Minorities in Israel

Mixed Arab-Jewish Haifa, Lost in AFP’s Arabic Translation

AFP's Arabic service offers up a unique and misleading description of Haifa, dubbing it "the Arab mixed city in the north," ignoring 75 percent of the city's population, which is Jewish. The news agency's English article, in contrast, accurately describes Haifa as "the mixed Arab-Jewish city of Haifa in northern Israel."

Has Coverage of Israel’s Nation-State Law Been Sober and Factual?

One can debate the merits and demerits of a law while presenting the facts accurately. Indeed, that is the role of a journalist. Both news stories and opinion columns should be based on accurate facts without overstatement or distortion. Unfortunately, many in the mainstream media have failed in these respects.  

News Fit to Frame: Jodi Rudoren on National Service in Israel

If 62 percent of Arabs in Israel back the state's national service program, why does a New York Times story on the subject devote 82 percent of quoted words by Arabs to opponents of the program? The newspaper is forcing stories through its preferred frame.

Presspectiva Editor-in-Chief Published in Ha’aretz

Yishai Goldflam, editor-in-chief of Presspectiva, CAMERA's Hebrew Web site, published an Op-Ed column in Ha'aretz, faulting that paper and other Israeli media for spreading the falsehood that Israel maintains "Jewish-only" roads in the West Bank. This is significant, especially since the fiction of "Jewish-only" roads features prominently in "Israel apartheid" mythology and is frequently cited by anti-Israel and pro-BDS agitators.

Discriminatory Lies and Discriminatory Laws in The New York Times

The claim that Israel has 35 laws that discriminate against Arab citizens is a transparently false canard meant to delegitimize the Jewish state. But that did not prevent the New York Times from publishing it, in violation of codes of ethics requiring accuracy even in the opinion pages.

Mainliners Speak Truth to Jewish, Not Arab and Muslim, Power

Common Global Ministries, the overseas arm of two mainline Protestant churches in the U.S., tacitly admits its one-sided witness about human rights in the Middle East is motivated by fear of Islamist violence against Christians in the region.