Haaretz
Media Corrections

Accuracy and accountability are among the most important tenets of journalism. In combination, they mean media organizations are expected to publish or broadcast forthright corrections after sharing inaccurate information. The following corrections are among the many prompted by CAMERA’s communication with reporters and editors.

 

Haaretz Corrects: No Gaza Fishing Ban

CAMERA prompts correction today after Haaretz erroneously reported in Hebrew and English that Israel imposed a fishing ban on the Gaza Strip. Israel reduced the fishing zone to six nautical miles, but there is no ban.

Haaretz Corrects: 3 Kidnapped ‘Soldiers’ Were Murdered Civilian Teens

CAMERA prompts correction after Haaretz's Chemi Shalev referred to the July 2014 kidnapping and murder of three Israeli teens as "the kidnapping of three Israeli soldiers." It was a crime that shocked the nation and sparked a series of events leading to war. It's hard to imagine how the Haaretz editor got this wrong.

In Wadi Hummus Demolitions Story, Journalistic Precision Is a Casualty

Given the complicated geopolitical realities of the disputed city of Jerusalem, journalists have a particular responsibility to be precise. That was not the case, however, when several news reports this week inaccurately placed the demolished Wadi Hummus buildings in Jerusalem.

Haaretz Corrects: Israel Hopes to Strengthen Coordination with Russian, Not Syrian, Army

CAMERA prompts correction of a series of articles in Haaretz's English edition which erroneously reported that a Russian-Israeli meeting was dedicated to the "strengthening of the security coordination between Israel and Syria's armies." In fact, Benjamin Netanyahu's meeting with Vladminir Putin will address coordination with the Russian, not Syrian, army.