does not forbid discussion of the Palestinian "catastrophe" in public institutions.

Haaretz Clarifies: Airbnb Boycott Doesn’t Apply to Jerusalem

Following communication from CAMERA, Haaretz clarifies its Airbnb coverage, making clear that the hospitality company's West Bank settlements boycott does not also extend to eastern Jerusalem. The New York Post likewise corrects the error.

Haaretz Corrects Reference to Tel Aviv as Israel’s Capital

After correcting erroneous references to Tel Aviv, Haaretz joins a host of international media outlets which have previously corrected after they too botched the journalistic practice of referring to a nation's capital as shorthand for the country or its government.